All Things Considered on 90.5 WKAR

Mon - Fri 4pm - 7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Animals
3:00 pm
Thu December 15, 2011

Ornithologist Discusses Causes Of Bird Downings

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

They're just everywhere. That's how a wildlife manager describes the mass casualties of Eared Grebes that crash landed in southern Utah on Monday night. Some 1,500 grebes died, another 3,000 have been rescued. The small water birds were migrating and apparently mistook a Walmart parking lot, highways and football fields covered with snow for bodies of water.

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Best Books Of 2011
8:16 am
Thu December 15, 2011

Fired Up: The Year's Best Science Fiction, Fantasy

Priscilla Nielsen for NPR

2011 was a good year to be a reader of science fiction and fantasy, although lately every year has been a good year: Not only are the books getting more popular — thank you, Game of Thrones — they're getting more interesting, evolving and morphing in weird, fascinating ways.

They're also interbreeding with other genres to produce wild new hybrid forms, like historical science fiction romances and hard-boiled fantasy detective novels. They're commenting on current events and swapping DNA with literary novels.

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Music
6:44 pm
Wed December 14, 2011

Listeners Pick Their Favorite Albums Of 2011

Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Originally published on Tue December 27, 2011 9:14 am

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Politics
5:08 pm
Wed December 14, 2011

Report: Wealthy 'Elite Donors' Fueling U.S. Politics

A report released by the Sunlight Foundation finds that in the 2010 midterm elections, 26,783 donors nationwide gave more than $10,000 each.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 9:10 pm

A tiny percentage of very wealthy Americans funded a relatively large chunk of the 2010 congressional midterm races, continuing a trend that has been growing for two decades, according to a new analysis of political contributions.

The Sunlight Foundation, which advocates for transparency in politics and government, found that fewer than 27,000 individuals (out of a population of 307 million) each gave at least $10,000 to federal political campaigns in 2010.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Wed December 14, 2011

Norwegian Bakery Gets By During Butter Shortage

Norwegians are suffering a butter shortage. The Nordic country has to go without, supposedly because of trade barriers imposed by the country's dairy cooperative Tine. And of course, this comes right as the holiday baking season is heating up. Lynn Neary talks with Lovisa Morling, of the Apent Bakeri in Oslo, about how the bakery is getting by.

Presidential Race
6:48 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

As Caucuses Loom, Iowans Bemoan Lack of Face Time

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum speaks Tuesday at the Lincoln Cafe in Belle Plaine, Iowa. Among GOP candidates, Santorum had the state to himself on Tuesday.
Chris Carlson Associated Press

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 11:38 pm

The Iowa caucuses — the first contest of the 2012 presidential nominating season — take place in three weeks. That means there's precious little time for candidates to make their case and close the deal with Hawkeye State Republicans.

But candidates were tough to find in Iowa on Tuesday. Only former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum — a big underdog in the race — was there. In fact, many Iowans note that this year candidates have spent fewer hours in the state than before recent presidential caucuses.

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Living Large: Obesity In America
6:46 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

For Teens, Weight Loss Sculpts New Lives

Located in the North Carolina mountains, Wellspring Academy is a boarding school for overweight teenagers. In addition to their regular classes, students learn to control their weight through a healthful diet, physical activity and counseling.
Travis Dove For NPR

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 6:42 pm

Second of two stories, which are part of an ongoing series on obesity in America. The first part begins in August as students start their weight-loss journey at Wellspring Academy, a boarding school in Brevard, N.C. The second checks in with students in late October.

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NPR Story
6:09 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Why GOP Hopefuls Aren't Spending Time In Iowa

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 6:09 pm

With three weeks to go until the Iowa caucuses kick off the Republican nominating contest, the candidates are not registering much of a presence in Iowa.

Three Books...
5:45 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Fakin' It: Three Books On Masquerading Identities

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 7:21 pm

Scratch just a little below the surface of American writing, and you'll find a substratum of stories that revolve around an impostor, a figure at once sinister and fascinating. This charlatan moves fluidly between personae, and in doing so, proves that identity is — especially in America — up for grabs. The impostor thus is everything we insist we are not. But he's also, I think, everything we wish we could be as the inheritors of our open, yet easily manipulated, American culture.

