immigration

WKAR-MSU

A community forum is planned in Saginaw to discuss immigrant rights and activities since the presidential election.

umich.edu

The city of Ann Arbor is taking a step toward considering stronger protections for immigrants living in the U.S. without legal permission.

 

Kurt Stepnitz / MSU.EDU

A federal judge in Detroit says U.S. green-card holders shouldn't be affected by President Donald Trump's order temporarily banning refugees and immigrants from seven mostly Muslim countries.

Gov. Rick Snyder photo
http://www.michigan.gov/

Gov. Rick Snyder says President Trump has opened a “much-needed” national conversation on immigration with his order that limits travel from seven majority-Muslim nations.

downtown buildings
WKAR File Photo

The city of Lansing is home to nearly 800 settled refugees from some 30 countries. An effort to declare the city a sanctuary appears to be gathering strength.


Susan Reed photo
Courtesy photo

Attorneys in Michigan and elsewhere are still trying to get information about and access to people detained at ports of entry. That’s after Friday’s immigration order signed by President Trump.

Wikimedia Commons

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan says national security isn't served by President Donald Trump's order suspending entry to the U.S. for people from seven Muslim-majority countries and halting refugee admissions.

woman in MSU student lounge
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

Many Michigan State University students are trying to come to grips with President Trump’s executive order banning certain immigrants from entering the U.S.

 

The order affects people arriving from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Sudan. 

 

 

Ghazal Mehrani, a Lansing attorney of Iranian decent is helping area students to try and navigate their way through the ban. 

 

MSU student Faezah declined to give her full name.  She's Iranian.  She says the ban has everyone in her community “feeling new aspects of pain.”

 


MICHIGAN.GOV

Michigan's civil rights chief is condemning President Donald Trump's immigration crackdown, saying the president's executive order "hurts us all." 

Peter Whorf / WKAR-MSU

Immigration enforcement is not a primary function of Michigan state and local police, according to Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder.

Snyder ribbon cutting ceremony photo
Courtesy photo / Global Detroit

A new report examines the economic impact being made by the more than 640,000 immigrants who call Michigan home. We learn more from Michigan Office for New Americans deputy director Karen Phillippi.


Immigration photo
Britt Selvitelle / flickr creative commons

Last week, a federal appeals court decided to continue blocking implementation of two immigration programs. The initiatives would extend and expand opportunities to millions of America’s undocumented immigrants. We talk with a local immigration rights advocate about why she’s unhappy with the decision, along with a former MSU employee whose family is impacted by the decision.


Syrian refugees photo
Freedom House / flickr creative commons

Gov. Rick Snyder has suspended plans to allow Syrian refugees in Michigan pending a review of Homeland Security vetting processes. The decision has generated vigorous support and opposition. We talk with State Sen. Rick Jones, who supports the move, and East Lansing surgeon Dr. Majid Katranji, who opposes it.


picture of Congressman John Moolenaar
Congressional Pictorial Directory

Back in January, Midland Republican John Moolenaar replaced veteran U.S. Congressman Dave Camp in Michigan's fourth congressional district. Current State talks to the Harvard and Hope College graduate about his opposition to the Iran nuclear deal, immigration and other issues. 

Immigration advocates in Michigan are decrying a federal judge’s ruling striking down two executive orders protecting millions of immigrants from deportation. Last November, President Obama announced two programs that were set to take effect today.  One would prevent  undocumented parents of children legally living in the U-S from being sent back to their countries of origin. The other extends protections for undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U-S as children.

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