police

Juli Liebler photo
Courtesy city of East Lansing

Juli Liebler is retiring as East Lansing’s chief of police. Current State’s Kevin Lavery talks with her about her career.


“It’s every citizen’s right to film the police.” Those are the words of ACLU Michigan Executive Kary Moss. The occasion was this week’s announcement that the civil liberties organization would offer a free smartphone app that enables users to videotape police encounters. The Mobile Justice Michigan app would then automatically send the video to the ACLU for review.

Kevin Lavery/WKAR

Earlier this month, President Obama issued an executive order banning the federal government from issuing certain types of military equipment to local police departments. The action is in response to an outcry over a militarized show of force during protests last summer in Ferguson, Missouri.

The Lansing Police Department will soon add a controversial new tool to its equipment list: 100 body cameras. Some law enforcement agencies in mid-Michigan are already experimenting with the devices. The Eaton County Sheriff’s Office has 25 body cameras on hand. In Ingham County, officers are testing a few cameras at the county jail, and the department is preparing to receiving more. The East Lansing and Michigan State University police departments are also planning to use body cameras. The device has evolved from a technological novelty to the centerpiece of a new front in the struggle for racial harmony and civil rights.

Last week, two key events in the arena of civil rights took place within days of each other, though one received much more attention than the other. On Thursday, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder released a stinging report on the practices of the Ferguson, Missouri police department. Three days before, a presidential task force submitted a report offering recommendations for building trust between communities and the police. Here in Michigan, a sustained effort to create that sense of trust has been quietly underway for years.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

Gene Wrigglesworth has worn a policeman’s badge for almost 50 years. For more than half that time, he’s served as the Ingham County Sheriff. But in 2016, an era in the county’s history will come to an end. This week, he announced that he will not seek re-election.

Kevin Lavery/WKAR

For weeks, the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner and the grand jury decisions not to indict the police officers involved in their deaths have sparked sometimes violent protests across the country. The cases have even reached mid-Michigan.

Flickr - West Midlands Police

The recent deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner and 12-year-old Tamir Rice in Cleveland have re-ignited the debate over whether police officers should be made to wear body cameras to record their interactions. Some law enforcement agencies around the country have been experimenting with the technology. Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero is expected to announce next month that all city police will soon wear body cameras. In Ingham County, sheriff’s deputies working at the city jail are already trying them out.

Fickr - cseeman

The mercury is slowing climbing and Thursday marks the first day of spring. As the snow fades away it’s time to be aware of the dangers of flooding. High water can be a dangerous scenario for drivers on the roads and also for anyone in low-lying areas. First responders are getting ready for those potential hazards.

Lansing police chief updates local shooting

Sep 18, 2013

Lansing Police continue their investigation into a shooting Tuesday afternoon that left at least three Sexton High School students injured. LPD says none of the injuries were life-threatening and at least two victims have been discharged from hospitals. Early Wednesday morning, WKAR's Mark Bashore spoke with Lansing Police Chief Mike Yankowski.  

Current State #70 | April 19, 2013

Apr 19, 2013

Today on Current State: Lansing police chief retires; folk legend Tom Paxton; Michigan tourism; world renowned trumpeter Alison Balsom; and the Lansing Marathon.

Lansing police chief Teresa Szymanski retires

Apr 19, 2013
via Wikimedia Commons

 

 Teresa Szymanski joined the Lansing Police Department in 1987. She earned her stripes over the years and rose to become the city’s police chief in 2010.  Her tenure has been marked with successes and setbacks.

Chief Szymanski is retiring from the Lansing Police Department this week.  She chats with Current State about her time at the helm of Lansing law enforcement.

Lansing police respond to budget cut pressure

Mar 21, 2013
Wikimedia commons

Police and firefighters in the city of Lansing are under pressure to make concessions to improve the city’s short and long-term budget woes.  Last week, a long-awaited report from the city’s blue ribbon “Financial Health Team” called for a million dollars to be cut from the police department’s budget.  

Discussing the issue is the President of the Lansing Fraternal Order of Police---the police officers and supervisors’ union---Tom Krug and from the city of Lansing, Chief Operating Officer and Director of Public Service, Chad Gamble.

WKAR File Photo

Authorities investigating a shooting spree along the Interstate 96 corridor plan to boost patrols Saturday as fans travel to a Michigan State football game.

WKAR file photo

A news organization has found wide variations in the rates of drunken driving arrests among Michigan police agencies, with the hometowns of Michigan State University and the University of Michigan showing one of the sharpest contrasts.

WKAR file photo

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero has announced the city will be hiring more police officers.

Melissa Benmark / WKAR

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette says he still hopes the Legislature will approve his proposal for one thousand new police officers to be hired in the state.