fresh water

For our Great Lakes Month in Review, we update a pair of November’s top stories: Nestlé's request for more groundwater from Mecosta County and Michigan’s declaration of Lake Erie as “impaired.”


Christopher Taylor photo
Courtesy photo / City of Ann Arbor

For years, Ann Arbor has been cleaning up a potential carcinogen that was detected in parts of its groundwater. Last Thursday, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality toughened standards for the chemical 1,4 Dioxane. We ask Ann Arbor’s mayor for his response to the DEQ’s change and what it means going forward.


Waukesha Lake Michigan diversion image
City of Waukesha, Wisconsin

Great Lakes governors will decide in a couple of weeks whether to approve a diversion of  Lake Michigan water to Waukesha, Wisconsin. That city’s water is contaminated with radium. A Waukesha water official explains why the diversion is justified.


Flickr/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

We check in on the biggest environmental stories from around the region with commentator Gary Wilson for our February Great Lakes Month in Review segment.


Jon Allen photo
Courtesy photo / Michigan Office of the Great Lakes

Governors of the eight Great Lakes States will soon have to decide wheter or not to allow the city of Waukesha, Wisconsin to start drawing its water from Lake Michigan. The city says its water supply is tainted by radium and that Lake Michigan water is its only viable alternative, but some environmentalists worry about setting a precedent for cities outside of the basin using Great Lakes Water. We talk with Jon Allan of the Michigan Office of the Great Lakes.

Audio Pending...

Environmental Canine Services logo
Courtesy Environmental Canine Services

Environmental Canine Services is a six-year-old Michigan company that uses dogs to find pollution in water.

Michigan maps out 30-year water plan

Jun 17, 2015

Current State talks with Jon Allan of the Department of Environmental Quality about the plan to protect one of the state’s most treasured natural resources.

Slimy microorganism increasing in northern Michigan lakes

Mar 24, 2015
Courtesy - Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry

Scientists are noting increased numbers of a zooplankton in some inland lakes that are just plain slimy. Holopedium glacialis is a mucus-coated microorganism that, in groups, makes a ball of slime something like clear tapioca pudding. The slime can clog water pipes and disrupt the food web.

Flickr - gbozik photography

With snow piled deep across the Great Lakes region, there are hopes that the upcoming melt will push lake levels higher. It’s a scenario envied by many in the American west, especially in California where residents are being hammered by the severest drought in three decades.