All Things Considered on AM 870 NewsTalk

Weekdays, 4pm - 8pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Science
8:00 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

New Bugs In Florida Stymie Researchers, Threaten Crops

The psyllid, discovered eight years ago in Florida citrus groves, has been problematic for researchers and farmers alike.
University of California, Davis AP

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

With its pleasant climate, Florida has become home to more exotic and invasive species of plants and animals than any other state in the continental U.S. Some invasive species have been brought in deliberately, such as the Burmese python or the Cuban brown snail. But the majority of species are imported inadvertently as cargo.

Amanda Hodges, who heads the biosecurity research lab at the University of Florida, says that until recently, scientists saw about a dozen new bugs arrive in Florida each year.

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NPR Story
4:23 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Conservative Religious Leaders Condemn Same-Sex Marriage Rulings

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

Transcript

JOHN BURNETT, BYLINE: This is John Burnett.

America's religious communities reacted swiftly and strongly to the landmark Supreme Court decisions. There aren't a lot of clergy on the fence. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops called today a tragic day for marriage and our nation. The Mormon Church said in a statement it remains committed to strengthening traditional marriage between a man and a woman, which for thousands of years has proven to be the best environment for nurturing children.

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Books
4:23 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

In 'Sisterland' Familial Fissures And A Pair Of Psychic Twins

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

Curtis Sittenfeld is the Ed Norton of the literary world. Popular but intellectual, accessible but mysterious and, above all — a perspective chameleon with an uncanny ability to enter the minds of callow prep school outcasts and devotedly compromising first ladies alike. With Sisterland, she takes this mind-entering business to a literal level. The story of a pair of adult psychic twin sisters in St. Louis, it would have been an obvious choice for Sittenfeld to tell her story in the form of dueling narration.

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NPR Story
4:23 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Patriots Tight End Aaron Hernandez Charged With Murder

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Aaron Hernandez, now a former tight end for the New England Patriots, was charged with murder today. Hernandez was arrested early this morning in connection with the death of an acquaintance. Soon after, he was cut by the Patriots. And this afternoon, Hernandez was in court, arraigned on murder charges and five gun charges. He pleaded not guilty. NPR's Mike Pesca is following the story. Hi, Mike.

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Environment
7:06 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Obama's Climate Strategy Doesn't Require Congressional Approval

President Obama unveils his plan on climate change Tuesday at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. The president laid out his plan to reduce carbon pollution and to prepare the country for the impacts of climate change.
Alex Wong Getty Images

President Obama unveiled a sweeping plan Tuesday designed to deal with climate change. For the first time, carbon emissions from power plants would be regulated. The policy, which can be implemented by the administration without congressional approval, calls for a broad range of actions, including steps to deal with extreme weather events that are already occurring.

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Music Reviews
6:07 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

For Mavis Staples, 'One True Vine' Brings Together Kindred Spirits

Mavis Staples has been performing for more than six decades. One True Vine is her second album-length collaboration with Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy.
Zoran Orlic Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:24 pm

On their second collaboration, One True Vine, Mavis Staples and Jeff Tweedy assemble a story using songs written by various artists, dotted by frequent lyrical references to The Staple Singers. The album follows a narrative arc of struggle, acceptance and salvation that's mirrored in the crescendo and decrescendo of the music, starting out low and slow.

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Law
6:05 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

NAACP Head: Voting Rights Act Ruling 'Takes Us Way Backwards'

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

NAACP President Ben Jealous called today's decision outrageous, and he joins us now from Aspen, Colorado. Thank you for joining us today.

BENJAMIN JEALOUS: Thank you.

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National Security
6:05 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Russia, U.S. At Odds Over Fate Of Edward Snowden

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Movies
6:05 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

A Revealing '60s 'Portrait,' Opening Eyes In Theaters Again

Jason Holliday, born Aaron Payne, is demanding audiences' attention again in a new theatrical release of Shirley Clarke's Portrait of Jason, restored by Milestone Film and the Academy Film Archive.
Milestone Film

He's got a round, affable face and large, black, hipster glasses. He's smartly dressed in a blazer and button-up shirt. He looks straight into the camera, talking, singing, smoking and drinking — just him, for upward of 90 minutes.

"It only hurts when you think of it," he says, his normally jaunty voice wobbling on the edge of a break. "And if you're real, you think of it a long, long time, that's for sure. Those are the dues."

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Middle East
6:05 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Dozens Dead After Clashes With Radical Cleric In Lebanon

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 1:46 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Calm has been restored in southern Lebanon for now. Clashes between the army and followers of a radical Sunni cleric have left dozens dead over the past two days. It's been called the most violent spillover from the conflict in Syria to a neighboring country. And now, a manhunt is under way for that cleric, Ahmed al-Assir.

