ban

UM diag photo
University of Michigan Library / flickr creative commons

The University of Michigan has won a significant decision in a lawsuit challenging a campus ban on guns.

The state appeals court says the university can regulate the possession of guns. In a 2-1 opinion, the court says a 2001 ban doesn't violate the U.S. Constitution.

The court also says the Ann Arbor school and its other campuses aren't covered by a state law that prevents local governments from putting limits on guns.

Judge David Sawyer disagreed. He says the university is exceeding its authority by adopting its own restrictions.

cross with tree branches
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

As the Trump administration prepares to enact its updated travel ban, a number of U.S. churches have stated they will offer sanctuary to refugees and immigrants.  No definitive action has taken place in mid-Michigan...but the conversation is growing.  

WKAR’s Kevin Lavery talks with Oscar Castaneda with Action of Greater Lansing what a formal sanctuary policy might look like here.

two men with beards
Courtesy / NPR

Two brothers who support President Donald Trump argued over the weekend that the president was right to place a ban on travel from seven majority-Muslim countries because Jesus Christ is “the reason this country is here and safe today.”

In an interview with NPR that was published on Sunday, brothers Tim and Bill Jackson of Elizabethtown, New York called on Americans to give the president a chance.

downtown buildings
WKAR File Photo

The city of Lansing is home to nearly 800 settled refugees from some 30 countries. An effort to declare the city a sanctuary appears to be gathering strength.


woman in MSU student lounge
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

Many Michigan State University students are trying to come to grips with President Trump’s executive order banning certain immigrants from entering the U.S.

 

The order affects people arriving from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Sudan. 

 

 

Ghazal Mehrani, a Lansing attorney of Iranian decent is helping area students to try and navigate their way through the ban. 

 

MSU student Faezah declined to give her full name.  She's Iranian.  She says the ban has everyone in her community “feeling new aspects of pain.”