weather

Portland church sign
Peter Whorf / WKAR

Last week's tornado damaged several churches. Current State talks with one pastor about the aftermath of the devastating storm.


Courtesy Spencer Hughes Photography

Picture this: you’re walking along the shores of Lake Michigan on a warm spring day. The lake breeze is blowing and the waves are lapping at your feet when all of the sudden you see something strange out on the water. Like, say, the Chicago skyline.

Flickr - Rachel McBee

Fifty years ago today, people in six midwest states including Michigan were still in shock from a massive tornado outbreak April 11th and 12th. The 1965 Palm Sunday outbreak was the third deadliest on record in the U. S., and it helped to usher in the modern system of watches and warnings to inform people about severe weather.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

We are all digging out from the first major snow storm of the winter season. Winter Storm Linus has now passed us and is hitting New England.

April Van Buren/WKAR

The city of Lansing today is bringing residents up to date on the winter storm that blasted the area yesterday. Current State’s Scott Pohl talks with Chad Gamble, the city of Lansing’s director of Public Service, for a look at how Lansing has responded to the storm and what lies ahead.

http://www.wilx.com/

Much of the Midwest is finally caught in the grip of Old Man Winter. This week brings the lowest Mid-Michigan temperatures since last year’s infamous “polar vortex”. What do the next weeks have in store?

Flickr - Rudolf Vlček

The Lansing area is expected to get a break from yesterday’s stormy weather that triggered flooding and weather warnings.

Fickr - cseeman

The mercury is slowing climbing and Thursday marks the first day of spring. As the snow fades away it’s time to be aware of the dangers of flooding. High water can be a dangerous scenario for drivers on the roads and also for anyone in low-lying areas. First responders are getting ready for those potential hazards.

Flickr - Yannick Bammert

How much longer?  That’s the question on most of our minds as March 1st and “meteorological spring” arrive.  Current State got a spring forecast preview from WILX’s Andy Provenzano.

Flickr - Fellowship of the Rich

With prolonged frigid temperatures, frequent snowfall, and related transportation and power emergencies, winter has hit mid-Michigan hard.

And with more than another month of the season to go, Lansing and many other municipalities are nearing the end of road salt supplies and the money to buy more.

Flickr - jackcarrozzo

Thousands of Michigan households and businesses that use propane gas continue to be squeezed by a shortage of the fuel.

Joe Linstroth

Residents throughout the state woke up to over a foot of heavy snow, following last nights large storm. Cold temperatures and high winds halted activities throughout mid-Michigan on Monday. 

The mayors of Lansing and East Lansing declared snow emergencies on Sunday, closing all non- essential government facilities. Current State spoke with several local officials for the latest on the snow emergency. 

Scott Pohl/WKAR

At the Michigan Historical Museum in Lansing, a new exhibit called “Lake Effects” examines the state’s weather history, including the state’s worst natural disasters.

Courtesy of the Flint Journal

On June 8, 1953, an F-5 tornado hit Flint and the nearby community of Beecher, killing 116 people.  It was the tenth deadliest tornado in U. S. history, and a generation of Michigan residents would never look at a dark sky the same way again.

Last year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration set up an experiment that changed the way tornado warning messages were communicated to the public. The experiment was conducted to better understand how social science plays a role in peoples understanding of severe weather warnings. The experiment was successful. The changes will expand to 12 states this April, including Michigan.

Spring weather forecast with WILX's Andy Provenzano

Mar 20, 2013
http://www.wilx.com

Meteorologist Andy Provenzano spoke with WKAR's Peter Whorf about the first days of spring 2013 and a look at the weeks to come.  Their conversation began by looking back to last year's unusual and problematic March.

Snowstorm Dumps More Than 19 Inches On Michigan

Dec 21, 2012
WKAR File Photo

A snowstorm hitting the Midwest dumped more than 19 inches of snow in northern Michigan and knocked out power to at least 142,000 state electricity customers.  

WKAR file photo

The National Weather Service says Lansing set a record Friday for its highest temperature ever officially recorded.

clconroy / morgueFile

The latest round of cold temperatures following an unseasonably warm stretch earlier in the year is being blamed for wiping out some fruit crops in West Michigan.

Warm weather has promoted fruit trees in Michigan to bloom four or five weeks ahead of schedule.  That means that bees need to be here early, too, but most of the bees that pollinate orchards in Michigan are still wintering in Florida or are busy pollinating crops in California.

Many of us are enjoying this unseasonably warm weather.  But for some farmers, it’s nerve-racking,  especially for fruit growers.  Fruit trees are starting to sprout two or more weeks ahead of time.  It’s only March, so cold weather is very likely to come back and kill off those early-blooming crops.

WKAR photo

Storms brought heavy snow to parts of southern Michigan, with up to 10 inches reported in the Lansing area.

The National Weather Service says 7 to 9.5 inches of snow fell by Wednesday morning around Lansing. WLNS-TV reports 10 inches in St. Johns. Most Lansing-area schools were closed.
 

The snow came after heavy rains flooded some areas and roadways Tuesday. The storms left thousands without power.