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Music
4:22 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Schubert's 'Winterreise' Paints Bleak Landscape For Bill T. Jones

Choreographer Bill T. Jones at an appearance earlier this year.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 7:55 pm

As snowstorms hit the country today, All Things Considered revisits a vivid story that choreographer and dancer Bill T. Jones shared about one winter song. It originally aired Dec. 13, 2011.

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NPR Story
5:30 pm
Mon December 12, 2011

Gingrich, Huntsman Hold Debate

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 6:33 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

One last note from the campaign trail. Two of Mitt Romney's opponents engaged today in a long conversation, a so-called Lincoln-Douglas style debate at St. Anselm College in New Hampshire.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman, discussed in a gentlemanly manner topics of foreign policy and national security. And Gingrich began with a short critique.

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Opinion
5:17 pm
Mon December 12, 2011

For Nervous Seniors, Some Pre-Graduation Advice

istockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 6:33 pm

Mitchell Zuckoff is a professor at Boston University and the author of Lost in Shangri-La.

I taught my last class of the semester the other day. Inevitably, my students — all of them journalism majors and most of them seniors — hijacked the lesson plan to vent their hopes and fears about what awaits them after graduation.

This happens every December, and each year I do my best to calm and encourage them, to let them know it's OK to be worried but it's not OK to despair. I give them what I've come to consider my pre-commencement address.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Mon December 12, 2011

Ariz. Reacts To Upcoming Immigration Law Review

People in Arizona react after the Supreme Court announced it will rule on parts of the state's controversial law targeting illegal immigrants.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Mon December 12, 2011

Perito: PRTs In Iraq Improved Over Time

Melissa Block speaks with Robert Perito, the director of the Security Sector Governance Center at the U.S. Institute of Peace, about the effectiveness of Provincial Reconstruction Teams, or PRTs, in Iraq over the years. Perito says the teams had a lot of problems from the beginning, but they got better with time.

NPR Story
5:36 pm
Sun December 11, 2011

Baylor's Griffin Wins Heisman

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 10:57 am

Transcript

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: And now, the moment we've been waiting for. It is my pleasure to announce that the 2011 winner of the Heisman Trophy is Robert Griffin III, RG3.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:36 pm
Sun December 11, 2011

Remembering Jerry Robinson, Creator Of The Joker

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 10:57 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: I do believe it's that arch-criminal the Joker.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Flags are flying at half-staff in Gotham City right now. Jerry Robinson, widely considered to be the creator of Batman's iconic enemy the Joker died this past week.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "BATMAN BEYOND")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: (as the Joker) That's not funny.

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Author Interviews
2:57 pm
Sun December 11, 2011

Shimon Peres' Book Honors Israel's Founding Father

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 12:07 pm

Shimon Peres, the Nobel Peace laureate and President of Israel, was just 23 years old when he became a trusted aid to his country's founding prime minister, David Ben-Gurion.

He's not sure why Ben-Gurion put so much faith in someone so young. "Maybe he was wrong, maybe it was a mistake," Peres tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:40 pm
Sun December 11, 2011

Clouds, Concertos And A Trip To Fiji: New Classical Albums

Cloud and Light, by Tshio Hosokawa, was written for the ancient Japanes instrument called the sho.
ECM

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 3:07 pm

With all the chatter about the death of the compact disc, anxiety in the recording industry and the domination of downloads, the flood of CDs overflowing my mailbox never seems to recede. Need a new Bruckner 4th, an Adès anthology or piano music by Pärt? How about Azerbaijani concertos, Schubert sonatas or a new Midsummer Night's Dream?

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Economy
7:00 pm
Sat December 10, 2011

Just What Do The Rich Have That's Taxable?

Venture capitalist Nick Hanauer says he and other wealthy Americans should pay their fair share in order to give the middle class tax relief. Hanauer is also the author of The Gardens Of Democracy.
Second Avenue Partners

In a lot of ways, Nick Hanauer is just like many Americans. He lives in Seattle with his wife and two children, and he grew up working in the family business, manufacturing pillows and comforters.

