Kevin Lavery

News Reporter and Host

Kevin Lavery is a general assignment news reporter and produces news features and interviews for Current State. He's also an alternate local host on NPR's "Morning Edition."

Prior to coming to WKAR in 2006, Lavery was a reporter at KWMU in St. Louis, Missouri, covering local politics, government, and biotechnology issues.

Lavery's journalism career began in the Navy. He studied journalism at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana; worked as news director and television producer for American Forces Network-Japan; and served in Antarctica as radio program director at the McMurdo Station Research Facility on Ross Island.

Ways to Connect

Chevy Bolt photo
Courtesy photo / © General Motors

General Motors is back in the high life again. 2015 may prove to be the automaker’s best sales year ever. The company has rebounded well in the six plus years since emerging from bankruptcy. Will GM’s success last in the new year? We talk with David Muller, automotive reporter for MLive.


John Beck workout photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

Millions of people resolve to get in shape after the holiday merrymaking. Historically, gym and fitness club memberships spike in January, but the trick for gyms large and small is to prevent the workout from sliding into washout. Current State’s Kevin Lavery has the story.


Sen. Gary Peters photo at MSU's FRIB
Courtesy photo / Sen. Gary Peters

The omnibus spending bill Congress passed last week includes sizeable dollars for the FRIB project at MSU, and for Great Lakes restoration projects. We talk with Democratic Sen. Gary Peters about what’s in the new federal budget.


Food Processing and Innovation Center
Courtesy image / Michigan State University

Michigan is known for its strong agricultural industry. In the Lansing area, plans are moving forward to create the Michigan Food Innovation District. We talk with the two co-managers of the project, David Spencer and Brent Forsberg.


o0o0xmods0o0o / morgueFile

After nearly a decade of historically low interest rates, the Federal Reserve is tapping ever so slightly on the economic gas pedal. The Fed’s one-quarter percent rate hike is designed to head off inflation. We talk with MSU economist Charley Ballard and Community Bankers of Michigan general counsel Michael Kus about the implications of the interest rate hike for Michigan.


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