business

Lansing business news with MLive's Angela Wittrock

Feb 18, 2013

MLive's Lansing beat reporter Angela Wittrock joins us every Monday for a rundown of the latest news about the local economy, business and development.

Courtesy of Business Leaders for Michigan

The organization Business Leaders for Michigan calls itself the state’s “business roundtable.”  It’s comprised of the top executives of Michigan’s largest corporations and universities. The organization develops strategy and advocates policy that its members believe can grow the state’s economy.  

About a year ago, Lansing voters approved a proposal to sell the 120-acre Waverly Golf Course, along with the  adjacent Michigan Avenue Park.  Last night, the Lansing City Council considered the next step -- a formal decision to sell the land.  Lansing City Councilman Brian Jeffries, who heads the council’s planning and development committee, and Lansing Township Supervisor Kathy Rodgers discuss what this means, along with the larger future involving all that park and green space on Lansing’s Westside.

Developer, MSU Trustee Joel Ferguson opens up about business and politics

Feb 11, 2013
Courtesy of MSU

Joel Ferguson has been among Lansing’s most influential people in business, politics and community service for many years.  The founder and president of Ferguson Development is also active in Democratic party politics statewide and nationally.  And he currently serves as president of the Michigan State University Board of Trustees.

Greg Kacir

This week in 1985, the Stroh Brewery Company announced that it would close its brewery on Detroit's East Side. Chairman Peter Stroh said the facility was obsolete, and it was demolished within a year.

Niowave building photo
File photo / WKARLansing Mayor Virg Bernero gave his annual State of the City address last night. We talk with Eric Lacy of the Lansing State Journal about the mayor’s remarks.

Niowave, the high-tech, particle acceleration company here in Lansing, has been growing. Its success has been a benefit in many ways to the community – more jobs, greater tax revenue, more clout in the tech world for the city.

But the company’s growth has also led to some friction.

Early last year, Niowave built a large pole barn at its headquarters, which is a former school in Lansing’s Walnut Neighborhood.

There was some good news last week in Michigan involving the fight against mortgage  fraud.  On Thursday, officials announced the state will receive $2.5 million dollars -- that’s the settlement in a mortgage fraud lawsuit filed last year by State Attorney General Bill Schuette.  The legal action involved about 1,000 victims of robo-signing statewide, with nearly 300 of them from Ingham County.  

Current State #10 | January 25, 2013

Jan 25, 2013
(Wikimedia Commons)

Today on Current State: Newly elected State Representative Tom Leonard, Prima Civitas' "Young Innovators" competition, the Lansing-made Chevy Traverse at the Detroit Auto Show, and a classical music concert guide.

Current State #1 | January 14, 2013

Jan 14, 2013
Peter Whorf / WKAR

On today’s Current State premiere: Governor Rick Snyder, East Lansing schools, Lansing business news,  MSU basketball and the new therapy dog program in Ionia County.

flickr Creative Commons / Incursion Voyages

About 65 Michigan business and civic leaders are traveling to Turkey this weekend to sign a historic partnership.  Members of the East Lansing-based Prima Civitas Foundation and the Lansing Economic Area Partnership, or LEAP, will meet with automotive parts makers and exporters in Istanbul.  There, they’ll sign two “memorandums of understanding” that will facilitate trade alliances between Michigan and Turkey. 

Ray DeWinkle is leading the Lansing area team.  He’s the senior vice-president of global business development for LEAP. 

De Winkle told WKAR’s Kevin Lavery the trip stems from a prior meeting with the head of a leading auto parts association in Turkey.

WKAR File Photo

Michigan Democratic Senator Debbie Stabenow will introduce legislation she says will lure U.S. companies who’ve moved their operations overseas back home.

Stabenow visited Lansing Community College’s west campus to announce the “Bring Jobs Home Act.”  The measure would end tax loopholes that encourage companies to leave the country, and offer a tax credit to cover 20 percent of their cost to resume operations in the U.S.  Stabenow says the tax code needs to be modified to keep workers from paying for their own companies’ move.

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