Sheril Kirshenbaum

Host, Serving Up Science

Serving Up Science host Sheril Kirshenbaum is a history buff, science writer, and curious foodie.

Sheril also hosts Michigan State's Our Table round table series exploring where our food comes from and how it influences our lives. She is also executive director of Science Debate, a nonprofit, nonpartisan initiative to restore science to its rightful place in politics.

Sheril Kirshenbaum works to enhance public understanding of science and improve communication between scientists, policymakers, and the public.

Melissa / Flickr Creative Commons

If your kids packed their own lunch, what would it look like? After speaking to the kids at the Spartan Child Development Center in East Lansing, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega say it might be healthier than you'd imagine. On this week's episode of Serving Up Science, Sheril and Karel interviewed some 5-year olds to find out how much they really know about healthy eating. 


Tailgating grill photo
Andrew Sprung / flickr creative commons

Independence Day is the biggest grilling day of the year, and grill-masters all over the country are going to be putting their skills to the test. While grilling is an age-old technique, you can look to science to perfect your craft. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega uncover the science behind making the best (and safest!) grilled meat.


Rebecca Siegel / Flickr creative commons

More than just a millennial foodie trend, pickling has roots that go all the way back to ancient Mesopotamia. What was once a tool used to preserve foods in the harshest of climates is now filling mason jars in refrigerators all over the country. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega dive deep into the origins of pickling, and give some tasty advice to amateur picklers.


kittenfc / Flickr Creative Commons

Did you know that 48 million Americans are affected by food-borne illnesses every year? Luckily, on today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss how you can avoid that fate. Whether it be washing your hands for longer than you think, or being extra careful about separating your foods, there are lots of ways you can make sure dinner is yummy and safe. 


fisherman holding salmon
Wikamedia commons

When buying fish, do you find yourself wrestling with whether to buy "Wild-Caught" or "Farm-Raised"? Fear no more, because this week, sea cucumber expert and science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum, and WKAR's Karel Vega dive into the pros and cons of the two sources.

Last week, Sheril and Karel uncovered some of the secrets about food labels. This week, they demystify another.


On this week's Current State - suicide prevention in Michigan; what former MSU dean William Strampel could face during trial; Michigan to vote on legalizing marijuana; cooking Kugel; constructing vehicles that drive 1600 miles without stopping for gas; remembering Robert F. Kennedy's impact on Michiganders; and find out where a 1-million square foot pot warehouse is being built in the Great Lakes. 


Karel Vega / Created using Creative Commons Images

They say never judge a book by its cover. This week, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega add: never judge a food by its label. Although the cute labels that read "Gluten Free" and "Non-GMO" might seem appealing, they are often not a useful representation of the product within. 


On this edition of Current State: Michigan teachers who say they are leaving the classroom because they cannot afford to remain in the profession; PBS President & CEO Paula Kerger talks about why more Americans are tuning into public media for news content and the network's expanding education role; perspective on an MSU alum who will help pick the next president; and the return of "Ondas en Espanol" host Tony "El Chayo" Cervantes. 


Karel Vega / WKAR-MSU

Yes, you read that right. Noodles. Last week you heard science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum make Posole. This week, WKAR's Karel Vega tries his hand at a classic jewish dessert made with cottage cheese and noodles. In part 2 of their recipe exchange, Karel steps outside of his comfort zone, and finds himself pleasantly surprised with the results.   


Sheril Kirshenbaum / WKAR-MSU

Have you ever felt like your recipes are lacking diversity? WKAR's Karel Vega and science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum challenged each other to make a dish from the other's heritage. In part 1 of their recipe exchance, Sheril  tries her hand at making pozole - a traditional Mexican stew, with a recipe courtesy of Karel's mom.


This week's Current State focuses on an MSU's "New Day" proposal, a new sexual assault investigator in Ingham County, virtual learning in Michigan, learning everything there is to know about plants and why WKAR may be a little harder to tune in these days. 


Joseph Siffred Duplessis / Wikimedia Creative Commons

Did you know Benjamin Franklin started a revolution to eat more potatoes in France? A small history lesson on this episode of Serving Up Science as history buff Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss the founding father's contributions to the world of food.


Karel Vega / WKAR-MSU

By adding a molecule known as heme into the patty, the creators of the vegan "Impossible Burger" claim it contains the aroma and taste of meat. In this episode of Serving Up Science Sheril and Karel eat the "Impossible Burger" to find out if it lives up to the hype.


Gluten-free bread
Pixabay

Eating gluten-free has become one of the biggest diet trends of the past few years. Celebrities promote the diet, and some fitness gurus even claim going gluten-free gives a person more energy. Is it right for you? 


Sheril with Question Marks
Illustration / WKAR-MSU

Where do you look for information on what you eat? Nearly half of Americans don't trust academic scientists when it comes to information about food. Instead, close to a third of Americans put more trust in friends, family and social media.


Pages