NPR's Kelly McEvers traveled from Beirut to the scene of the violence today in Sidon, also known as Saida in Arabic.

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Music Interviews
3:45 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

A First Lady No Longer, Carla Bruni Returns To Music

Carla Bruni's new album, her first since her husband, former President Nicolas Sarkozy, left office, is titled Little French Songs.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 8:06 pm

Ella Fitzgerald was known as the First Lady of Song, but Carla Bruni is the singer-songwriter of first ladies.

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Politics
7:09 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Another Republican Hopes For Upset In Mass. Senate Race

Republican Senate candidate Gabriel Gomez (left) shakes hands with Democrat Ed Markey before a June 5 debate in Brighton, Mass.
Yoon S. Byun AP

Both candidates for U.S. Senate in Massachusetts are finishing a frantic day of campaigning ahead of Tuesday's special election to fill the seat vacated by Secretary of State John Kerry.

Veteran Democratic Rep. Ed Markey is running against Republican businessman Gabriel Gomez. But they are struggling to get voters to the polls in a summer election that has yet to capture much attention.

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U.S.
6:10 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Among Conservatives, Concerns Grow Over New School Standards

Tea Party members protest Common Core in Ocala, Fla., in April. The new educational standards, adopted by almost all the states, are the object of a growing conservative backlash.
Bruce Ackerman Ocala Star-Banner /Landov

"Common Core" is one of the biggest phrases in education today. To many educators and policymakers, it's a big, exciting idea that will ensure that America's students have the tools to succeed after graduation.

But a growing number of conservatives see things differently.

For years, states used their own, state-specific standards to lay out what K-12 students should be learning, for everything from punctuation to algebra. But those standards varied wildly, so the Common Core replaces them with one set of national standards for math and English language arts.

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Environment
6:10 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Congress Not Likely To Pass Sweeping Climate Legislation

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And now to an issue that lawmakers are not spending a lot of time debating: climate change. Tomorrow, President Obama will lay out a strategy to address the problem, using executive powers. It's an admission that's sweeping climate legislation stands little chance of passing Congress as NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports.

JENNIFER LUDDEN, BYLINE: Aides say Mr. Obama's plan includes limiting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. The reaction from House Speaker John Boehner was blunt.

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Law
6:10 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

George Zimmerman's Murder Trial Begins In Florida

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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Games & Humor
6:10 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Disney Rolls Characters Together In New Video Game

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 2:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. This month, we have a special focus on media for kids. And you can't talk about media for kids without talking about Disney. They have a huge new video game coming out later this summer, featuring familiar Disney characters, and they aren't being shy about the name. It's called "Disney Infinity."

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Music Reviews
4:28 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Sigur Ros Navigates Unknown Terrain On 'Kveikur'

Sigur Ros' new album is titled Kveikur.
Lilja Birgisdottir Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 6:10 pm

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All Tech Considered
4:09 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

For Modern Jurors, Being On A Case Means Being Offline

More courts are asking jurors to avoid social media services and tools that have become an integral part of modern life, like Twitter, Facebook, email, texting, instant messaging and Internet research.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 6:10 pm

In the Mercer County Courthouse in Trenton, N.J., John Saunders, a jury manager, spends his weekdays shepherding potential jurors. Much of what he tells them regards the paraphernalia of 21st century life: cellphones, tablets and laptops. These are OK to use in the waiting room, he tells them. "We realize life does not stop."

But in the courtroom, it's all phones off. Laptops and iPads stay with Saunders, and jurors are given a tag to reclaim their items. "Unlike the airport, when you return, your item will be there, and no baggage charge guaranteed," he says.

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The Record
4:01 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Remembering The Multidimensional Music Of Bobby 'Blue' Bland

Bobby "Blue" Bland performs on stage at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival in New Orleans, in 1989.
David Redfern Redferns

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 6:10 pm

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Around the Nation
5:02 pm
Sun June 23, 2013

The 'Time Capsule' Of Mob Lingo At The Whitey Bulger Trial

The testimonies of James "Whitey" Bulger and his Winter Hill Gang cohort have been filled with well-preserved mob lingo.
Jane Flavell Collins ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:39 am

This week, we've been immersed in news about mobs both real and fictional, with the death of Sopranos star James Gandolfini and the continuing trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

The Sopranos gave us a primer on mob language like "clipping" a "rat." But Bulger's Winter Hill Gang and his Boston Irish cohort were the real deal. Members of Bulger's old cohort came to the witness stand and used the real-life slang of their gang days.

