Kevin Lavery

News Reporter and Host

Kevin Lavery is a general assignment news reporter and produces news features and interviews for Current State. He's also an alternate local host on NPR's "Morning Edition."

Prior to coming to WKAR in 2006, Lavery was a reporter at KWMU in St. Louis, Missouri, covering local politics, government, and biotechnology issues.

Lavery's journalism career began in the Navy. He studied journalism at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana; worked as news director and television producer for American Forces Network-Japan; and served in Antarctica as radio program director at the McMurdo Station Research Facility on Ross Island.

Ways to Connect

Nathan Triplett photo
Courtesy photo / City of East Lansing

Nathan Triplett leaves office next Tuesday after eight years on the East Lansing City Council and two years as mayor. We talk with Triplett about the recent election, the incoming council, and what’s next in his future.

Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

On this Veterans Day, we visit a brain injury clinic in mid-Michigan that offers assisted living services to veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

Multimodel Gateway photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

Today is the first day of intercity bus service at the new Capital Area Multimodal Gateway. Three carriers will operate from the station, which will  offer about 150 parking spaces. The new Amtrak facility will be finished later this year. We talk with CATA Assistant Executive Director Debbie Alexander.

Philip Parmelee photo
SDASM Archives / flickr creative commons

In the history of aviation, Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart get most of the glory as pioneering pilots. But this year, as you’re getting ready to ship your Christmas gifts to loved ones far away, take a moment to think about a hometown hero.  Current State’s Kevin Lavery brings you the story of Philip Parmelee, who made the very first air cargo flight.

man smoking electronic cigarette
Vaping360 / Flickr

Health care providers say there’s been a big spike in the number of minors using electronic cigarettes in recent years.  The Ingham County Health Department wants to require e-cigarette vendors to obtain a tobacco license and refuse sales to those under 18.  Current State talks with Ingham Health Officer Linda Vail about the proposal, which could go before the county commission next week.