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Current State #137 | August 6, 2013

Aug 6, 2013

Today on Current State: the growing seasonal worker population in Michigan; scientific disagreement with Michigan biodiversity bill; the sequestration and Michigan workforce training; and the Whole Foods ripple effect.

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Michigan's signature cherry crop, among other agricultural state staples, depend heavily on thousands of migrant workers each year.  Even after a killing frost destroyed much of the crop in 2012, a new report shows Michigan's migrant and seasonal farm population is growing.

Sequestration's potential impact on Michigan workers

Aug 6, 2013
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In a recent opinion piece in the Lansing State Journal CEO of Capital Area Michigan Works Doug Stites wrote that the 20%  funding cuts to his agency come at a critical time when efforts to retrain Michigan workers for in-demand jobs is extremely important.  At the same time, a number of taxpayers are skeptical of the publicly funded agency's work.

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This past spring the Michigan Senate passed Bill 78, which prohibits state agencies from setting aside land to maintain biodiversity.  The bill has drawn strong criticism from various environmental groups.

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Texas-based Whole Foods recently announced plans to open a new store on Grand River Avenue in Meridian Township in 2015.  This location will put the new organic food store in very close proximity to several similar stores, including Foods for Living and the East Lansing Food Co-op.