cs140218

Radio Made in Michigan
12:39 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Current State #257 | February 18, 2014

Today on Current State: Advertisers in Olympic games; urban tree farm takes root in Detroit; and supporters defend EAA expansion.

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Radio Made in Michigan
12:37 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Advertisers bet big on Olympic Games

Batra says there has been some turnover in Olympic sponsors, but companies like GE and VISA remain.
Credit Flickr - JL08

While the Super Bowl is big for advertisers, the Olympics are also a coveted time for companies. Current State’s Emanuele Berry spoke with Rajeev Batra, a professor of marketing at the University of Michigan. He is an expert in global branding and advertising and explains what it means to be an Olympic sponsor.

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Radio Made in Michigan
12:34 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Innovative urban tree farm to plant soon in Detroit

Hantz Farm plots were originally intended for agriculture or Christmas trees, but neighbors raised concerns about rodents and pesticides.
Credit Flickr - Mr.Mac2009


After years of delays, Hantz farm is starting to take shape. In 2009, John Hantz, CEO of Southfield-based Hantz Group LLC proposed building the world’s largest urban farm in Detroit. After cutting through red tape and shifting plans to center on building an urban tree farm, the project is starting to unfold.

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Radio Made in Michigan
12:31 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Chancellor, House Ed chair defend proposed EAA expansion

Rep. Lisa Postumus-Lyons says the education system status quo is not working, and children are being left behind.
Credit Flickr - Thomas Favre-Bulle

Michigan legislators could vote this week on a controversial proposal that would expand the state’s Education Achievement Authority.  That’s the state-run district comprised of 15 of the most challenged schools in the state, all in Detroit.

EAA administrators, Gov. Rick Snyder and other supporters say the initiative, now in its second year, is beginning to turn those schools around. They say test scores are rising due to a student-centric teaching model, a longer school year, and grouping students by ability instead of age.

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