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Music
5:02 pm
Sun June 23, 2013

DJ Betto Arcos Spins The Latest From Brazil

Graveola celebrates its hometown of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in the song "Babulina's Trip."
Flavia Mafra Courtesy of the artist

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Author Interviews
5:02 pm
Sun June 23, 2013

A Mother Rescues Her Daughter From War-Torn Syria

Louise Monaghan was previously a senior travel consultant. She's currently a full-time mother.
Courtesy St. Martin's Press

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 6:51 pm

Louise Monaghan's journey to Syria to rescue her kidnapped daughter begins years ago at a club in Cyprus. It was there she met a Syrian man named Mostafa, whom she would marry.

"I was smitten from the first second," she tells NPR's Jacki Lyden. "I felt he was what I needed. He made me feel safe."

But Monaghan was not safe. Mostafa was verbally abusive and beat her. They married, and the couple had a daughter named May. When they divorced, Mostafa was given visitation rights, but he wanted more.

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Health
6:53 pm
Sat June 22, 2013

Ohio Family-Planning Services At Mercy Of Budget Bill

Family-planning clinics would be pushed down the list of health services receiving funding from the state if a budget bill moving through the Ohio Legislature is signed into law.
iStockphoto.com

Working its way through the Ohio Legislature is a state budget bill that has major implications for the way family-planning services are provided. The Ohio budget contains language that puts family-planning clinics at the bottom of the list to receive funding.

Family Planning Association of Northeast Ohio operates several independent family-planning clinics. They do not provide abortions and have no affiliation with Planned Parenthood, but the clinics are still at the end of the line under a new tiered system because they give referrals.

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Asia
6:18 pm
Sat June 22, 2013

Philippines Pulverizes Ivory To Discourage Traffickers

A steamroller tries to flatten tusks, without much luck.
Simone Orendain

Poached ivory is destroying wild populations of elephants and rhinos across Africa and Asia. The strong demand for ivory takes an estimated 25,000 elephant lives each year.

Now, the government of the Philippines is sending a message to poachers and smugglers, by destroying five tons of ivory confiscated in the country. On Friday, environmentalists, government officials, and the public gathered in Quezon City to witness the pulverization.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
5:09 pm
Sat June 22, 2013

The Movie Matthew Morrison Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Actor Jeff Cohen in a scene from The Goonies.
WARNER BROS/Kobal Collection

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 6:18 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Shots - Health News
5:14 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Political Fight Jeopardizes Medicaid In Mississippi

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, a Republican, opposes Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 7:11 pm

Medicaid and controversy seem inseparable in many states lately. For the most part, the wrangling is about a new wrinkle in Medicaid — the expansion of the health program for the poor and disabled under Obamacare.

Mississippi, though, is raising the stakes. Democrats and Republicans in the state are in a fight, and the outcome could threaten the very existence of the entire Medicaid program there.

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National Security
7:23 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

U.S. Charges NSA Leaker Snowden With Espionage

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

NPR has learned that the U.S. Department of Justice has prepared the documents to formally charge Edward Snowden with espionage. Snowden is the former contractor who has publicized details of two U.S. surveillance programs through the British newspaper The Guardian. NPR's Carrie Johnson joins us now with the latest, and Carrie, everyone's been waiting for this shoe to drop. What do we know about the government's plans to proceed?

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Around the Nation
7:11 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

At Coney Island, The (Mermaid) Show Must Go On

The Mermaid Parade at Coney Island draws hundreds of thousands of revelers each June. After sustaining significant damage during Superstorm Sandy, the nonprofit that runs the parade was almost unable to host this year's event, scheduled for Saturday.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Not even Superstorm Sandy could keep the mermaids from coming back to Brooklyn.

The Mermaid Parade is a nautically themed and occasionally naughty parade that draws close to a million people to Coney Island, in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, each June. Sandy nearly drowned the organization that hosts the parade, but supporters donated more than $100,000 to get the parade back on its fins this year.

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Around the Nation
7:11 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Ghost Island Looms Large Among Displaced Inupiat Eskimos

King Island is only accessible via helicopter or chartered boat.
Rachel D'Oro AP

Out in Alaska's Bering Sea, about 90 miles from Nome, sits a small, rocky island that used to be home to a couple of hundred Inupiat Eskimos. They lived in houses built on stilts, perched on rocky cliffs.

Then, about 50 years ago, the threat of rock slides, the spread of tuberculosis and the loss of men to World War II forced residents to relocate to the mainland. King Island has been a ghost island ever since.

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Media
4:27 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Is It Ethical? Universities Pay Newspaper For Coverage

Copies of The Orange County Register slide through the presses. The Register is the country's 20th most-read daily, with a circulation of about 285,000.
Grant Slater KPCC

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 7:11 pm

This spring, readers of The Orange County Register in Southern California started seeing much more coverage of local universities. What they probably did not know is that the stories are paid for by the schools. Depending on whom you ask, it is either a smart way to bring in revenue, or a serious breach of journalism ethics.

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