MSMS time capsule photo
Kevin Lavery / WKAR

When the Michigan State Medical Society moved into its gleaming new mid-century modern headquarters back in 1959, its members buried a letter in a time capsule. In it, doctors predicted what medicine would be like in the 21st century. Yesterday, that capsule was opened.

Dr. Yong-Hui Zheng photo
Courtesy photo / MSU Department of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics

A Michigan State University research team has helped identify a protein that may show some promise in the fight to eliminate HIV infection. We talk with Dr. Yong-Hui Zheng from the MSU Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, and local journalist and HIV activist Todd Heywood.

Many of the people arrested in the United States suffer from a mental illness, and research indicates that those released from custody are four times as likely to attempt suicide when compared with those in jail. We talk with Dr. Jennifer Johnson about her research aimed at lowering the post-detention suicide rate.

A new book examines how to plan for old age with a focus on talking about aging before you get there. Current State's Melissa Benmark talks with Sharona Hoffman about "Aging with a Plan."

MI health officials discuss new vaccine waiver rules

Sep 18, 2015
Vaccination photo
Art Writ / flickr creative commons

Low vaccination rates have been linked to outbreaks of measles and whooping cough last year in several Michigan counties. That prompted the state to require parents to talk to a health professional before seeking a so-called “philosophical” exemption. So, is it working? Current State speaks with Ingham County Health Officer Linda Vail and Dr. Eden Wells, chief medical executive for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

Todd Tennis photo
Courtesy image / Ingham County Board of Commissioners

Ingham County officials may be nearing a resolution over how to provide medical services to the county’s neediest residents. That’s been an issue since participation plunged and surpluses soared at the Ingham Health Plan. Current State speaks with Ingham County Commissioner Todd Tennis about the road ahead.

9/11 memorial fountain photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR

On September 11, 2001, emergency room physician Dr. Antonio Dajer reported for his shift at what’s now called New York Presbyterian-Lower Manhattan Hospital, five blocks from Ground Zero. When the twin towers were hit, Dajer and his hospital team treated some 1,200 victims caught in the attack. We talk with Dr. Dajer about his life-changing experience on 9/11.

(Cranky) adults need nap time too, says UM study

Jul 27, 2015
Nathan / flickr creative commons

A new University of  Michigan study indicates our levels of frustration at work are lower if we get an afternoon nap. Current State's  Melissa Benmark talks with researcher Jennifer R. Goldschmied.

Current State talks with analyst Marianne Udow-Phillips about the U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding the Affordable Care Act.

Norm Knappman photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR

Current State talks with Norm Knappman of Howell about the long-term effects he has suffered after his exposure to mustard gas during World War II.

CRC report cover
Citizens Research Council of Michigan

A new report suggests that Michigan will need more family physicians in coming years.

Naeyaert and Daman with Bashore
Scott Pohl / WKAR

Continued funding for the Ingham Health Plan debated as U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare looms. Current State speaks with Tim Daman of the Greater Lansing Regional Chamber of Commerce and County Commissioner Robin Naeyaert.

Picture of the book cover
Oxford University Press

Current State's Scott Pohl talks to Paul Thompson about his new book From Field to Fork, which deals with the ethics surrounding the American food system.

Baby doll wrapped in TheraB blanket
TheraB Medical

A partnership between a Michigan State University start-up company and a Michigan-based medical sector investment firm is bringing a new treatment for infant jaundice closer to market.

Emily Stillman photo

Federal health authorities appear to be getting close to approving a vaccine against potentially fatal Meningitis B. In 2013, the disorder made national news after outbreaks at two U.S. universities with around ten confirmed cases. None were fatal.