Science & Technology

Science and Technology

Courtesy of MSU

Michigan State University has announced a $1 million gift to the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the College of Natural Science from the family of former MSU professor Wu-Ki Tung.

The gift will establish the Dr. Wu-Ki Tung Endowed Professorship in Particle Physics, to honor the memory of the internationally known particle physicist who taught and conducted research at MSU from 1992-2007. Tung passed away in 2009.

Battery with inbuilt 'fire extinguisher' developed

Jan 16, 2017
GETTY IMAGES

From planes to phones, lithium-ion batteries have presented the danger of spontaneous fires.  New work in battery research may stop some of these fires in their tracks.

Spacex Media Gallery

Saturday morning's SpaceX California launch is successful

Driverless car photo
Paul Pytlowany / CBS 62

What’s it like to take your first ride in a self-driving car? Detroit reporter Carol Cain recalls her recent white knuckle maiden voyage in a car driven by a computer.


Temple Grandin
Jamie Paisley / WKAR

“It is never too late to expand the mind of a person on the autism spectrum.”

These are the words of Dr. Temple Grandin, who’s sometimes referred to as the best known person with autism in the world. 

That’s due to her renown in not one, but two, fields.  

Grandin has done groundbreaking work in animal welfare. She’s best known for designing humane cattle-handling facilities that are used for half the cattle in the U.S.

She is also a prolific writer and advocate for people like herself on the autism spectrum.   

Mackinac Bridge sensor photo
Kenji Anno

A Michigan State University researcher will soon attach sensors to the underside of the Mackinac Bridge. Current State’s Scott Pohl talks with Nizar Lajnef about what he hopes to learn from studying the everyday stresses on Big Mac.


Chris Thronson FRIB photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams continues to rise on the Michigan State University campus. MSU will shed some light on this gigantic project by hosting an open house this weekend. Current State’s Kevin Lavery tours the site.


Courtesy Ryan Latourette / Capitol Drones

Drones have been around for a long time.  The first true remote-controlled aircraft were developed a century ago.  Today, drones have evolved from reconnaissance patrols to recreational past times. 

M. Emin Kutay photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

MSU researcher Dr. Emin Kutay is looking for ways to use rubber from scrap tires in asphalt. Will his work lead to better roads in Michigan?

Andy Keen supercomputer photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

Michigan State University is cutting the ribbon tomorrow on its new supercomputer. Current State’s Kevin Lavery has a report.


Mercery transit photo
Greg Hewgill / flickr creative commons

On Monday, Mercury will pass between the earth and the sun. We talk with Shannon Schmoll and John French of MSU's Abrams Planetarium about the rare event.


Dr. Brad Day photo
Michigan State University photo

Michigan State University's “Tomorrow” campaign seeks to explain complex scientific research in more accessible terms.

Brian Green photo
courtesy photo / Brian Greene

What do courage and perseverance have to do with science? Lots, according to renowned theoretical physicist and author Brian Greene. He’ll explain in an address that opens the MSU Science Festival.


Tony Parenti photo
Courtesy photo / MSU Cell and Molecular Biology

Stem cells are the raw materials the body uses to build any specific type of cell. Researchers at Michigan State University say they’ve found a new type of stem cell that may be used to regenerate healthy cells. Current State talks with Dr. Amy Ralston and graduate student Anthony Parenti.


HAL 9000 photo
Alberto Racatumba / Flickr Creative Commons

Two decades ago, man met machine on the chessboard. An IBM computer called Deep Blue defeated Russian grandmaster Garry Kasparov in the opening match of six. Since then, a new algorithm has triumphed in an even more complicated game. Current State’s Kevin Lavery talks with MSU biologist and computer scientist Arend Hintze about the future of artificial intelligence.


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