Nature

Dr. Stuart Gage photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

A retired Michigan State University professor takes us into the woods to listen to what nature has to say. He’s organizing an international conference at MSU this week on ecoacoustics. Current State’s Kevin Lavery has a report.


The Story of Cats | Nature

Oct 31, 2016
Nature
Courtesy of Anwar Mamon/©Plimsoll Productions / PBS

Wed. Nov. 2 at 8pm on WKAR-HD 23.1 | Join NATURE in this epic two-part event as we journey across the globe, tracking down the origins of these diverse creatures!

Kirtland's Warbler photo
Dan Kennedy / Michigan Dept. of Natural Resources

The Kirtland’s Warbler is an icon of northern Michigan.  With a brilliant yellow breast and distinctive song, the bird makes its home in young jack pine trees.  Once on the verge of extinction, a long-running conservation program is helping to restore the Kirtland’s Warbler population. Current State’s Kevin Lavery takes us up north in search of this endangered yet beloved bird.


Poweshiek Skipperling photo
Dave Cuthrell / MSU Extension

A rare butterfly that once thrived on the Great Plains is fighting for its survival in Michigan. Current State’s Kevin Lavery braves the backcountry in search of the Poweshiek Skipperling.


Moose photo
Ray Dumas / flickr creative commons

Michigan’s moose population is on the decline. That’s prompting the federal government to consider extending the animal additional protections under the Endangered Species Act. We talk with Drew Youngedyke of the Michigan United Conservation Clubs and Dan Kennedy of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.


Michigan author Doc Fletcher has kayaked thousands of miles on rivers across the midwest and written eight books about the experiences. A 2015 book included his enthusiasm for another pastime. We talk with the Northville resident about “Paddling and Pastimes: 6 Midwest Cities, the Rivers that Made Them, The Baseball Teams that Entertained Them.”


Nature: Animal Reunions

Mar 28, 2016
Courtesy of Tigress Productions / PBS

Wed. Mar. 30 at 8pm on WKAR-HD 23.1 | Get caught up in the emotion as keepers and carers reunite with the wild animals they raised.

Jenny Mensch photo
April Van Buren / WKAR

The arrival of snow means it's time for winter activities like snowshoeing. Current State's April Van Buren slipped snowshoes on for the first time at Fenner Nature Center.


Snowy owl photo
Courtesy photo / Nova Mackentley, www.nightflightimages.com

There are over 200 different species of owls, but only one that can survive the temperatures of the Arctic: the snowy owl. A small number of these owls make appearances in the Great Lakes region every year. This year, several came to Michigan earlier than expected and they were malnourished. We get an update on the snowy owls from two experts in the field.


Operation Wild

Jun 30, 2015
Panda in the field
Helen Quinn / BBC

Wed. July 1-15 at 8pm on WKAR-HD 23.1 | Join veterinarian teams around the world as they undertake groundbreaking operations to try to save animals' lives.

http://msutoday.msu.edu/

Even the most casual cable TV viewers have, on occasion, been led to ask themselves "How long could I survive in the wild without food? What could I eat?" Peter Carrington will offer those kind of insights tomorrow at Michigan State University’s Beal Botanical Garden. He's the assistant curator of the Beal Garden, where he is the edible and toxic plant specialist. He’s also been an assistant instructor in the MSU plant biology department. His free, 40-minute session is called "Weeds you can eat, and NOT."

April Van Buren/WKAR

If you’re planning your summer vacation, you’re probably going to be booking a hotel or summer cottage soon. And so will some of the winged visitors to the Horticultural Demonstration Gardens here on the MSU campus. But, lucky for them, the bees at MSU’s “bee hotels” won’t be needing reservations.

Flickr - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

The conversation around climate change often focuses on how it will disrupt human life. Scientists warn that food shortages, flooding in coastal cities, and deadly heatwaves are just a few of the potentially devastating consequences of a warming planet. But humans aren’t the only ones at risk. Even small changes in temperature could drastically alter the native habitats of plants and animals across the globe, including here in Michigan.

Courtesy Harris Nature Center

From Celandine Poppy to Jack-In-The-Pulpit, Michigan wildflowers are in full bloom this time of year. Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. you can look and learn all about Michigan blossoms in a class at Meridian Township’s Harris Nature Center.

Christopher N. Hull

Dozens of bird lovers have journeyed to Lansing’s Potter Park Zoo recently to view the area’s first nesting bald eagles in decades. The nest sits in a large tree in a marshy area in the middle of the Red Cedar river. What’s the likelihood that the birds could make that area a permanent home? Biologist Christopher Hull has his doubts. He has vield the nest and the eagles a number of times, and he thinks the eagles may be in the process of abandoning the nest now.

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