fracking

Scott Pohl/WKAR

Last week on Current State, we heard from the leader of a Michigan petition effort that's aimed at banning hydraulic fracturing in the state. Fracking, as it’s called, pumps a combination of water and chemicals into underground rock where natural gas and oil are trapped. The process crushes the rock surrounding the deposits and frees them. The growth of hydraulic fracturing is credited for making the United States the world’s leading producer of oil and gas.

http://www.letsbanfracking.org/

For the third time in recent years, opponents of hydraulic fracturing are organizing to end the practice in Michigan. The Committee to Ban Fracking, based in Charlevoix, has begun a ballot campaign hoping to put a ban before voters in next years general election.

Credit: http://graham.umich.edu/users/jcallew

Hydraulic fracturing--or fracking as its commonly known--involves drilling for natural gas by injecting a mixture or water, sand, and chemicals into the ground. 

State environmental regulators have rolled out proposed new rules to cover hydraulic “fracking” for natural gas.

A new report shows almost 70% of actively producing oil and gas wells in Michigan are not being inspected as often as the state intends.

Courtesy / Suncor Energy

There’s a debate at the state Capitol about a natural gas drilling process known as “fracking.” Drills use a mixture of chemicals and water to extract gas from hard-to-reach pockets underground. The practice has been around for decades. Problems have been reported in other parts of the country – although never in Michigan.

But Democratic state Representative Lisa Brown says the fact that wells are now going deeper and using directional drilling raises questions.