Health

http://gophouse.org/representatives/southwest/callton/

For years now, Michigan has struggled with how to implement its medical marijuana law. Voters approved legalized pot in 2008, but applying the law has been fraught with complications. Patients, caregivers, physicians, law enforcement, local and state governments and the courts all have had different concerns. The challenge boils down to how to regulate the drug and how to get it safely and responsibly to the people who are entitled to it. In recent years, Republican State Rep. Mike Callton has been in the middle of the state legislature’s effort to move forward.

Michigan office prepares for health impacts of climate change

Apr 13, 2015
Scott Pohl/WKAR

Since 2009, Michigan officials have been ramping up an effort to address the health consequences of climate change. For example, health experts anticipate greater respiratory challenges like asthma as warmer temperatures intensify smog and fuel more wildfires that emit soot. The Michigan Climate & Health Adaptation Program, MI-CHAP, is participating in a joint effort with the national Centers for Disease Control to create what it calls "climate-ready states and cities."

Proposed MI law would increase nurses’ authority

Apr 2, 2015
www.gvsu.edu/kcon

Millions of people have signed up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Will there be enough doctors for the influx of new patients? One solution to a potential doctor shortage is to give nurses with advanced training more autonomy. That’s what a bill currently in the State Senate would do. It would allow advanced practice registered nurses, or APRN's, to prescribe medication and play a more prominent role in health care.

UM study: fast food may be addictive

Mar 27, 2015
www.lsa.umich.edu/psych

A new study from the University of Michigan indicates that there may be something to those fast food cravings you get. The findings indicate that highly processed foods heavy in fat, salt, and sugar are among the most addictive foods out there.

Flickr-Masahiro Ihara

When you need to stock up on milk or fresh fruits and vegetables for the week, you probably just drive a couple miles to the nearest Kroger or Meijer. Or maybe you take a trip to your local farmers market and load up your trunk with groceries. But for 1.8-million Michiganders, it isn’t quite so easy to find healthy food. That’s the number of people living in so called “food deserts”, according to a new report from the Philadelphia based organization The Food Trust.

A Michigan State University doctoral student in neuroscience has written a book about sexual assault and how post traumatic stress disorder affects women. Apryl Pooley is the author of “Shadow Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Journey Through PTSD and Womanhood”.

Stethoscope photo
Flickr/surroundsound5000

Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns is back with his latest production. “Cancer:  The Emperor of All Maladies” is described as the most comprehensive documentary ever made about a single disease. It airs in three installments on WKAR-TV next Monday through Wednesday nights. This Thursday evening, WKAR is hosting an abbreviated look at the film. The gathering will also include presentations from local health professionals who’ll offer various perspectives on the disease.

In Michigan, there are 191 areas designated as having a mental health care health professional shortage. Only and Texas and California have higher numbers of shortages, and that has devastating consequences. New research from the Child Health Institute found that young people in rural areas are twice as likely to commit suicide than their urban peers. In two northern Michigan counties, state and local officials are trying to hard to improve mental health care access for its rural residents.

Courtesy - MSU Department of Horticulture

The first documented case of Alzheimer’s disease was recorded in 1906. Since then, scientists have struggled to understand the cause of this neurological disorder that robs the mind of normal behavior. A Michigan State University chemist believes a natural compound from a well-known medicinal plant may one day be used to treat Alzheimer’s. He’s patented that compound in the hopes of starting human clinical trials.

Flickr - torbakhopper

Earlier this week, Chris Borland, a top rookie in the National Football League last season and a San Francisco 49ers linebacker, made a rather surprising decision. After one year in the pros, he decided to step away from the sport and call it quits. His explanation was concern about the long-term effects of trauma to the head and the reality of concussions.

Courtesy University of Michigan Health System

March is colorectal cancer awareness month. Health professionals will tell you that kind of cancer can be treated quite successfully, but first it has to be detected. And to be detected, people have to know to get screened for it. That’s why this Saturday you may notice a giant inflatable colon at Briarwood Mall in Ann Arbor.

rosebennet/flickr

Once again, the future of Obamacare is in the hands of the United States Supreme Court. This summer, the court’s interpretation of four words in the Affordable Care Act will have a significant impact on the future of the law. Many Americans are counting on millions of dollars of Obamacare federal tax credits to pay for health insurance coverage. The high court’s ruling will determine whether those credits will be offered or withdrawn to residents of 34 states, including Michigan.

Kevin Lavery/WKAR

Anyone who’s ever bought or lived in an older home knows there is always something to fix. In an ideal situation, it’s a patch here, some paint there, but older homes are sometimes plagued with environmental problems that can threaten the health of their occupants. These issues run the gamut from lead paint chips to mold to leaky stoves and furnaces. A new program in Lansing is now training assessors to not only document those defects, but to help improve residents’ health.

MSU studies home treatment for blood clots

Feb 16, 2015
Flickr/La Melodie

Blood clots have been in the news lately, as Michigan Governor Rick Snyder recovers from one in his leg. The governor was hospitalized for treatment, but what if clots were better treated at home? A new MSU study will look at home versus hospital care. 

Current State’s Melissa Benmark speaks with Dr. Paul Stein, a professor of osteopathic medical specialties in MSU's College of Osteopathic Medicine, who is one of the study’s leaders.

Health experts push higher measles vaccination rate

Feb 9, 2015
Scott Pohl/WKAR

After the disease was declared ‘eliminated’ in the United States in 2000, measles is back. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control say there were 644 diagnosed cases of the disease in 2014.  That's more than in any year since 2000. So far this year, the number is at least 107, after five infants at a Chicago area day care center were diagnosed late last week.

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