Current State

Saturdays at 11am and Sundays at 4pm on 90.5 FM
  • Hosted by

Mid-Michigan's news destination for the informed, the caring and the curious. News and issues, arts and attitudes, and the personalities that make the heart of Michigan beat.

three police officers
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

Law enforcement officers in mid-Michigan are expanding their efforts to help care for victims of opioid addiction.


New Lansing City Hall sign
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Lansing city hall was named in honor of former mayor David Hollister today.


workers with equipment
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

The 2017 Great Lakes Folk Festival gets underway at 6 pm Friday.  Stage crews are checking their wires and vendors their wares before it all begins.  WKAR’s Kevin Lavery strolled around downtown East Lansing to check it out.

 

 

Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

The Jackson County Animal Shelter is back in business after closing earlier this week because of a contagious canine illness.

 


congressman and water bottles
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

Rep. Dan Kildee (D-MI) was back home in Flint Thursday to see how the city is continuing to recover from its ongoing water crisis.

 


 

Brian T. Jackson photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

The fourth ward city council seat in Lansing will have a new face next year. Incumbent Jessica Yorko decided not to run for re-election. Yorko has endorsed Brian T. Jackson’s campaign for the post.


Brooke Allen / WKAR-MSU

WKAR's Brooke Allen talks with Delhi Township Supervisor and Holt Public Schools Superintendent Dr. David Hornak about issues in their community.

Julee Rodocker photo
Skyler Ashley / WKAR-MSU

A former Lansing Board of Water and Light commissioner who still works in the utility industry hopes to become Lansing’s next city council member representing Ward 2. WKAR’s conversations with candidates continue with Julee Rodocker, who expresses pride in her lifetime ties to the second ward.


wide view of East Lansing
WKAR File Photo

All this week, WKAR has reported on the 50th anniversary of the 1967 uprising in Detroit.  The disturbance brought many civil rights issues to the forefront...beliefs and values that extended far beyond Detroit.


Rosalinda Hernandez photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Rosalinda Hernandez, a pastor at I Am Ministries in Lansing, is running for one of two at-large seats on the Lansing city council this year. Along with her ministry, Hernandez is a chaplain with the Lansing Police Department.


REO Town development announcement photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Lansing officials have announced that a couple of businesses will redevelop two buildings in REO Town, further transforming that part of the city as a destination.


Detroit street
Detroit Public Television / DPTV

Fifty years ago today, Detroit was in devastation.

 

The police raid of an after-hours bar on July 23, 1967 triggered a massive wave of arson, looting and sniper fire across much of the city.

 

The Detroit Police Department, the Michigan State Police, the Michigan National Guard and even U.S. Army troops were deployed to bring order to Detroit.  Their presence, however, only seemed to escalate the anger.

Bob Wall photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Detroit wasn’t the only city in Michigan that experienced racial tension and violence during the turbulent summer of 1967. Disturbances ranging from shootings to broken windows were also reported in Grand Rapids, Saginaw, Mount Clemens, Benton Harbor and Pontiac.

In the Calhoun County city of Albion, the racially diverse population led some to call the town “Little Detroit.”

WKAR’s Scott Pohl went to Albion to talk with people who were there, and remain there today.


Willie Horton photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

On July 23rd, 1967, tensions in Detroit boiled over into what came to be known as the Detroit riots. By the time the unrest ended several days later, 43 people were dead, more than a thousand were injured, and two-thousand buildings were destroyed.

The Detroit Tigers were hosting the New York Yankees on that first day, and one young African-American Tigers star who had grown up in Detroit tried to bring calm to the chaos at the intersection of 12th and Clairmount, the epicenter of the riot, while still in uniform.

Willie Horton tells his story of July 23rd, 1967.


Pages