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Current State #157 | September 12, 2013

Sep 12, 2013

Today on Current State: a GOP advisor addresses Tea Party criticism; the Lansing Symphony Orchestra season opener; a pioneering teacher explains the World Peace game and MSU jazz musician Etienne Charles goes 'Creole Soul' searching.

Michigan GOP advisor addresses inter-party tension

Sep 12, 2013
Wikimedia Commons

Republicans in Michigan and around the country are locked in an intense debate over the party’s direction and priorities.   

 

Recently, internal tensions affecting the party encourage state Democrats over their election prospects in 2014.  Last week, the party leaked a memo describing the Michigan GOP as “coming apart at the seams.”  

 

Wikimedia Commons

    

The Lansing Symphony Orchestra’s first MasterWorks concert is Friday night at Wharton Center. It features music of Dvorak and Enescu and a modern percussion concerto by Jennifer Higdon.

 

WKAR’s Melissa Benmark spoke with conductor Timothy Muffitt about the concert.

 

 

Imagine if we could solve all the world’s problems in a few weeks—global warming, famine, diseases, ethnic tensions—all resolved. Sounds impossible, right? Well, apparently it’s not -- at least, not for John Hunter’s students.

Over 30 years ago, the Virginia-based teacher created the World Peace Game. To play, students take on the role of world leaders and are charged with solving 50 interlocking problems. Students win if they fix all 50 crises and every country's asset value increases.

Hunter has written a book and given a Ted Talk about The World Peace Game. He and his students were also featured in the 2010 documentary World Peace and Other 4th-Grade Achievements.  Hunter spoke on Wednesday for the Residential College of Arts and Humanities Wednesday Night Live Series.

Courtesy MSU School of Music

 This summer, MSU assistant professor Etienne Charles debuted his fourth album, called "Creole Soul." It’s received favorable reviews from The New York Times and NPR, and spent some time high up on the jazz charts. Charles, who is also one of the MSU Professors of Jazz, will be playing some of his music at the Broad Art Museum on Thursday night.