MSU, Hurley hospital partner on mitigating lead exposure in Flint

Jan 19, 2016

The political fallout from the water crisis in Flint continues to unfold, but for public health experts, the real crisis could be years down the line. We talk to Hurley Medical Center pediatrician Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha and Associate Dean at the MSU College of Human Medicine Dr. Dean Sienko about an initiative to deal with the long-term impacts of lead exposure in Flint.


Gov. Rick Snyder takes the stage for his State of the State address tonight, and the issue likely to dominate the evening is the state’s role in the Flint water crisis. The head of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has already resigned, and some Flint residents are calling on Snyder to do the same.

But while the political fallout might be taking center stage now, the health consequences of lead exposure in Flint will last much longer than the next election cycle.

A new partnership between the MSU College of Human Medicine and Hurley Children’s Hospital wants to address those long term impacts on the city’s children.

Current State talks about the Pediatric Public Health Initiative with Hurley pediatrician Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha and Associate Dean at the MSU College of Human Medicine Dr. Dean Sienko.

This segment is supported by Michigan State University's Knight Center for Environmental Journalism. More news about the Great Lakes environment can be found at GreatLakesEcho.org and on Current State every Tuesday as part of our partnership.