Kevin Lavery

News Reporter and Host

Kevin Lavery is a general assignment news reporter and produces news features and interviews for Current State. He's also an alternate local host on NPR's "Morning Edition."

Prior to coming to WKAR in 2006, Lavery was a reporter at KWMU in St. Louis, Missouri, covering local politics, government, and biotechnology issues.

Lavery's journalism career began in the Navy. He studied journalism at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana; worked as news director and television producer for American Forces Network-Japan; and served in Antarctica as radio program director at the McMurdo Station Research Facility on Ross Island.

Ways to Connect

congressmen in building
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

One-third of Michigan’s Republican congressional delegation was in Lansing Monday to tout the newly passed House tax reform bill.

 


statue of priest
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

On Saturday, Nov. 18, as many as 60,000 people will come to Ford Field in Detroit to celebrate the life of Fr. Solanus Casey.  The priest who once lived in Detroit is taking a step towards sainthood.

 


Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

On this first day of firearms hunting season, Michigan hunters and wildlife officials are closely watching for cases of Chronic Wasting Disease, a fatal neurological disorder that’s affecting deer herds in some parts of the Lansing area.

 


Reginald Hardwick / WKAR Public Media

Lansing Mayor-elect Andy Schor is announcing his transition team. 

light imaging and detection
CANVAS Program / Michigan State University

Just as it did in the 20th century, Michigan is leading a transportation revolution in the 21st. 

At the former Willow Run bomber plant near Ypsilanti, the new American Center for Mobility is emerging as one of the world’s premiere test sites for self-driving cars.  The center is working with Michigan State University and other institutions across the state to train the next generation of autonomous vehicle engineers.

 


scales of justice
flickr/Chris Potter/ccPixs.com

The Ingham County Circuit Court is developing a new approach towards helping juvenile victims of human trafficking. 

 


truck and bridge
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

The day of the driverless car is gaining ground.  Fast. 

 

What was once a science fiction fantasy is exploding into a legitimate industry.  Connected vehicles have caught the attention of such companies as Tesla, Uber and even Google.  Now, add the U.S. military to that list.  In Michigan, an Army research and development lab is experimenting with cargo hauling trucks to learn how to run automated supply convoys.  The goal is to save time, fuel and human lives.  

 


Three new people are poised to become Lansing city council members in 2018. Incumbent Kathie Dunbar will return. That's the result of the November 7, 2017 election. 


two campaign signs
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

For the first time in 12 years, the city of Lansing will soon have a new chief executive.  Voters go to the polls Tuesday to choose a new mayor. 

 

Andy Schor is a former Ingham County commissioner who currently represents Lansing in Michigan’s 68th House district.  Judi Brown Clarke is a former Olympic medalist who now serves at-large on the Lansing City Council.

 


congressional district map
Courtesy / U.S. House of Representatives

A grassroots group that’s trying to reform Michigan’s political redistricting process has reached a milestone. 

 


house and sign
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

Lansing voters go to the polls on November 7.  They’ll select a new mayor and four members of the city council.  Residents will also be asked to decide on the fate of an old house that’s seen a lot of Lansing history.

 


Spartan Motor's lot of Isuzu trucks.
Skyler Ashley

A mid-Michigan vehicle design company has landed its largest contract to date. 

marijuana leaf
flickr/DonkeyHotey

A petition drive to block a new medical marijuana ordinance in Lansing has failed. 

 


colonial statehouse
flickr/xlquinhosilva

Fifty years before the Bill of Rights, a German immigrant had his day in court. 

 In 1735, newspaper publisher John Peter Zenger was accused of writing unfavorably about the New York colonial government.  Zenger won his case, because his reporting – though politically unpopular – was true. 

The Zenger case laid the groundwork for the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of the press.

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