Literature can be a window into the history and culture of the place where it is written. Current State talks to freelance journalist Anna Clark about her new book exploring Michigan’s “literary luminaries.”

We writers tend to take short stories for granted. They are practice. They are something students do in a class. They are throwaway ideas for a collection or a blogsite. Most recently, publishers have been asking authors to create short stories as a means for introducing a novel to an audience, sort of an awkward attempt at a prequel. Check out this free short story, now come back and buy the book!

Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, John Dos Passos.

John Hermann. A few of those names are more familiar than the last one, but John T. Hermann was indeed a member of the influential “lost generation” of writers.  And the author, who wrote a book that was banned in 1926, grew up in Lansing.

Brittany Gibbons is a writer and performer who has made a name for herself in the arena of positive self image, specifically regarding women considered to be plus-sized. Tonight, she’ll appear at the Schuler book store in the Eastwood Towne Center to talk about her book, “Fat Girl Walking: Sex, Food, Love and Being Comfortable in Your Skin…Every Inch of It.”

Courtesy Michigan Radio

The 28th Rally of Writers is Saturday in Lansing. The annual one-day conference will bring together leading Michigan writers like “Bootstrapper” author Mardi Jo Link, author and WKAR book reviewer Lev Raphael and others with audiences who love reading and aspire to write themselves. The keynote speaker will be Jack Lessenberry, whose essays on Michigan politics are seen in publications across the state and heard on our Michigan Public Radio Network sister station in Ann Arbor, Michigan Radio.