Environment

Wikimedia Commons

In 1933, America was in the grip of the Great Depression.  Facing the specter of economic ruin,  President Franklin D. Roosevelt instituted a number of federal recovery programs, which came to be known as “Alphabet Soup.”  One of those was the CCC or the Civilian Conservation Corps

Lewis Wallace

Water attracted early settlers to Detroit and water fueled its growth. Now it’s an important asset to the city’s recovery.

Today we continue to explore Detroit’s waterfront in our series "Detroit Water Renaissance."

Last week we looked at the unearthing of Detroit streams. For the second segment, reporter Lewis Wallace examines efforts to re-engineer the Detroit River’s concrete shoreline.

Current State #146 | August 27, 2013

Aug 27, 2013

Today on Current State: new proposal to evaluate Michigan teachers effectiveness; book about living with Muscular Dystrophy; Detroit's Water Renaissance series; Detroit's current environmental initiatives; and MSU student on "Americas Got Talent."

Emanuele Berry WKAR

Water attracted the early settlers of Detroit and water fueled its growth. Now it’s an important asset to the city’s recovery.

Join us over these next five weeks, as our regular Tuesday Knight segment will explore the challenges and opportunities associated with Detroit’s waterfront through our series "Detroit's Water Renaissance."

Our first story goes back to the days before industrialization, when the city of Detroit was a maze of fresh waterways.

Wikimedia Commons

This summer a coalition of Detroit based organization released the Detroit Environmental Agenda. The two-year project addresses improving quality of life through improving the environment. Guy Williams, President of Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice joins Current State to discuss the report his organization helped compile. 

Wikimedia Commons



Waukesha, Wisconsin is on a quest for water; its groundwater supply is dwindling and contaminated.  Although the town is less than 20 miles away from Lake Michigan, it falls west of the Great Lakes basin line, which means no water without permission from the Great Lakes Compact.

Gary Wilson, journalist for Great Lakes Echo and former co-editor of the Great Lakes Town Hall, discuss what Waukesha’s quest for water means for the Great Lakes.

Great Lakes
Flickr/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Texans and Oklahomans don’t just clash over football. They also have a long history of battling over water, with the most recent conflict playing out in the Supreme Court. Justices recently ruled that  the Tarrant  Regional Water District, located in North Texas, cannot divert water from Oklahoma river basins.  

New co-generation power plant set to recharge Lansing

Jun 17, 2013
Kevin Lavery

The massive co-generation power plant rising above Lansing's REO Town neighborhood is nearly complete. The Lansing Board of Water and Light 's (BWL) new 46,000 square-foot facility has been under construction for more than two years. The power plant officially comes online July 1, and will replace four coal-fired steam units at the nearby Moores Park plant built in 1950s. The BWL says the new plant is much more environmentally friendly. Residents and business owners believe it will also bring economic gain to their neighborhood. 

Wikimedia Commons

This Thursday, Lansing residents have a chance to weigh in on the latest suggestion for dealing with city sewage and stormwater.  City administrators say the so-called "Wet Weather" project would combine Lansing’s 20-year old CSO, or “combined sewage overflow” project, with two other similar ones involving sanitary sewer overflow and stormwater. 

 

Flickr

What should America’s energy future be, and how do we hammer out an environmentally conscious national energy security plan for the future?   

Wikimedia Commons

This year record low water levels have spurred the Michigan government to spend over $20 million on dredging. Many hope dredging will enable recreational and commercial boating to continue, preventing revenue loss.

Flickr

It’s been two and a half years since an oil pipeline owned by the Canadian company Enbridge ruptured near Marshall, spewing hundreds of thousands of gallons of heavy crude oil into the Kalamazoo River. The incident has been one of the costliest oil spills in U.S. history and the clean-up is still ongoing.

Steve Hamilton, an MSU scientist who has been monitoring the clean-up, updates Current State on the situation. 

Red Cedar welcomes fish and anglers

Apr 16, 2013
Yanjie Wang

 In December, the MSU Board of Trustee's lifted a 1960's ordinance, which banned fishing on campus. Students are now allowed to fish the Red Cedar in designated areas. To promote fishing on the river, the Department of Natural Resources released 3,000 fish into the river on Monday. Some MSU students and staff hope welcoming anglers will help improve the river’s reputation. 

MSU students launch fossil free campaign

Apr 4, 2013

Environmentalists trying to get Michigan State University to curtail coal-generated power are announcing a new tactic today. The MSU Sierra Student Coalition is launching the MSU Fossil Free campaign. The effort is an attempt to get the university to divest millions of endowment dollars the coalition says are invested in the fossil fuel industry. Callie Bruley, an MSU student and a coordinator of MSU Beyond Coal, and Brad Van Guilder, who represents the Michigan Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal effort, discuss the MSU Fossil Free campaign. 

Wikimedia Commons

 

The American Bird Conservancy released a report last week calling for a ban on widely-used insecticides suspected of damage to bird and aquatic populations.

 

WKAR’s Peter Whorf speaks with MSU assistant professor of zoology Dr. Pamela Rasmussen about the class of insecticides containing neonicotinoids.

Pages