Morning Edition on 90.5 WKAR

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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Food
5:08 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Uruguayan Soccer Team's Caramel Spread Denied Entry Into Brazil

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 7:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And let's stay with the World Cup in Brazil, where Uruguayan fans and media are crying foul - not on the soccer pitch, but involving Brazil's customs.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Customs officials confiscated more than 80 pounds of a favorite snack spread from Uruguay's soccer team, one of the World Cup favorites, when they entered the country last week. The spread, called dulce de leche, is like the Nutella of South America. You can spread it on bread; use it as ice cream topping.

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Around the Nation
7:26 am
Tue June 17, 2014

FBI Has Its Own Twitter Slang

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The FBI is a serious agency doing serious business, and apparently to conduct that business, agents need to know what ONUD stands for in the Twitter-sphere. That would be, oh, no, you didn't. A Freedom of Information request has forced the FBI to open its internal guide to shorthand on Twitter and other social media, which includes LFBBEG - looking for big, bad evil guy. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Education
6:07 am
Tue June 17, 2014

City Council In Sweden To Decide The Fate Of Homework

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:26 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Schools out for millions of American kids - no more homework for a couple of months. Students in a town in central Sweden may be doing even better. The city council is debating whether to do away with homework entirely. Local officials argue that students should be able to learn everything they need during school hours and, says one, not burden their parents with it. Now there's a thought. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
5:33 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Sherr's Book Reveals Details Of Astronaut Sally Ride's Personal Life

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:26 am

Linda Wertheimer talks to journalist Lynn Sherr about her friendship with the late Sally Ride. Sherr has written a book, Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space.

NPR Story
5:33 am
Tue June 17, 2014

The Human Heart And Its Rhythmic Magnificence

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 8:18 am

Rhythm comes in different forms from music and poetry to those inside our bodies. There's art based on the most primal rhythm of all: the beating of the human heart.

NPR Story
5:33 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Third Time's A Charm: U.S. Beats Ghana In World Cup Match

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:26 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:33 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Delta Airlines Apologizes For World Cup Tweet

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:26 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And today's last word in business is, giraffe gaffe. Delta Airlines joined many others on twitter yesterday, congratulating the U.S. men's soccer team for their dramatic World Cup win over Ghana.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The airline included images in its tweet - the statue of liberty to symbolize America and a giraffe for Ghana.

WERTHEIMER: Only problem - there are no giraffes in Ghana. Delta later tweeted out an apology.

Around the Nation
5:33 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Florida's New Regional Rail Service Raises Residents' Concerns

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:26 am

Florida East Coast Railway plans to start construction on an passenger line linking Miami with Orlando. Residents in towns through which the train passes worry about the impact on their communities

Around the Nation
7:20 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Rescuer Goes Out On A Limb To Save Cat

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Cats know how easy it is to get up a tree and firefighters know how hard it can be to get down. Yesterday in Pennsylvania, firefighters rescued a cat and its rescuer. Stuck in the top branches was Tara Dennis. The Erie Times-News reports that after hearing the cat cry for a couple of days, she'd gotten up on a roof, crawled out on a branch, tucked the cat into her shirt and then a neighbor had to call 911 to rescue her. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:20 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Bachelor Party Attendees Make Rare Discovery

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:56 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. It was not a team of paleontologists but a group of stags who made a rare discovery recently in New Mexico - make that a stag party. T hey were cruising by the lakeshore at Elephant Butte State Park when they discovered the skull of a mastodon with teeth and tusks intact. The prehistoric elephant lived about 3 million years ago, predating both the woolly mammoth and the earliest-known bachelor party. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Afghanistan
6:52 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Afghan Voters Defy Taliban Threat; Vote In Presidential Runoff

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 9:46 am

Afghans went to the polls on Saturday to vote for a successor to Hamid Karzai who's ruled since 2001. Former foreign minister Adbullah Abdullah faced off against former finance minister Ashraf Ghani.

NPR Story
6:16 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Large Blue Diamond Unearthed In South Africa

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Parallels
6:16 am
Mon June 16, 2014

A Chinese Chemical Company And A 'Bath Salts' Epidemic

An empty lab used by China Enriching Chemistry, which was accused of shipping illegal drugs to the U.S. Eric Chang, the company's director, is currently in jail in China, where he was charged with producing ecstasy.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 10:16 am

There were times a few years back when the emergency room at SUNY Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse looked like a scene from a zombie movie. Dr. Ross Sullivan, a physician there, recalls one afternoon when staff wheeled in a man with dilated pupils who was covered in sweat.

"The patient was screaming obscenities, and anybody he would pass, he was threatening and saying he was going to kill them," Sullivan recalls.

Police suspected the patient had taken "bath salts," the notorious synthetic stimulants that were ravaging scores of American communities at the time.

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NPR Story
5:10 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Could Political Patronage In Chicago Be A Thing Of The Past?

