police

David Carter photo
Courtesy photo / MSU School of Criminal Justice

Police in cities with substantial murder rates often find themselves backlogged as they work their investigations. New research from a Michigan State University criminologist points to seven American cities that are solving homicides more efficiently. Current State’s Kevin Lavery talks with Professor David Carter.


Eric Trojanowicz photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR

We talk with one of the candidates for Sheriff in Ingham County this year. Eric Trojanowicz is a captain in the department. He’s running as a Republican to replace the retiring Sheriff, Gene Wrigglesworth, and his opponent is the Sheriff’s son, Scott Wrigglesworth.


woman sits at microphone
MSU Today

The Michigan State University Police Department has formed what it calls an Inclusion and Anti-Bias Unit to address racial tension and maintain good community relations.  Current State’s Kevin Lavery talks with the program’s coordinator.

Hugh Clarke Jr. photo
Courtesy photo / Ingham County District Court

One of the criminal justice issues being discussed during this year’s One Book, One Community program is mandatory minimum sentences. The Michigan Supreme Court eliminated mandatory minimums earlier this year. We talk with District Court Judge Hugh Clarke Jr. and MSU criminal justice professor Christopher Smith in advance of a forum on the subject tonight.


Meridian Township Police patch
Courtesy image / Meridian Township Police Department

For 17 years, the Meridian Township Police Department has invited those it serves to get an up close look at day to day life behind the Thin Blue Line. The township’s Police Citizens Academy is an outreach tool that both officers and participants say pays dividends in trust. Current State’s Kevin Lavery previews this year’s session.


Juli Liebler photo
Courtesy city of East Lansing

Juli Liebler is retiring as East Lansing’s chief of police. Current State’s Kevin Lavery talks with her about her career.


“It’s every citizen’s right to film the police.” Those are the words of ACLU Michigan Executive Kary Moss. The occasion was this week’s announcement that the civil liberties organization would offer a free smartphone app that enables users to videotape police encounters. The Mobile Justice Michigan app would then automatically send the video to the ACLU for review.

Kevin Lavery/WKAR

Earlier this month, President Obama issued an executive order banning the federal government from issuing certain types of military equipment to local police departments. The action is in response to an outcry over a militarized show of force during protests last summer in Ferguson, Missouri.

The Lansing Police Department will soon add a controversial new tool to its equipment list: 100 body cameras. Some law enforcement agencies in mid-Michigan are already experimenting with the devices. The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office has 25 body cameras on hand. In Ingham County, officers are testing a few cameras at the county jail, and the department is preparing to receiving more. The East Lansing and Michigan State University police departments are also planning to use body cameras. The device has evolved from a technological novelty to the centerpiece of a new front in the struggle for racial harmony and civil rights.

Last week, two key events in the arena of civil rights took place within days of each other, though one received much more attention than the other. On Thursday, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder released a stinging report on the practices of the Ferguson, Missouri police department. Three days before, a presidential task force submitted a report offering recommendations for building trust between communities and the police. Here in Michigan, a sustained effort to create that sense of trust has been quietly underway for years.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

Gene Wrigglesworth has worn a policeman’s badge for almost 50 years. For more than half that time, he’s served as the Ingham County Sheriff. But in 2016, an era in the county’s history will come to an end. This week, he announced that he will not seek re-election.

Kevin Lavery/WKAR

For weeks, the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner and the grand jury decisions not to indict the police officers involved in their deaths have sparked sometimes violent protests across the country. The cases have even reached mid-Michigan.

Flickr - West Midlands Police

The recent deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner and 12-year-old Tamir Rice in Cleveland have re-ignited the debate over whether police officers should be made to wear body cameras to record their interactions. Some law enforcement agencies around the country have been experimenting with the technology. Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero is expected to announce next month that all city police will soon wear body cameras. In Ingham County, sheriff’s deputies working at the city jail are already trying them out.

Fickr - cseeman

The mercury is slowing climbing and Thursday marks the first day of spring. As the snow fades away it’s time to be aware of the dangers of flooding. High water can be a dangerous scenario for drivers on the roads and also for anyone in low-lying areas. First responders are getting ready for those potential hazards.

Lansing police chief updates local shooting

Sep 18, 2013

Lansing Police continue their investigation into a shooting Tuesday afternoon that left at least three Sexton High School students injured. LPD says none of the injuries were life-threatening and at least two victims have been discharged from hospitals. Early Wednesday morning, WKAR's Mark Bashore spoke with Lansing Police Chief Mike Yankowski.  

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