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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA, and WKAR's Melissa Benmark in East Lansing, MI.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

It's happy hour in Illinois. Well, not right this instant, but many are happy that happy hour is back.

Alcoholic drink specials were banned in the state more than 25 years ago, but Gov. Bruce Rauner overturned that yesterday.

There are still some restrictions: So-called volume specials — like two-for-one, or all-you-can-drink — are not allowed.

Happy hour also has to end by 10 p.m. That's fine with your hard-working, overnight-hours Morning Edition staff, so long as happy hour can start at noon.

Researchers in Switzerland say they've solved a nearly 100-year-old astronomical mystery by discovering what's in the wispy cloud of gas that floats in the space between the stars.

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And for more now on the Iran nuclear deal, we're joined by Karim Sadjadpour, who's senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment.

Welcome.

KARIM SADJADPOUR: Great to be with you.

Maj po.

That was "good morning" in Klingon, the fictional language from "Star Trek."

You'd have to be able to speak the language in order to understand a recent statement from a government spokesperson in Wales.

When Darren Miller, an opposition politician, asked about possible UFO sightings at an airport, the spokesperson responded — in Klingon — that her boss would reply in due course.

Millar told the BBC this confirmed his suspicion — that members of government were from another planet.

It's mid-July, and winter has finally ended in Boston — at least symbolically. On Tuesday, Boston's mayor announced that the giant pile of dirty snow left over from the city's record-breaking snowfall had finally melted.

The seven-story snow tower took so long to thaw out that there was a citywide contest to guess when it would go away. In response to the news, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker tweeted: "Our nightmare is finally over!"

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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