Environment

The Obama years are now behind us. How did the Great Lakes fare as a result?


Moore with mountain scene
msu.edu

Nathan Moore's research in climate change has taken him to such places as China, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and the Amazon. Moore is an assistant professor at MSU's College of Environmental and Resource Sciences. He examines climate change a little closer to home in a conversation with WKAR Morning Edition host Brooke Allen.


The final few days before President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office will be filled with a flurry of congressional activity, as the Senate holds confirmation hearings for eight more of his Cabinet nominees.

Most are expected to be fairly routine, but a few could be hot-button affairs, including hearings for Education Secretary-designate Betsy DeVos and Scott Pruitt, Trump's nominee to lead the Environmental Protection Agency.

Coral bleaching is killing reefs. Is the answer a great migration?

Jan 14, 2017
PBS NewsHour

Coral bleaching is killing reefs. Is the answer a great migration?

Jan 13, 2017
PBS NewsHour

Asian Carp Reg'l Coordinating Committee

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Federal officials say they'll continue efforts to prevent Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes, despite uncertainty about what Donald Trump might propose.

Washington State House Republicans / flickr creative commons

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — State regulators are giving utilities about three months to report how they'll meet electricity demand through 2021.

Lake Superior photo
Pixabay

The Flint Water Crisis became a top story in 2016, but it wasn't the only development involving Michigan water or the Great Lakes. We review and update those stories, and look ahead to 2017, with Great Lakes journalist and commentator Gary Wilson.

Dr. Stuart Gage photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

A retired Michigan State University professor takes us into the woods to listen to what nature has to say. He’s organizing an international conference at MSU this week on ecoacoustics. Current State’s Kevin Lavery has a report.


For our Great Lakes Month in Review, we update a pair of November’s top stories: Nestlé's request for more groundwater from Mecosta County and Michigan’s declaration of Lake Erie as “impaired.”


Gary Glenn photo
Courtesy photo

Energy policy is among the important business before the House of Representatives this week. It’ll begin looking at a bipartisan pair of bills passed by the Senate that lay out the future of Michigan’s electric choice market, replacing coal-fired plants and renewables. We talk to a Republican opponent of the measures.


Whitetail deer photo
pixabay

City of East Lansing workers have been busy counting deer this month. We ask the city’s environmental services administrator what they learn from the head and antler count.


Eric Freedman photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR

We talk with journalist and MSU professor Eric Freedman about the election and environmental issues. He’s recently back from a week in Nairobi, Kenya.


Lake Erie algae photo
Courtesy photo / NWF Great Lakes Regional Center, Ann Arbor

Michigan officials have designated the state’s small piece of Lake Erie an “impaired waterway.” That means it’s possible the federal government could enact stricter regulation to address the problem of algae blooms. We talk with Mike Shriberg of the National Wildlife Federation.


Wenona Singel and Dylan Miner photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR

Residents of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation are protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which is designed to carry a half a million barrels of oil each day across four states. We talk with two Native Americans from the MSU community who are watching the developments.


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