water

Flickr - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Governors and environmentalists from around the region are gathering in Chicago this week to discuss Great Lakes issues. We check in with commentator Gary Wilson about the topics getting the most attention for September’s Great Lakes Month in Review.


Enbridge oil spill response photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

Enbridge ships 540,000 barrels of natural gas liquids beneath the Straits of Mackinac every day. The company just completed a full-scale oil spill response drill at the Straits. Current State's Kevin Lavery was there, and reports on the simulation.


Could fish farm expansion in MI hurt the Great Lakes?

Sep 15, 2015
lake trout photo
USFWSmidwest / flickr creative commons

From chinook salmon to rainbow trout, the Great Lakes are known for some of the most incredible freshwater fisheries in the world, but could they also become a hotspot of open water fish farming? We talk to Dr. Bryan Burroughs, executive director of Trout Unlimited, about why environmentalists are saying that would be a bad idea.


Grand River photo
WKAR File Photo

In Lansing we’ve all heard of the River Trail--the 20-mile plus network of paved trails alongside the Grand and Red Cedar rivers.  Thousands of walkers, runners and bikers use it yearly.  

Is it time for a Grand River ‘water trail?’

A number of river and paddling enthusiasts would say ‘yes.’

A water trail offers canoeists and kayakers a more guided paddling experience, with better-marked access points and other amenities.  Proponents say water trails can also generate tourism for communities along its route.

Satellite image of Great Lakes
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Flickr Creative Commons

Our Great Lakes Month in Review for June looks at reducing phosphorous runoff into Lake Erie and a Wisconsin town that wants to draw drinking water from Lake Michigan.


Michigan maps out 30-year water plan

Jun 17, 2015

Current State talks with Jon Allan of the Department of Environmental Quality about the plan to protect one of the state’s most treasured natural resources.

www.cleanwateraction.org/mi

In the second half of his presidency, Barack Obama has been flexing his muscles on environmental regulations. The president has proposed regulations that would significantly cut carbon emissions, one of the main contributors to climate change. But the administration isn’t just worried about air pollution and climate change, they’ve also been thinking about water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently finalized a rule that would limit pollution into streams and wetlands that are upstream of major waterways.

Wikimedia commons

Many Michigan farmers are wrapping up their spring planting this month.  But this season, there’s a cloud hanging overhead...and it’s not bringing nourishing rain.  It is, however, all about water.   Last week, the U-S Environmental Protection Agency issued its final rule on what it calls the “Waters of the United States.”  The action expands the EPA’s jurisdiction over more waterways protected by the Clean Water Act.   The agency says the action is necessary to keep the nation’s waters clean.

http://www-personal.umich.edu/

Take a look in your medicine cabinet or your shower and you’re likely to find microbeads. Those are the small plastic spheres used as exfoliants in products like face wash or toothpaste. The tiny beads have been big news since scientists found them showing up in the Great Lakes several years ago. Last week, Michigan became the latest state to introduce legislation that would ban products containing microbeads.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

Developers are about to become the owners of 30 acres of city land straddling Lansing and East Lansing. Monday evening, the Lansing City Council approved the sale of the former Red Cedar Golf Course property to Ferguson/Continental Lansing LLC. Developer Joel Ferguson and his partner Frank Kass want to build a $276-million complex at the site that could include a ten-story hotel, restaurant and housing. Part of the site would remain green space.

Are prescription drugs harming Great Lakes fish?

Jan 20, 2015
http://home.freshwater.uwm.edu/

Lots of things end up in Great Lakes that shouldn’t be there. Plastic bottles and microbeads, fertilizer runoff from farm fields, and invasive species are only a few. Now, add to that list prescription drugs. Researchers are increasingly worried about how chemicals from prescription medication could be impacting aquatic wildlife.

Researchers eye spread of invasive faucet snails

Dec 17, 2014
Courtesy Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth

The populations of an invasive snail in the Great Lakes may be increasing, according to a new study. Researchers from ten universities including Central Michigan University and Grand Valley State University have found “faucet snails” in more areas along the Great Lakes coastline than experts previously thought.

New project focuses on watersheds, green infrastructure

Dec 16, 2014
Satellite image of Great Lakes
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Flickr Creative Commons

The water cycle is pretty simple. Evaporation. Condensation. Precipitation. But when urban areas filled with buildings and parking lots get in the way, the cycle gets interrupted, and that can cause all sorts of problems, from flooding basements to sewer overflows.

http://www.michigan.gov/deq

Michigan has its share of infrastructure issues. You probably notice it most when you’re dodging potholes in your car. But while road funding has been a hot topic lately, the state has plenty of other pressing infrastructure needs. The American Society of Civil Engineers estimates that Michigan will need to invest around $15-billion in its drinking and waste water systems over the next 20 years.

Dragon boat races return to Lansing's riverfront

Sep 12, 2014
capitalcitydragonboat.com

This weekend in Lansing, boaters and rowers enact an ornate tradition dating back millennia: dragon boating. Dragon boats are long, decorated watercraft with up to 20 paddlers.

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