Watch Live: Former MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon Testify Before U.S. Senate

Jun 5, 2018

Former Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon appears Tuesday to answer questions from a U.S. Senate panel.


Click here to watch coverage starting Tuesday at 3:00 p.m. from C-SPAN.

Simon will testify under subpoena. She faces questions on how Nassar was allowed to remain MSU’s medical staff and prey on hundreds of sports medicine patients over a 20-year period. Nassar survivors say their complaints were ignored by the university.

U.S. Senator Gary Peters (D) Michigan will sit in on the hearing, and says he has questions.

“We want to know exactly, what did Michigan State know? When did they know it?," said Sen. Peters.

Sen. Peters says the findings will be used to develop policies to help combat campus sexual assaults.

Michigan State was a horrible incident, and reprehensible in so many ways, but we’ve also seen this at other universities," said Sen. Peters. "So the committee is about looking at this more broadly – what can we learn from what happened at Michigan State to apply to other universities.”

Former executives from USA Gymnastics are also scheduled to appear.

Nassar survivors testified before the Senate committee last month.Simon is scheduled to answer questions from the U.S. Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, Insurance and Data Security.

Click here to watch coverage starting Tuesday at 3:00 p.m. from C-SPAN.

Simon left her post as MSU's president  in January under pressure.

Michigan State was accused of ignoring or dismissing complaints about Nassar, some as far back as the 1990s. The school had insisted that no one covered up assaults, although Nassar's boss was later charged with failing to properly supervise him and committing his own sexual misconduct.

Nassar, 54, will be locked up for the rest of his life under three decades-long sentences for molesting athletes with his hands and possessing child pornography. He's at a federal prison in Arizona.

In addition to working at Michigan State, Nassar worked with Indianapolis-based USA Gymnastics, which trains U.S. Olympians. His assaults were mostly committed in Michigan at his Lansing-area home, campus clinic and area gyms, but his accusers also said he molested them at a gymnastics-training ranch in Texas and at national and international competitions.

In May, MSU agreed to pay $500 million to settle claims from more than 300 women and girls who said they were assaulted by sports doctor Larry Nassar in the worst sex-abuse case in sports history, officials announced Wednesday.