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NPR's Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted nationally by NPR's Steve Inskeep, David Green, and Rachel Martin with WKAR's Brooke Allen in East Lansing, MI.

Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A law passed after the Exxon Valdez oil spill requires the government to assess the biological damage from big spills so fines can be fixed and damage paid for. The National Academy of Sciences has a report describing the methods and metrics of determining the "ecosystem services" that have been lost due to the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Veterans Day Conversation

Nov 11, 2011

On this Veterans Day, Steve Inskeep talks with General Eric Shinseki, Secretary of Veterans Affairs, about veterans returning from war and trying to find employment in a tough economy.

Michigan is expected to be a battleground in next year's presidential election. The state has a double-digit jobless rate but also has an auto industry that's being revived after getting federal help in 2009. President Obama points to that as a success story. But Republican candidates maintain the bailout was a bad idea. Among them, former Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney — a Michigan native whose father once ran a car company.

Warning: Some of the content included here may be disturbing.

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor. Thousands of Americans were killed that day. But Frank Curre, who was just a teenager when he enlisted in the Navy, survived the onslaught.

"When I got out of high school, I went looking for a job. Couldn't find it, so I told Mama, 'I'm joining the Navy — and you've got to sign the papers, because I'm only 17.' I said, 'If you don't sign the papers for me, Mama, I'll go downtown and get a hobo to sign 'em.' "

Listener Picks: Songs You Turn Up To 11

Nov 11, 2011

Christmas Tree Fee Causes Uproar

Nov 10, 2011

The Obama administration put off a plan to collect a fee on Christmas trees. An industry group asked for the fee, 15 cents per tree. Conservatives denounced what they labeled a tax on Christmas trees. The White House defended the fee, saying it's not a tax at all. All the same, the administration says it will delay collecting the money.

Had Wednesday's first nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System been a real alert, some may have been left in the dark. Instead of that irritating tone interrupting television and radio programming, some TV viewers heard Lady Gaga singing "Paparazzi." Others had their programming switched to QVC, a home shopping channel.

Part three of a four-part series, Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities.

The smokestack stands more than nine stories above the southeastern Kansas prairie and the small city of Chanute, and it's bright, white flashing lights are like a beacon in the night sky.

The Last Word In Business

Nov 10, 2011

Renee Montgne has the Last Word in business.

Business News

Nov 10, 2011

Steve Inskeep has business news.

House Republicans have released emails related to solar panel maker Solyndra which got $535 million in government loan guarantees and then went bankrupt. Republicans say the emails show an Obama campaign bundler used his influence at the White House to make the loan happen.

The Obama administration's first attempt to try a Guantanamo detainee in a military commission began Wednesday with the arraignment of the man accused of masterminding the bombing of the U.S.S. Cole. The incident killed 17 servicemen and women in Yemen in 2000. Human rights groups object to trying terrorists in a parallel justice system hundreds of miles off U.S. shores.

Jefferson County, Ala., Files For Bankruptcy

Nov 10, 2011

Alabama's most populous county has filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. Jefferson County commissioners voted to declare bankruptcy after years of squabbling with creditors over $4 billion in debt.

A reunion of art is taking place in Paris right now. Works that haven't been there together in almost a century are reunited once again. The art was collected by writer Gertrude Stein and her brothers starting in the early 1900s. The Steins bought paintings right out of the studios of young avant-garde artists — Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and others who would become masters as the 20th century progressed.

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