Community

Portland church sign
Peter Whorf / WKAR

Last week's tornado damaged several churches. Current State talks with one pastor about the aftermath of the devastating storm.


Dog with collar labeled Adopt Me
wantmorepuppies / flickr

In our Neighbors in Action segment this week, we learn about the Capital Area Humane Society.


Susan Ager photo
courtesy Susan Ager

Former Detroit Free Press writer Susan Ager has written a story about Detroit for National Geographic magazine.


Mary Pline car photo
WLNS/Ionia County Sheriff's Office

Mary Pline was rescued from a submerged car in the aftermath of this week's tornado in Portland.


Paws With a Cause trains service dogs to assist people with disabilities. Current State speaks with Janey Ladd, who received her dog Colonel from Paws, and Deb Davis, community engagement manager with Paws With a Cause.


It’s Wednesday, and that means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make greater Lansing a better place. Mid-Michigan is a culturally diverse region. Lansing has long been known as a place where refugees from various parts of the world have come to build a new life. One agency at the forefront of serving refugees is St. Vincent Catholic Charities.

Wednesday on Current State means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today, we learn about the Indigenous Youth Empowerment Program (IYEP), an after school and summer program that is helping Native American and Indigenous youth in the Lansing area reclaim their cultural heritage.

 Wednesday on CS means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today, we learn about Lansing Roots, a business incubator for aspiring farmers with limited means.  To learn more about the program, Current State talks to Alex Bryan, from the Greater Lansing Food Bank, the organization behind the program.

Flickr - janeyessee

It’s Wednesday, which means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make mid-Michigan a better place. It’s estimated that there are more than two-million caregivers in Michigan. Some are health care professionals, but many others provide care for their family members at home. Even with the proper training, caregiving is stressful work, both physically and emotionally.

Courtesy MSU Living History Project

For the past year, students in MSU's School of Journalism have documented the life experiences of seniors in our state as part of the multimedia initiative "The Living History Project: Stories Told by Michigan's Oldest Old." Oldest old refers to individuals who are 85 years old or older. It's also the fastest growing age group in the United States.

NIA: Hosanna House

May 20, 2015
Courtesy of Hosanna House of Michigan

Wednesday on CS means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today, we learn about Hosanna House--an organization that works to get youth aging out of the foster care system find affordable and supportive housing. 

 Current State talks to executive director Karen Bacon and Nichole Martin, who coordinates the Michigan Youth Opportunity Initiative (MYOI) for the Department of Health and Human Services in Ingham County. 

Courtesy MSU Living History Project

For the past year, students in MSU's School of Journalism have documented the life experiences of seniors in our state as part of the multimedia initiative "The Living History Project: Stories Told by Michigan's Oldest Old." Oldest old refers to individuals who are 85 years old or older. It's also the fastest growing age group in the U.S. In our third installment of the four part series, we hear from 85-year-old Flint resident Domingo Berlanga.

Credit Courtesy MSU Living History Project

For the past year, students in MSU's School of Journalism have documented the life experiences of seniors in our state as part of the multimedia initiative "The Living History Project: Stories Told by Michigan's Oldest Old." Oldest old refers to individuals who are 85 years old or older. It's also the fastest growing age group in the US. In our second installment of this four-part documentary series, we hear from 90-year-old Holocaust survivor and Detroit area resident Katherine Sattler.

Wednesday on CS means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today, we hear about Listening Ear, an organization that offers support and counseling to people in crisis.

Courtesy MSU Living History Project

For the past year, students in MSU's School of Journalism have documented the life experiences of seniors in our state as part of the multimedia initiative "The Living History Project: Stories Told by Michigan's Oldest Old." Oldest old refers to individuals who are 85 years old or older. It's also the fastest growing age group in the U-S.

