courts

Scott Pohl/WKAR

Last month, 40-year-old Richard Bernstein was elected to the Michigan Supreme Court. He’s widely known for his work with his father’s Michigan-based law firm. His brother and sister are also part of the Sam Bernstein team, and all are well known from the firm’s television advertising.

Flickr - James Joel

This is an important time of year for the legal profession. Both the U-S and Michigan Supreme Courts begin hearing oral arguments this week. The American judicial system traces its roots back to English common law. And now, an iconic symbol of our legal heritage has come to Ann Arbor for public display.

http://cc.ingham.org/

In the last thirty years, a Lansing resident by the name of David Lee Arnold has been convicted of indecent exposure 17 times, that’s according to the Lansing State Journal. Today, Arnold will appear in Ingham County Circuit Court to receive his sentencing for exposing his genitals at three different coffee shops in East Lansing and Meridian Township since 2013. Current State has learned that it’s expected that part of his sentencing agreement with Judge Rosemarie Aquilina today will include the requirement that Arnold must be injected with a medication called Depo-Lupron. Both Arnold’s attorney and the Ingham County Prosecutor’s office declined to comment.

http://dc.ingham.org/

Michigan courts, especially District Courts, assess criminal defendants all sorts of fines and fees. This revenue is crucial for cities and counties, and these fines and fees vary widely across Michigan. Ingham County relies on them for $800,000 of its annual budget. The District Court in East Lansing, according to city budget numbers, has netted the city $3-million a year for the past three years. It’s one of the only departments that actually makes money for the city.

Flickr/Kim Daram

If you commit a crime, get caught, do your time, pay your debt to society, rehabilitate your life, and give back to the community, how long should you have to live with that criminal record? For many ex-offenders, the answer is for the rest of their lives. And that record creates all sorts of roadblocks, from gainful employment to obtaining child custody to the ability to receive a student loan. 

But there is a process by which certain ex-offenders can clean up their criminal records. It’s called expungement.

Flickr - SalFalko

The U. S. Supreme Court hears arguments today that will help determine the scope of what kinds of emissions the Environmental Protection Agency can regulate. The outcome could have a big effect on industrial facilities nationwide.

State's high court seeks more language interpreters

Feb 5, 2014
www.courts.mi.gov

The American legal system is littered with ancient Latin terms. Phrases like “habeus corpus,” “ex post facto” and “pro bono” are common in our courts. Many of us who are not lawyers and judges have some idea what they mean, but imagine trying to grasp what’s happening in a courtroom when English is not your first language. At best, the experience can be stressful and even frightening without an interpreter.

Joe Linstroth/WKAR

On the night of April 19, 1989, a young white woman was raped in Central Park and left for dead. New York City was outraged by the crime. The next day police arrested 5 Black and Latino teenagers, and the media frenzy began.

Ingham judge blasts Court of Claims move

Nov 11, 2013
Flickr - cmu chem prof

A controversial bill that would move a key Michigan court is expected to be signed into law soon by Governor Rick Snyder.  The measure would transfer the operations of the state’s Court of Claims to the Michigan Court of Appeals. The court of claims hears legal actions that are filed against the state of Michigan.

senatorrickjones.com

Republicans in the Michigan legislature are pursuing change at the state’s Court of Claims.  That’s the judicial body that decides legal actions against the state.

Michigan looks to expand mental health courts

May 17, 2013

Earlier this month, a group of House Republican lawmakers introduced a four-bill package that would create a permanent system of mental health treatment courts in Michigan.

s_falkow / flickr creative commons

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is taking the state’s ban on affirmative action to the U.S. Supreme Court. Schuette filed paperwork Thursday asking the high court to take the case.  

southerfried / morgueFile

A U.S. Supreme Court decision banning automatic life sentences for juveniles does not apply to those already serving in Michigan.  

s_falkow / flickr creative commons

Some universities in Michigan say they're taking a wait-and-see approach on how to proceed a day after a federal appeals court threw out the state's voter-approved ban on affirmative action in college admissions.

Kevin Rosseel / morgueFile

The U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has struck down Michigan’s voter-approved ban on race-based affirmative action in state university admissions and public employment. 

A court has ruled the former assistant attorney general who was fired for harassing a gay student leader at the University of Michigan is entitled to unemployment benefits.

Kevin Rosseel / morgueFile

Judges on a Michigan Court of Appeals panel say state lawmakers should figure out how to comply with a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on so-called “juvenile lifers.”

WKAR File Photo

The Michigan Supreme Court heard arguments Thursday on the future of medical marijuana dispensaries and growing cooperatives.

WKAR file photo

The state Senate Judiciary Committee opens hearings Tuesday on a plan to fix Michigan’s public defender system.

Kevin Rosseel / morgueFile

The Michigan Court of Appeals has ruled unconstitutional a state law forcing school employees to pay 3% of their salary toward retiree health care.

southerfried / morgueFile

The state appeals court is siding with a group that opposes the expansion of casino gambling in Michigan.

southerfried / morgueFile

A battle over how Republicans in the Michigan House of Representatives count votes was argued Wednesday before the state Court of Appeals.

Courtesy / Ingham County

A ruling last week by the U.S. Supreme Court has confusing repercussions for a recent court decision in Lansing.  The high court ruled that laws like Michigan’s that sometimes mandate life sentences for juveniles found guilty of serious crimes are unconstitutional.

In January, a jury found 15-year old Charles Lewis Junior of Lansing guilty of accomplice to murder, a felony. WKAR’ Mark Bashore spoke with Ingham County Judge George Economy to clarify how the ruling impacts Lewis’ sentence.     

Kevin Rosseel / morgueFile

The Michigan Court of Appeals says the state Department of Human Services can cut off cash assistance welfare benefits to people who hit the federal time limit – even if they have time remaining on their state benefits.

southerfried / morgueFile

Arrangements are being made to return more than 350 Michigan inmates to the courts where they were sentenced. The prisoners will get new sentences under a U.S. Supreme Court decision this week.

The Michigan Supreme Court has heard oral arguments in a case that questions the constitutionality of a Michigan State University ordinance.