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 9:47 am

A federal judge in Chicago will decide on Monday whether to end the federal monitoring of hiring, firing and promotions in city government to ensure politics is not a part of the process.

NPR Story
5:10 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Legendary Radio Host Casey Kasem Dies At 82

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:56 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

We'd like to take a moment now to remember legendary radio host Casey Kasem who died yesterday. He was the voice behind the hugely popular music countdown program, the long-running American Top 40, which he launched in 1970.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO SHOW, "AMERICAN TOP 40")

CASEY KASEM: There it is - the number one song in the USA on American Top 40 for the fourth week running - "Hey Ya!" by OutKast.

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NPR Story
5:10 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Maliki Government Blamed For Militants Advance In Iraq

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:56 am

Linda Wertheimer talks to Reuters Baghdad Bureau Chief Ned Parker about Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's time in office, and how his policies have contributed to deteriorating security conditions.

Around the Nation
7:02 am
Fri June 13, 2014

FBI To Auction Off Confiscated Cyber Currency

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:29 am

Authorities seized $17 million worth of bitcoins from the illegal online drug market Silk Road. This virtual liquidation could cause the value of bitcoins to fall but the FBI says everything must go.

Iraq
6:58 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Iraq's Army Stumbles Because U.S. Left Too Quickly, Analyst Says

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:29 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Latin America
6:25 am
Fri June 13, 2014

World Cup's First Day Marred By Protests

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 9:28 am

Riot police in Sao Paulo used tear gas and stun grenades against protesters angry over Brazil's attention to the World Cup over the needs of its people. The violence came before the first game began.

Around the Nation
6:19 am
Fri June 13, 2014

George H.W. Bush, 90, Jumps Out Of A Helicopter

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:29 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. We noted yesterday that it was George H.W. Bush's 90th birthday. And if you're thinking the president celebrated with an early bird dinner at the local diner, try parachuting out of a helicopter from 6,000 feet. The former president marked his 75th, 80th and 85th birthday with skydives. This time the Boston Globe reports, Bush landed with an unpresidential face-plant on a lawn. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Middle East
6:08 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Iraq's Army Is Ineffective Against Islamist Insurgents

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 9:30 am

There are reports of Iraqi government troops just fleeing, dropping their weapons and shedding their uniforms. The U.S. spent a lot of time and money training Iraqi forces.

Business
5:17 am
Fri June 13, 2014

At E3, Critics Renew Calls For More Diverse Video Game Characters

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 9:29 am

Even though women make up a significant proportion of dedicated gamers, there are few female protagonists in big-selling video games. The same goes for ethnic and racial minorities.

History
5:15 am
Fri June 13, 2014

40 Years On, Woodward And Bernstein Recall Reporting On Watergate

Journalists Bob Woodward (left) and Carl Bernstein at the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C. Their reporting about the scandal later known as "Watergate" won a Pulitzer Prize.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:59 am

Many people know All the President's Men as a film: a hit movie about the two young reporters who cracked the Watergate conspiracy. It's the only blockbuster that centers on two guys making phone calls, organizing paper notes and meeting a source called Deep Throat in a parking garage.

But before the movie, there was a book, which came out 40 years ago this month. In it, reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein tell the story of how they uncovered the scandal.

It all started in the Watergate hotel and office complex in Washington.

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Music
5:02 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Just In Time For Father's Day: Bad Dads In Opera

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 8:19 am

Renee Montagne talks to music commentator Miles Hoffman, who says his candidate for opera's most evil father is the character of Alberich from Richard Wagner's The Ring of the Nibelung.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Sioux Reservation Has Mixed Feelings About Obama Visit

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:29 am

President Obama will go the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation which straddles the border between North and South Dakota. It's his first visit to an Indian reservation since becoming president.

Politics
5:02 am
Fri June 13, 2014

The Challenges Behind Accurate Opinion Polls

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 9:27 am

This week's stunning defeat of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor came after his internal polls showed him winning — instead he lost by double digits.

Sports
7:00 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Uruguay Soccer Legend Left Off World Cup Guest List

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 7:41 am

Alcides Ghiggia is normally invited to the opening match of the World Cup but he wasn't this year. He scored the winning goal against Brazil in 1950, the last time Brazil hosted the tournament.

Around the Nation
6:19 am
Thu June 12, 2014

University Of Virginia Professor To Be Poet Laureate

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 7:41 am

The Library of Congress is expected to announce on Thursday that Charles Wright, 78, of the University of Virginia will be the nation's next poet laureate.

Sports
5:58 am
Thu June 12, 2014

One Day, World Cup May Be Out Of This World

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 7:41 am

Transcript

Iraq
5:22 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Islamist Militants Gain Ground In Northern Iraq

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 7:41 am

Sunni Islamist militants have seized control of the Iraqi cities of Mosul and Tikrit and appear to be preparing an assault on Baghdad. Americans fought and died trying to prevent that from happening.

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