Education

More than a half million Michigan public school students have now completed their first M-STEP tests. The Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress replaced the MEAP assessment beginning in April. M-STEP is designed as an online assessment that covers content from the more demanding Common Core curriculum.  It has fewer multiple choice questions and more that require problem solving and critical thinking skills.

School’s out for summer! Today marks the last day of school for many districts, including the Lansing School District. As students clean out their lockers and say goodbye to friends, many will be looking forward to summer camps and family vacations. But for some kids, particularly those who are low-income, enriching summer activities aren’t always accessible. And that can have a huge impact on their academics come fall because of something called the “summer slide”. That’s the term used to describe the learning losses kids experience over the summer.

Office of Kevin Cotter

  Road funding, education spending and other budget issues are among the focus of discussions at the state capitol.   There were several developments yesterday in education spending.  A measure meant to bridge the funding gap between school districts emerged.   Meanwhile, a focus in the road funding debate continues to be whether the money for a fix can be found among existing revenue or if new revenue is required.

The economy in Michigan is on the upswing, and education budgets that were cut during the great recession are starting to increase again. But despite some funding boosts, educational achievement in Michigan has remained fairly stagnant in the past 10 years. And that’s meant that some of the states that used to trail Michigan, like Tennessee and Florida, are now ahead of us in national rankings. Advocates says Michigan students are unlikely to catch up without substantial changes to the state’s educational policy.

http://www.fijiabroad.com/

Say the words “climate change,” and the first thing that might come to mind is melting polar ice caps. That’s an accurate image, but of course, climate change affects the entire planet. Scientists say the rising tides from all that melting ice have to go somewhere, and some Michigan State University students are watching one remote part of the world that’s starting to see some effects.

Pages