Kevin Lavery

Education Reporter

Kevin Lavery is WKAR's Education reporter. In 2018, he began a year-long focus on the challenges of improving literacy in Michigan schools.  He is also reports general assignment stories and produces news features and interviews for Current State. He's also an alternate local host on NPR's "Morning Edition."

Prior to coming to WKAR in 2006, Lavery was a reporter at KWMU in St. Louis, Missouri, covering local politics, government, and biotechnology issues.

Lavery's journalism career began in the Navy. He studied journalism at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana; worked as news director and television producer for American Forces Network-Japan; and served in Antarctica as radio program director at the McMurdo Station Research Facility on Ross Island.

Ways to Connect

stack of money
flickr/Ken Teegardin

The Michigan Legislature has approved a $57 billion budget package that includes what GOP leaders tout as the largest per-student spending increase in 17 years.  The state will crunch those numbers to prepare a final budget for Governor Snyder’s signature.  But Michigan teachers say the funding boost won’t soothe the crunch they’ve been feeling for years.

 


gun free zone sign
flickr/Mike Goad

As state lawmakers debate new school safety measures, Michigan’s largest teachers union says most of its members don’t want to be armed in school. 

 


This week's Current State focuses on an MSU's "New Day" proposal, a new sexual assault investigator in Ingham County, virtual learning in Michigan, learning everything there is to know about plants and why WKAR may be a little harder to tune in these days. 


Brian Whiston
YouTube/Michigan Dept. of Education

A colleagues of the late Michigan State Superintendent Brian Whiston is remembering him as a man of courage and conviction. 

 


sign outside office
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

The concept of “going to school” usually involves hundreds of students congregating under the same roof, studying just feet away from each other. These days, a growing number of students are trying an alternative: virtual classes.  Online education has found fertile political soil in Michigan. However, new research suggests virtual schools run virtually unchecked, while delivering poor results.

This weekend's Current State updates you on school walkouts, Adado Park in Lansing, Michigan roads, the next generation of veggie burgers and memorable moments from past Michigan State University commencement speakers. 


students bowing heads
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

There was another walkout at a mid-Michigan high school Wednesday...but not for the reason you might expect. 

 


boy at computer
flickr/Kristine Full

This week, your children may be among thousands taking the Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress, or M-STEP.  It’s the yardstick the state uses to measure a student’s proficiency in math, science, social studies and language arts. 


man and woman with books
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

The 2018 Kids Count Data Book published by the Michigan League for Public Policy ranks Livingston County as the top county in Michigan for child well-being.  Education is a key factor in a child's quality of life.

 


Reginald Hardwick, Kevin Lavery, Jamie Paisley
Peter Whorf / WKAR-MSU

WKAR, the NPR station for Michigan's Capital region, won seven awards from the Michigan Associated Press Media Editors on Sunday, April 22, 2018 in Lansing.

Bonnie Knutson and Michael Kaplowitz
Eli Broad College of Business - MSU and MSU College of Agriculture of Natural Resources

Michigan State University has named two new faculty athletic representatives.  


2018 Kids Count in Michigan: A Michigan Where All Kids Thrive
Courtesy / Michigan League For Public Policy

For more than a decade, proficiency skills among elementary students have been in steep decline, particularly in reading.  The 2018 Michigan Kids Count Data Book, released today by the Michigan League for Public Policy, sheds some light on the factors that influence a child's success in school. 


Classroom
Pixabay Creative Commons

More than two million children live in Michigan.  Their health, education and overall well-being depends largely on where in this state they live.  The  2018 Kids Count Data Book takes a look at how Michigan kids are faring.  

 

WKAR's Scott Pohl and Kevin Lavery review the findings of the 2018 Michigan Kids Count Data Book.

Kevin Lavery
WKAR-MSU file photo

This week, we’re starting a new reporting focus on education.. We are digging deeper into the numbers, searching for solutions and giving parents, educators and students a voice while holding leaders accountable.


On the April 14-15 edition: WKAR's new education initiatives; the real cost of food waste; new Shingles vaccine; perspective of a submarine pilot; the new Wharton Center season & a new film showing how MSU helped racially integrate college football.


Pages