Health

'Primary Care' comes to WKAR TV Sundays

Apr 27, 2015
portrait: Dr. Lonnie Joe, Jr.
courtesy

Sundays 2pm on WKAR TV | New culturally relevant health series launches first season on WKAR

Courtesy MSU Today

For a while now, medical professionals have thought there was a connection between abdominal fat and high blood pressure. Turns out, that belly fat may be more or less talking to the body’s blood vessels. The National Institutes of Health has given a grant to some MSU researchers who want to listen in on what that conversation might be.

Stethoscope photo
Flickr/surroundsound5000

Medicaid benefits used to be available mostly to low-income children, pregnant women, and disabled adults in Michigan. But that changed in 2013 when Michigan voted to use federal funds from the Affordable Care Act to extend those benefits to more people. Gov. Rick Snyder was a major force behind the legislation, saying it would mean lower healthcare costs and more federal dollars for Michigan. Healthy Michigan, the state’s expanded Medicaid program, has enrolled nearly 600,000 people to date. But the future of the program depends on the Department of Health and Human Services getting a waiver from the federal government.

Courtesy David Lacks Jr.

The Lansing Community College “One Book One LCC” initiative this year has focused on a community read of “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks”, and it concludes Tuesday night with a chance to hear from two of her grandchildren. Lacks died in 1951, and cells from her tumor, taken for research without her consent, have led to ethical debates. Jeri Lacks Whye and David Lacks Jr. will be at LCC on Tuesday.

http://gophouse.org/representatives/southwest/callton/

For years now, Michigan has struggled with how to implement its medical marijuana law. Voters approved legalized pot in 2008, but applying the law has been fraught with complications. Patients, caregivers, physicians, law enforcement, local and state governments and the courts all have had different concerns. The challenge boils down to how to regulate the drug and how to get it safely and responsibly to the people who are entitled to it. In recent years, Republican State Rep. Mike Callton has been in the middle of the state legislature’s effort to move forward.

Michigan office prepares for health impacts of climate change

Apr 13, 2015
Scott Pohl/WKAR

Since 2009, Michigan officials have been ramping up an effort to address the health consequences of climate change. For example, health experts anticipate greater respiratory challenges like asthma as warmer temperatures intensify smog and fuel more wildfires that emit soot. The Michigan Climate & Health Adaptation Program, MI-CHAP, is participating in a joint effort with the national Centers for Disease Control to create what it calls "climate-ready states and cities."

Proposed MI law would increase nurses’ authority

Apr 2, 2015
www.gvsu.edu/kcon

Millions of people have signed up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Will there be enough doctors for the influx of new patients? One solution to a potential doctor shortage is to give nurses with advanced training more autonomy. That’s what a bill currently in the State Senate would do. It would allow advanced practice registered nurses, or APRN's, to prescribe medication and play a more prominent role in health care.

UM study: fast food may be addictive

Mar 27, 2015
www.lsa.umich.edu/psych

A new study from the University of Michigan indicates that there may be something to those fast food cravings you get. The findings indicate that highly processed foods heavy in fat, salt, and sugar are among the most addictive foods out there.

Flickr-Masahiro Ihara

When you need to stock up on milk or fresh fruits and vegetables for the week, you probably just drive a couple miles to the nearest Kroger or Meijer. Or maybe you take a trip to your local farmers market and load up your trunk with groceries. But for 1.8-million Michiganders, it isn’t quite so easy to find healthy food. That’s the number of people living in so called “food deserts”, according to a new report from the Philadelphia based organization The Food Trust.

A Michigan State University doctoral student in neuroscience has written a book about sexual assault and how post traumatic stress disorder affects women. Apryl Pooley is the author of “Shadow Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Journey Through PTSD and Womanhood”.

Stethoscope photo
Flickr/surroundsound5000

Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns is back with his latest production. “Cancer:  The Emperor of All Maladies” is described as the most comprehensive documentary ever made about a single disease. It airs in three installments on WKAR-TV next Monday through Wednesday nights. This Thursday evening, WKAR is hosting an abbreviated look at the film. The gathering will also include presentations from local health professionals who’ll offer various perspectives on the disease.

In Michigan, there are 191 areas designated as having a mental health care health professional shortage. Only and Texas and California have higher numbers of shortages, and that has devastating consequences. New research from the Child Health Institute found that young people in rural areas are twice as likely to commit suicide than their urban peers. In two northern Michigan counties, state and local officials are trying to hard to improve mental health care access for its rural residents.

Courtesy - MSU Department of Horticulture

The first documented case of Alzheimer’s disease was recorded in 1906. Since then, scientists have struggled to understand the cause of this neurological disorder that robs the mind of normal behavior. A Michigan State University chemist believes a natural compound from a well-known medicinal plant may one day be used to treat Alzheimer’s. He’s patented that compound in the hopes of starting human clinical trials.

Flickr - torbakhopper

Earlier this week, Chris Borland, a top rookie in the National Football League last season and a San Francisco 49ers linebacker, made a rather surprising decision. After one year in the pros, he decided to step away from the sport and call it quits. His explanation was concern about the long-term effects of trauma to the head and the reality of concussions.

Courtesy University of Michigan Health System

March is colorectal cancer awareness month. Health professionals will tell you that kind of cancer can be treated quite successfully, but first it has to be detected. And to be detected, people have to know to get screened for it. That’s why this Saturday you may notice a giant inflatable colon at Briarwood Mall in Ann Arbor.

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