Michigan history

Flickr - U.S. Embassy New Delhi

On Friday, our nation celebrates its 238th birthday. But today, America is also observing the passage of one of the most significant laws ever crafted in its history.  On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The law that forbids discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin was born in an era of violence and intolerance in America.

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On June 24th, 1950, Northwest Airlines Flight 2501 left New York City for Seattle. The state of the art DC-4 aircraft was to stop in Minneapolis for refueling, before proceeding to the west coast. Monitoring the plane in threatening weather over Lake Michigan, air controllers lost track of the flight. The aircraft was never recovered, nor were any passengers or crew. Further wreckage discovered some days later indicated a total loss.

WKAR/Kevin Lavery

The history of 20th century design in Michigan isn’t just about automobiles. After World War II, Michigan was a hub for architects who broke away from the neo-classical shapes inspired by ancient Greece and Rome. The era of modern architecture lasted about 30 years and produced many structures still seen today.

WKAR/Nicole Strobel

The sound of trains can be commonly heard in Owosso. This weekend, steam whistles will be added to the clickety-clack of steel wheels during the Steam Railroading Institute’s Train Expo 2014.

Fri. June 6 - 9am - 90.5 WKAR | Today's Generation Honors the Greatest Generation. Current State from WKAR presents a special 30-minute audio documentary commemorating the 70th anniversary of D-Day.

Place-making with historic preservation

May 16, 2014
Wikimedia Commons

Historic preservation stakeholders from across the state are convening in Jackson, Michigan this week for the annual Michigan Historic Preservation Network conference. The network works to recognize and conserve Michigan’s architectural culture.

Scott Pohl/WKAR


A new book by Jack Dempsey tells the story of Detroit’s historic Capitol Park. It’s the site of Michigan’s first capitol building, and the state’s first governor is buried there.

New book chronicles Lansing's First Family

Apr 24, 2014
Flickr - Greater Lansing Convention & Visitor's Bureau

Take a drive through Lansing Township north of the Capitol, and you’re likely to pass by a stately Classical Revival-style mansion.  Beginning in 1855, the  Turner-Dodge House on North Street was home to several generations of one of  Lansing’s most prominent families.  Today, it’s an interpretive center with its own spot on the National Register of Historic Places.

Wikimedia Commons

March is Women’s History Month, and Current State’s Scott Pohl talks with the author of a new book about one Michigan woman's role in America’s suffrage movement. 

Anna Howard Shaw was born in England in 1847. Her family moved to America and she grew up in Michigan. After an isolated farm upbringing, Shaw enrolled at Albion College, which became a springboard to a life as a minister and medical school studies in Boston, and ultimately to work in the reform movements of that era.

Ex-German POW to share story at Statehood Day event

Jan 24, 2014
Joe Linstroth/WKAR

On January 26th, 1837, Michigan was admitted as the 26th state to the Union. The Michigan Historical Museum is celebrating our state’s 177th birthday with its annual Michigan Statehood Day planned for tomorrow. The celebration is also centered around the 70th anniversary of D-Day.

Grand Ledge church looks to solve time capsule mystery

Dec 11, 2013
Joe Linstroth/WKAR

Earlier this year, as part of its centennial celebration, members of the Trinity Episcopal Church in Grand Ledge removed a time capsule that had been placed in the cornerstone all the way back in 1912.

www.carlbradley.org

The sinking of the SS Carl D. Bradley claimed the lives of 33 crewmembers on Lake Michigan. The Bradley wreck doesn’t get talked about as much as the Edmund Fitzgerald does, but it is a story worth remembering.

Flickr - bettybarcode

Tonight, the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame in Lansing will induct six new nominees to its ranks.  Two are high-profile women from Lansing.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

At the Michigan Historical Museum in Lansing, a new exhibit called “Lake Effects” examines the state’s weather history, including the state’s worst natural disasters.

Biography explores Gerald Ford's early years

Sep 30, 2013
Flickr-kwatson0013

Gerald Ford was the only President who came from Michigan. Biographer Rick Boorem focuses on a time of President Ford’s life far removed from the pressures of the Presidency.  His book is called ‘Young Jerry Ford, Athlete and Citizen.’

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