automotive

Camaro photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

This weekend, General Motors is honoring the Camaro on its 50th anniversary. Current State’s Kevin Lavery gets under the hood to learn more about the venerable muscle car.


2016 Cadillac ATS Coupe
Courtesy photo / © General Motors

Cadillac’s Lansing presence remains strong for 2016. Current State speaks with chief executive engineer Dave Leone from the Detroit Auto  Show.


Camaro convertible photo
Courtesy photo / © General Motors

“Lansing strong” might be the mantra for the 2016 Camaro. Sales have been brisk and it’s built at the capital city’s Grand River Assembly. Current State's Peter Whorf speaks with Camaro Executive Chief Engineer Al Oppenheiser.


Chevy Bolt photo
Courtesy photo / © General Motors

General Motors is back in the high life again. 2015 may prove to be the automaker’s best sales year ever. The company has rebounded well in the six plus years since emerging from bankruptcy. Will GM’s success last in the new year? We talk with David Muller, automotive reporter for MLive.


Aerial view of auto assembly plant
Courtesy / Second Shift

General Motors’ 52,000 UAW workers are voting on a proposed new contract with the automaker. We get an update and explore what the agreement could mean with Crain’s Automotive’s GM beat writer Mike Colias.

The United Auto Workers Union has decided to target Fiat/Chrysler in their current round of talks with Detroit's Big Three automakers. Current State talks with Daniel Howes about the negotiations and other topics he's writing about for the Detroit  News.


Courtesy © General Motors

General Motors has been around for 106 years, and they’ve built a lot of vehicles. In fact, that number has recently surpassed 500-million. Half a billion Chevys, Cadillacs, and, of course, Lansing-built Oldsmobiles, and others. It's an amazing number. That’s far more than any other car company.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

All this week, we’ve been taking you to the Detroit Auto Show to see what’s new, what’s groundbreaking, and what’s just plain fun. On the main floor of the auto show, you can see a massive 3D printer, and it’s printing a car. And if you venture to Hall E in the Cobo Center, you can see the finished product.

Current State's Scott Pohl talks with Lee Herge, Chief Operating Officer of the Chandler, Arizona based Local Motors.

Mark Bashore/WKAR

The Detroit Auto show is in full swing in downtown Detroit. Two very different automakers are grabbing a lot of the electric vehicle attention at the Cobo Center this week. Current State's Peter Whorf has the latest on the electric cars on display at the North American International Auto Show through Sunday.

WKAR/Peter Whorf

More than one auto writer has taken to calling the Big 3 automakers “truck companies that also make cars”. Trucks and SUVs have become the most successful categories for automakers in recent years, particularly for General Motors and Ford.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

Car buffs are revving up for the North American International Auto Show in Detroit next month. More than 800,000 people attended the show at the Cobo Center last January.

New contract bargaining between the United Auto Workers union and American automakers is scheduled for next year. Recently, we’ve been getting a clearer picture of the union’s priorities. UAW President Dennis Williams has indicated members want to eliminate a recently introduced  feature of the autoworker landscape:  “two-tier” wages and benefits.

Courtesy © General Motors

Cadillac has unveiled the next model that General Motors will build in Lansing. GM is showing off the new ATS-V at the Los Angeles Auto Show this week.

gm.com

The 2014 World Congress on Intelligent Transport Systems in Detroit heard a keynote address on Sunday from General Motors CEO Mary Barra, in which she announced how GM plans to integrate automated driving technology into Cadillacs in a couple of years.

Flickr - Sherman Mui

If you were a fan of the 1980’s TV show “Knight Rider,” you’ll remember actor David Hasselhoff riding around in a modified Pontiac Firebird Trans Am that could talk, fly and even scan other vehicles. It was cutting edge TV sci-fi at the time, but so-called “smart cars” are not that far away (minus the flying, of course).

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