climate change

Climate Change Transforming Great Lakes Forests

Nov 24, 2017
Samantha Harrington / GREAT LAKES TODAY

To illustrate the future impact of climate change, he gives the landowners red and green ribbon and sends them into the woods. Trees projected to decrease in population, like sugar maple and balsam firs, get marked with red ribbon. Trees projected to increase, like bur and white oak, get a green ribbon. 


Scott Crandall performance photo
Melissa Kaplan

Can the arts influence thinking on scientific debates like the discussion surround climate change? A program in Lansing this week aims to do exactly that. It's called “Hope Takes the Stage.”


This week on Current State, we speak with a Lansing woman whose family was affected by Hurricane Irma. Also an MSU professor explains the intensity of this year's hurricanes. Learn how spiders and two Michigan companies are working to protect members of the military. Learn why Charlotte might be cheering for the Dallas Cowboys these days. Plus, the story of buying Spartans gear that turned emotional.


City of Houston, Texas after Hurricane Harvey
Katie Hayes Luke / NPR

Nathan Moore, associate professor of the Department of Geography, Environment and Spacial Sciences at Michigan State University talks with WKAR's Brooke Allen about Hurricane Harvey's impact on Houston. 


WH.gov

A Michigan State University professor and a Democratic congressman from Michigan reacted to President Trump's withdrawl of the United States from the Paris climate change accord.  


Fickle weather forces MI ski resorts to adapt

Feb 16, 2017
Snow making machine at ski area
Chochtopf / Pixabay

Temperatures are forecast to reach the 50’s in much of Michigan over the next week.

Skiers and snow boarders might be excused for not planning an outing.

Dan Coles has studied the snow ski industry at Michigan State University.                     

“We’re seeing less regular winter patterns in our weather," he says.  "It makes it more difficult to rely on.”

He says more Michigan operators today deliberately offer more than skiing.

“You know, you can visit the spa," he says.  "You can visit some of their other attractions.”

dry grass photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR

Last week’s arrival of summer brought us the seasonal forecast on Current State. Dr. Kirk Heinze talks with MSU climatologist Jeff Andresen.


Lake Superior shore at Porcupine Mountains photo
Chris Heald / flickr creative commons

New research suggests that the world’s lakes are experiencing dramatic temperature shifts due to climate change. So, how will our own Great Lakes fare in a warming climate? We talk to John Lenters, a researcher at the water science consulting firm LimnoTech to find out.


Aaron McCright photo
Courtesy photo / MSU Department of Sociology

Global leaders are gathering in Paris this month to try and reach an agreement on curbing climate change. But a new study from MSU suggests those urging action on the issue in the U.S. may have a hard time convincing skeptics. We talk to MSU sociologist Aaron McCright about why climate change skeptics may be winning the war of public opinion.


smokestacks photo
Quinn Dombrowski / flickr creative commons

Environmental groups in Michigan are expressing pleasure with the EPA's new Clean Power Plan. Others, though, have their doubts. Current State talks with Andy Such of the Michigan Manufacturers Association and Frank Macchiarolo of America's Natural Gas Alliance.


Jeff Andresen photo
Courtesy MSU Today

"Greening of the Great Lakes" host Kirk Heinze talks with state Climatologist Jeff Andresen at the Michigan Sustainability Conference.


hurricane photo
Chuck Simmins / flickr creative commons

A nationwide study out of the University of Michigan finds that people are more likely to believe in global warming after they personally witness extreme weather events. Current State talks to Dr. Barry Rabe, co-director of the National Surveys on Energy and Environment, which produced the report. 

Dr. Andrew Hoffman is the Holcim Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan. His new book "How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate" examines ways in which non-scientific views shape opinion on the subject of global climate shifts.

US scientists urge more research on climate engineering

Feb 17, 2015
http://aoss.engin.umich.edu/

Machines that suck carbon out of the air. Fertilizing the ocean with iron to stimulate phytoplankton. Spraying sulfate particles into the atmosphere to reflect the sun and cool the earth. These scenarios might sound like science fiction, but they are increasingly being considered by scientists as a potentially necessary tool in the fight against climate change.

How do the media shape perceptions of climate change?

Nov 12, 2014
http://cas.msu.edu

Warnings about the climate change have gotten increasingly dire over the past decade. In its latest report, released earlier this month, the International Panel on Climate Change says mitigating the effects of global warming will require immediate action. But while a majority of Americans believe climate change is happening, most don’t think it will have an impact during their lifetime, and some think that’s why belief hasn’t necessarily translated into political will. The scientific community continues to push for action.

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