MSU Today with Russ White

Sundays at 4 p.m. on AM 870

MSU Today is a lively look at MSU-related people, places, events and attitudes put into focus by Russ White.  Conversations with Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis are featured, too.  And Dr. Kirk Heinze shares his sustainability-focused Greening of the Great Lakes conversations.  MSU Alumni Association leader Scott Westerman shares his observations on living the Spartan Life.

Hesterman at trade show
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A national leader in sustainable agriculture and food systems founded the Fair Food Network about 15 years ago.  Among the network’s goals is to provide healthy, fresh food to underserved communities like Detroit.


Kirk Heinze welcomes Dianne Byrum, Doug Buhler and Marc Schupan to Greening of the Great Lakes for the program’s annual sustainability roundtable discussion to share their expertise and insights on some of the key economic, environmental and social issues facing Michigan, the Great Lakes region and the United States.


MSU AgBioResearch and MSU Extension “have been collaborating for over a century, and they continue to partner to help address some of the most complex food, energy and environmental issues of our time,” says Greening of the Great Lakes host Kirk Heinze as he welcomes AgBioResearch director Doug Buhler and MSU Extension director Jeff Dwyer to the program.


“If I had to boil it down to a couple phrases that people might understand, I would say number one is zero emissions, which points to electrification of the vehicle.  And two is the quantum increase in computing power and sophistication of electronics in the vehicles,” Detroit News columnist and associate business editor Daniel Howes tells Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes in describing the evolving definition of mobility as it relates to the automotive industry.


“I think there will be some impact, but I don’t think the impact will be as great as people think or people thought when they voted for him (President-elect Trump),” Plunkett Cooney environmental attorney Saulius Mikalonis tells Kirk Heinze on Greening of the Great Lakes.  “I think renewables like wind and solar are already in place.  The investments have been made.  They’re now cheap, especially compared to new coal.  So they’re not going away anytime soon.”


“One of the things we’re really pleased about is the progress with the capital campaign and the fact that our faculty, staff and retirees last year made commitments for more money than any other set in the Big Ten, which given the relatively low position of faculty salaries compared to the Big Ten, is just an extraordinary testament to what those who are here every day believe is important for the future of Michigan State,” Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon tells Russ White on MSU Today in recapping what stood out to her this semester.


MSU Today | December 4, 2016

Dec 4, 2016

Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis talk with the new dean of MSU's College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Ron Hendrick, Spartans baseball coach Jake Boss, and MSU men's tennis coach Gene Orlando.


Spartans Baseball Coach Jake Boss joins Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis for the trio’s annual MSU Today conversation.

Boss says he’s proud of the young men he’s developing in the MSU baseball program.  And he details the 2017 First Pitch Dinner.  The 12th annual event will take place on Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017 at the Kellogg Center in East Lansing.


MSU men’s tennis coach Gene Orlando is bullish on the future of his sport.

“The evolution of the equipment and the pace of the game are stronger, and the players are more athletic.  The game keeps getting better and stronger,” Orlando tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today.


MSU Today | November 27, 2016

Nov 27, 2016
Mackenzie Mohr

Holiday food safety tips and eating trends; selecting, caring for, and properly disposing of your real Michigan Christmas tree; the MSU Shadows project turning downed trees into furniture and works of art; why endowed chairs and professorships are so important to MSU’s future. 


msutoday.msu.edu

Fraser fir, Scotch Pine, Blue Spruce and White Spruce are just a few of the tree varieties grown in Michigan and shipped across the Midwest, Texas and Florida each holiday season says MSU Christmas tree expert, Dr. Bert Cregg.  “And harvests start as early as late October.”

Cregg, a professor in the Departments of Horticulture and Forestry at Michigan State University, talks with Greening of the Great Lakes host, Kirk Heinze.


“There’s an authenticity about MSU that I haven’t felt other places I’ve been,” Ron Hendrick tells Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis on MSU Today.  Hendrick is an alumnus and has returned to his alma mater to be dean of MSU’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

“Clearly the campus has undergone a lot of transformations, but it’s good to see the core values that make the place so special the same.”


MSU Today | November 13, 2016

Nov 13, 2016

A pro-trade conversation with two Michigan agriculture leaders; Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon and Spartans Athletic Director Mark Hollis talk with the new dean of MSU College of Law Larry Ponoroff; a heating and cooling expert offers home energy efficiency tips for the winter; Scott Westerman shares his Career Quick Reference.


Every family has their holiday traditions, and with the growing amount of foodborne illnesses each year, it’s important to take food safety into consideration while preparing festive meals.

Michigan State University Extension food safety educator, Joyce McGarry, leads the food safety education efforts at MSU Extension. By sharing knowledge about how consumers can properly cook, store and save foods, she hopes fewer individuals will get sick from bad bacterias.


The Michigan Energy Innovation Business Council (EIBC) recognized three companies and three individuals, including two state lawmakers, for their contributions to growing Michigan’s clean energy economy at the annual Energy Innovators Gala Thursday, November 10.

Greening of the Great Lakes was on hand to talk with event organizers and honorees.


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