Kevin Lavery/WKAR

St. Vincent Catholic Charities in Lansing is one of the largest human service providers in Michigan. One of its core missions is caring for at-risk children. Some have direct, ongoing ties with their parents, while others are in foster care. The organization has just completed its first year of a new clinical assessment program designed to place kids in the best possible care setting.

epifanynow.org/

Wednesday on Current State means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today we look at ePIFany Now, an event coming up on Sunday. Participants will be given ideas on ways to pass kindness forward to others. Later that day, people will get back together to tell the stories of the things they did and the reactions of those they helped along the way.

CASA for Kids of Eaton and Barry County

Wednesday on Current State means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today, we welcome back to the program CASA for Kids of Eaton and Barry County, which provides volunteer advocates for kids in family court.

Wednesday on Current State means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today we learn about Sparrow’s Nest, a program which teaches life skills to homeless women and helps them become homeowners.

Mark Bashore ang guest in radio studio
April Van Buren / WKAR-MSU

Wednesday on CS means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today, we hear about a non-profit in the Lansing area that raises money for research into rare diseases. 

Kevin Lavery/WKAR

T-minus two days and counting. Two days left before the Spartan men’s basketball team strides into Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis to face Duke University in the NCAA Final Four. This is Michigan State’s fourth time in the Final Four in a decade. and they’re hoping to carve out their first national title since 2000. Thousands of people are pouring into Indianapolis by car or plane this week.

Wednesday on Current State means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today we learn about Housing Services Mid Michigan, an Eaton County organization working to find affordable housing for homeless and low-income residents.

Wednesday on Current State means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today we talk to a new Lansing organization, Helping Women Period, working to help homeless women with an often unmet need: feminine hygiene supplies.

Kevin Lavery/WKAR

Last Friday, we brought you the story of William Milzarski, a retired Army officer who was awarded the Purple Heart. He was wounded in 2011 while serving as a platoon leader in Afghanistan. While he was there, Milzarski befriended two Afghan men who worked alongside him as interpreters. Milzarski is now helping those men become American citizens.

http://rmhmm.org/

Wednesday on Current State means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today we talk about an organization you might recgonize from the donation jar if you’ve picked up a Big Mac anytime lately: the Ronald McDonald House.

Retired U.S. Army First Lieutenant William Milzarski.
WKAR/Kevin Lavery

    The Purple Heart is the oldest military award the United States of America gives to its service members.  It’s sometimes called “the medal nobody wants,” because it’s given to those killed or wounded in combat.  Now, a mid-Michigan man has joined those ranks.  First Lieutenant William Milzarski is  retired from the U-S Army.  He first enlisted back on August 1, 1990 -- the day before Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait.  He spent just a few years in as a heavy construction operator.  He was injured, got out and eventually went to Cooley Law School.

Wednesday on Current State means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today, we learn about the Mid-Michigan chapter of an organization you’re probably pretty familiar with, the Red Cross.

Last week, two key events in the arena of civil rights took place within days of each other, though one received much more attention than the other. On Thursday, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder released a stinging report on the practices of the Ferguson, Missouri police department. Three days before, a presidential task force submitted a report offering recommendations for building trust between communities and the police. Here in Michigan, a sustained effort to create that sense of trust has been quietly underway for years.

April Van Buren/WKAR

Online comment sections are rarely friendly places, especially if they have anything to do with politics. What starts as a debate quickly devolves into name calling and personal attacks. So, what is it about the Internet that seems to bring out our rudeness, and is it possible for online spaces to foster collaboration or civic engagement instead of bickering? Those are some of the topics being discussed at an upcoming forum hosted by MSU’s Center for Community and Economic Development.

Wednesday on Current State means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make Greater Lansing a better place. Today, we learn about a non-profit working to help young adults on the autism spectrum develop better social skills. Current State talks with the executive director of Autism Spectrum Partners Providing Instruction, Recreation, and Enrichment (ASPPIRE), executive director Bob Steinkamp, and program alum and current office manager and peer mentor Aileen Hecht.

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