politics and government

East Lansing city hall photo
WKAR Photo

The East Lansing city council will not meet tonight to swear in two council members and elect leadership for the next two years. Mayor Mark Meadows says that’s because the results of last week’s election have not yet been certified.

Mark Meadows photo
File Photo / WKAR-MSU

The East Lansing ballot proposals had a mixed result yesterday. A proposal to cut property taxes was approved, but a measure to create an income tax in the city failed. Because of that, the property tax cut will not go into effect unless an income tax gets voter approval in the future.


Aaron Stephens photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

In East Lansing, voters rejected a proposal to create a new income tax on Tuesday. The income tax would have cost residents one-percent of their income, much of which was to be offset for homeowners by the passage of a property tax cut on the ballot.


Front of Lansing City Hall building
WKAR Photo / WKAR-MSU

It’s election day in Lansing, where voters will choose a new mayor for the first time in 12 years. The race to replace Virg Bernero as mayor in Lansing comes to a head today, with state Representative Andy Schor and city council at-large member Judi Brown Clarke hoping to win the top job.


A "Vote Here" sign
File Photo / WKAR-MSU

Absentee ballots are still coming in in Lansing, where voters will choose a new mayor and four city council members Tuesday.

East Lansing City Hall
Flickr/Creative Commons

East Lansing voters will elect two city council members next Tuesday. The three candidates for the council agree on the ballot proposals that would create a new city income tax and reduce property taxes: they all plan to vote ‘yes’ on both. They differ, though, in that two of them are incumbents, each seeking a second term in office with records to run on, while the third is a 21-year-old political science and pre-law major at Michigan State University.


Voters in East Lansing will decide the fates of two proposals the city hopes will resolve long-standing financial woes next week. The city  is in debt to the tune of $190-million, a shortfall blamed on state revenue sharing cuts and growing obligations to retirees. Workforce reductions haven’t kept pace, so East Lansing officials are urging approval of dual proposals: a new income tax, paired with lower property taxes.


ShannonMcGregor.com

WKAR's Reginald Hardwick talked with Shannon McGregor, University of Utah assistant professor, who wrote an article for Buzzfeed. It said both Presidential campaigns heavily targeted Michigan voters with Facebook ads and used embedded employees from Facebook to spread their message.s


Eric Fanning photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Former U.S. Secretary of the Army Eric Fanning was in East Lansing today to campaign for Democratic congressional candidate Elissa Slotkin. Both are Michigan natives with extensive military and national security credentials.

New Lansing City Hall sign
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Lansing city hall was named in honor of former mayor David Hollister today.


Brian T. Jackson photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

The fourth ward city council seat in Lansing will have a new face next year. Incumbent Jessica Yorko decided not to run for re-election. Yorko has endorsed Brian T. Jackson’s campaign for the post.


Julee Rodocker photo
Skyler Ashley / WKAR-MSU

A former Lansing Board of Water and Light commissioner who still works in the utility industry hopes to become Lansing’s next city council member representing Ward 2. WKAR’s conversations with candidates continue with Julee Rodocker, who expresses pride in her lifetime ties to the second ward.


Rosalinda Hernandez photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Rosalinda Hernandez, a pastor at I Am Ministries in Lansing, is running for one of two at-large seats on the Lansing city council this year. Along with her ministry, Hernandez is a chaplain with the Lansing Police Department.


Kathie Dunbar photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Kathie Dunbar is running for re-election to the at-large seat she has held on the Lansing city council since late 2005. She says she wants another term because “there’s never enough time to finish what’s going on.”

Jeremy Garza photo
Courtesy photo

An 18-year plumber in Lansing hopes that union support will help him win the second ward city council seat this year. Jeremy Garza is a safety director with the Plumbers and Pipefitters Union who serves on Lansing’s Plumbing Board.


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