Science & Technology

Science and Technology

Melissa / Flickr Creative Commons

If your kids packed their own lunch, what would it look like? After speaking to the kids at the Spartan Child Development Center in East Lansing, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega say it might be healthier than you'd imagine. On this week's episode of Serving Up Science, Sheril and Karel interviewed some 5-year olds to find out how much they really know about healthy eating. 


Tailgating grill photo
Andrew Sprung / flickr creative commons

Independence Day is the biggest grilling day of the year, and grill-masters all over the country are going to be putting their skills to the test. While grilling is an age-old technique, you can look to science to perfect your craft. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega uncover the science behind making the best (and safest!) grilled meat.


Rebecca Siegel / Flickr creative commons

More than just a millennial foodie trend, pickling has roots that go all the way back to ancient Mesopotamia. What was once a tool used to preserve foods in the harshest of climates is now filling mason jars in refrigerators all over the country. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega dive deep into the origins of pickling, and give some tasty advice to amateur picklers.


kittenfc / Flickr Creative Commons

Did you know that 48 million Americans are affected by food-borne illnesses every year? Luckily, on today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss how you can avoid that fate. Whether it be washing your hands for longer than you think, or being extra careful about separating your foods, there are lots of ways you can make sure dinner is yummy and safe. 


Ziv Levi and Jeff Rehm photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR/MSU

Can a hacker seize control of your car? What’s the worst that could happen? The answers are yes, that could happen someday, and the result could be plenty bad.

A Michigan company is working on ways to improve the cyber security of cars.


traffic lights
Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

When you talk about safety in vehicles, you usually think of seatbelts, brakes and airbags. But future safety will literally mean our cars and trucks communicating with stop lights! 


Our entire show is focused on Michigan Technology – changing the way we drive, we live and our health. 

fisherman holding salmon
Wikamedia commons

When buying fish, do you find yourself wrestling with whether to buy "Wild-Caught" or "Farm-Raised"? Fear no more, because this week, sea cucumber expert and science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum, and WKAR's Karel Vega dive into the pros and cons of the two sources.

Last week, Sheril and Karel uncovered some of the secrets about food labels. This week, they demystify another.


Karel Vega / Created using Creative Commons Images

They say never judge a book by its cover. This week, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega add: never judge a food by its label. Although the cute labels that read "Gluten Free" and "Non-GMO" might seem appealing, they are often not a useful representation of the product within. 


Karel Vega / WKAR-MSU

Yes, you read that right. Noodles. Last week you heard science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum make Posole. This week, WKAR's Karel Vega tries his hand at a classic jewish dessert made with cottage cheese and noodles. In part 2 of their recipe exchange, Karel steps outside of his comfort zone, and finds himself pleasantly surprised with the results.   


Sheril Kirshenbaum / WKAR-MSU

Have you ever felt like your recipes are lacking diversity? WKAR's Karel Vega and science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum challenged each other to make a dish from the other's heritage. In part 1 of their recipe exchance, Sheril  tries her hand at making pozole - a traditional Mexican stew, with a recipe courtesy of Karel's mom.


Chevrolet Bolt photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR/MSU

One of the things holding back advancements in alternative fuel vehicles is their range. Nobody wants to run out of fuels like battery power, compressed natural gas or propane. The alternative fuels group Greater Lansing Area Clean Cities is partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy on a project to enable travelling greater distances in these vehicles powered by something other than gasoline.


Anne-Sophie Bohrer

Beyond our gardens, our salads or simply looking at trees.. what do we really know about plants? On Saturday, May 19, dozens of scientists at Michigan State University will share knowledge that goes way past having a green thumb. 


Vinton Cerf photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR/MSU

Last week, a man widely known as one of the “fathers of the internet” visited Michigan State University for a Quello Center lecture called “Internet Past, Present and Future.” Vinton Cerf is a co-designer of the TCP/IP protocols and the architecture of the internet. He's been with Google since 2005. Cerf visited the WKAR studios to discuss several of topics.


Lansing home demolition photo
WKAR File Photo

The demolition of abandoned homes can improve a neighborhood, but the disposal of the materials has an impact on the environment. At Michigan State University this week, proponents of a small but growing movement assembled to discuss ways to re-purpose most of that stuff.


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