MSU's Faculty Athletic Representative Resigns

Jan 25, 2018

In another fallout from the Larry Nassar sex abuse scandal, Sue Carter, the Faculty Athletic Representative at Michigan State University resigned from her position. 


WKAR Digital News Director Reginald Hardwick talked with Carter about her decision. Carter is a professor of journalism at MSU. She is also a former secretary for the MSU Board of Trustees and Executive Assistant of MSU Presidents Lou Anna K. Simon and Peter McPherson. 

HARDWICK: You've resigned, why is that?

CARTER: I did resign. Over the past week and a half, I was concerned deeply about the university's response to the stories we were hearing from the victims of Larry Nassar.  It struck me that there was an ongoing lack of compassion. And I no longer wanted to be part of an administration that couldn't express the compassion and be willing to go forward.

HARDWICK: How did you come to this decision? Was there any particular moment or statement?

CARTER: I think there were two instances that really struck me. One was when President Simon appeared a week ago Tuesday in the courtroom and was unable to really let those there to testify against Larry Nassar know how sorry the university is not only for what Nassar did but for what it didn't meant to those women and those girls.

And when the Board of Trustees on Friday give her unanimous support, that struck me as wrong-headed. I didn't see any improvement or any hope for improvement in the university's compassionate response. 

HARDWICK: You're a long time member of the MSU community, this has to be a very emotional decision or a very far-reaching one?

CARTER: I came here a long time ago... I've seen a number of transitions. This university means a great deal to me. I'm a graduate. I'm the mother of a graduate. I've been an administrator, most importantly a faculty member. And taught many, many students whom I deeply respect.

HARDWICK: Do you have a response to the resignation of President Simon?

CARTER: I've known President Simon for a long time. And it saddens me that her presidency has come to this end. I was honored to be the secretary of board of trustees and executive assistant to former President McPherson and part of that transition. I have followed obviously very carefully her tenure. She's done some wonderful for the university, there's no taking away from that.  But in this instance, she and many of us failed. We'll go forward. We will learn from this experience. I think it starts with being willing to hear others. And Judge Aquilina gave us a tremendous schooling in what that means by letting people who've been harmed - speak. It's important that we really reach out in a meaningful way and be open to the narratives that come to us.