climate change

dry grass photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR

Last week’s arrival of summer brought us the seasonal forecast on Current State. Dr. Kirk Heinze talks with MSU climatologist Jeff Andresen.


Lake Superior shore at Porcupine Mountains photo
Chris Heald / flickr creative commons

New research suggests that the world’s lakes are experiencing dramatic temperature shifts due to climate change. So, how will our own Great Lakes fare in a warming climate? We talk to John Lenters, a researcher at the water science consulting firm LimnoTech to find out.


Aaron McCright photo
Courtesy photo / MSU Department of Sociology

Global leaders are gathering in Paris this month to try and reach an agreement on curbing climate change. But a new study from MSU suggests those urging action on the issue in the U.S. may have a hard time convincing skeptics. We talk to MSU sociologist Aaron McCright about why climate change skeptics may be winning the war of public opinion.


smokestacks photo
Quinn Dombrowski / flickr creative commons

Environmental groups in Michigan are expressing pleasure with the EPA's new Clean Power Plan. Others, though, have their doubts. Current State talks with Andy Such of the Michigan Manufacturers Association and Frank Macchiarolo of America's Natural Gas Alliance.


Jeff Andresen photo
Courtesy MSU Today

"Greening of the Great Lakes" host Kirk Heinze talks with state Climatologist Jeff Andresen at the Michigan Sustainability Conference.


hurricane photo
Chuck Simmins / flickr creative commons

A nationwide study out of the University of Michigan finds that people are more likely to believe in global warming after they personally witness extreme weather events. Current State talks to Dr. Barry Rabe, co-director of the National Surveys on Energy and Environment, which produced the report. 

Dr. Andrew Hoffman is the Holcim Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan. His new book "How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate" examines ways in which non-scientific views shape opinion on the subject of global climate shifts.

US scientists urge more research on climate engineering

Feb 17, 2015
http://aoss.engin.umich.edu/

Machines that suck carbon out of the air. Fertilizing the ocean with iron to stimulate phytoplankton. Spraying sulfate particles into the atmosphere to reflect the sun and cool the earth. These scenarios might sound like science fiction, but they are increasingly being considered by scientists as a potentially necessary tool in the fight against climate change.

How do the media shape perceptions of climate change?

Nov 12, 2014
http://cas.msu.edu

Warnings about the climate change have gotten increasingly dire over the past decade. In its latest report, released earlier this month, the International Panel on Climate Change says mitigating the effects of global warming will require immediate action. But while a majority of Americans believe climate change is happening, most don’t think it will have an impact during their lifetime, and some think that’s why belief hasn’t necessarily translated into political will. The scientific community continues to push for action.

Flickr - Parker Knight

If you’ve found yourself putting on a sweater or light jacket on cool evenings this summer, you’ve probably wondered what’s going on with the weather. The polar vortex that visited us so harshly last winter made a return visit a few weeks ago, dropping temperatures below normal. It turns out that there’s at least one upside to climate change; one that could help our farm economy.

Flickr - Ken Hawkins

Most people are aware of the “sexy” greenhouse gas CO-2. Fewer know of its co-culprit nitrous oxide. The third-largest greenhouse gas, after carbon dioxide and methane, nitrous oxide is released in soil during a natural process. However, the increased use of nitrogen fertilizer in agriculture has resulted in a rise of nitrous oxide emissions.

Models help communities plan for climate change

Mar 11, 2014
Flickr - Sagittariuss

Trying to determine the impacts of climate change is a difficult task. There are hundreds of different factors which could determine how communities are influenced. To more effectively understand the challenges associated with climate change, scientists are using system dynamics models. Current State’s Emanuele Berry spoke with Laura Schmitt-Olabisi, an ecologist and modeler at Michigan State University, about her latest project that explores how higher temperatures could impact Detroit.

Exhibit preserves artifacts of endangered places

Mar 10, 2014
Courtesy of sinkingandmelting.tumblr.com

Many scientists predict that as climate change becomes more extreme, dry and coastal regions around the globe will be heavily impacted by drought and rising sea levels.  Entire communities could disappear.

The link between climate change and violence

Aug 8, 2013
Courtesy/Solomon M. Hsiang

On June 25, President Obama released a comprehensive plan to fight climate change.

The plan pointed out that last year was the warmest year on record for our country. While the efforts to fight against climate change continues, researchers seem to have found another reason to prevent climate change: violence.