But recently, Hanauer wrote an opinion piece for Bloomberg News that was a plea to the government: "Please tax me more."

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Music Interviews
4:50 pm
Sat December 10, 2011

Christian McBride: Tackling Two Sides Of Jazz At Once

Jazz bassist Christian McBride has just released two albums — a set of intimate duets called Conversations with Christian and a big-band affair called The Good Feeling.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 1:20 pm

In jazz, to be a bassist usually means playing in someone else's band. The bassist-as-bandleader is a fairly rare thing, with the torch being passed over the years from Charles Mingus to Ron Carter ... and now to Philadelphia-born Christian McBride.

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Economy
3:00 pm
Sat December 10, 2011

Moving On Up More Difficult In America

A new study shows that it is more difficult to "move up" in America than other developed countries. In America, kids are more likely to stay at the bottom of the economic ladder if their parents had low socio- economic status. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz talks with Erin Currier, manager of the Economic Mobility Project of the Pew Charitable Trusts, about why the U.S. ranked worst for economic mobility among the countries in the study.

Politics
3:00 pm
Sat December 10, 2011

GOP Hopefuls Ready For Debate In Iowa

Originally published on Sat December 10, 2011 7:17 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Turning now to domestic politics. The Iowa caucuses are just about three weeks away now. Herman Cain is gone. Newt Gingrich is the new front-runner. And Mitt Romney is slipping somewhat in the polls. Meanwhile, the attacks among the GOP contenders are getting sharper. And against that backdrop, there's another debate tonight. This one at Drake University in Des Moines.

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Analysis
3:00 pm
Sat December 10, 2011

Week In News: Plan To Save Eurozone Takes A Hit

Originally published on Sat December 10, 2011 7:17 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

PRIME MINISTER DAVID CAMERON: Britain is out of it and will remain out of it. Other countries are in it and are having to make radical changes, including giving up sovereignty to try and make it work.

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Asia
3:00 pm
Sat December 10, 2011

Russians Protest Amid Alleged Election Fraud

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 6:50 am

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

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Europe
3:00 pm
Sat December 10, 2011

Nobel Peace Prize Accepted By 3 Women

Originally published on Sat December 10, 2011 7:17 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

For the first time in history, an Arab woman has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. At a ceremony in Oslo, Norway today, Tawakkul Karman, known as the mother of Yemen's democratic revolution, shared the 2011 prize with two Liberian women: President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Leymah Gbowee, who helped lead the protests that ousted former Liberian President Charles Taylor.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

U.S. Faces Financial Troubles As Egypt Needs Aid

The U.S. has poured $28 billion of economic assistance into Egypt in recent decades. But now when Egypt's needs are the greatest, the U.S. and Europe are cash strapped. The Obama administration is trying to quickly reprogram aid to make sure it helps bolster democratic forces in the country and creates jobs to help ease the country's transition. The International Monetary Fund's chief Christine Lagarde says her door is open as well, but countries like Egypt need to ask for aid, which does come with some conditions. Meanwhile, leading members of Congress say the U.S.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

Baseball Faces Busy Off-Season

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 6:12 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Time for some hot stove baseball now. Yes. Even in chilly December, there's still reason to talk about the nation's pastime. For instance, one of baseball's biggest stars is changing uniforms.

Albert Pujols is leaving the World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals. He's been with the Cards for 11 seasons and two World Series rings, but money talks and Pujols is on his way to L.A. and the other league. He'll be playing for the Angels.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

Ron Paul Surges In Iowa Polls

Ron Paul is surging in the polls — at least in Iowa — reflecting the implosion of other candidates, his memorable debate performances and eclectic libertarian positions. He's for ending the wars — as well as what he calls the "socialist big government." What is his role in the GOP nomination race? Who is he hurting and helping? Could he conceivably win the nomination? Does he want to be president?

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

E.U. Moves Ahead With Economic Reforms Package

Originally published on Fri December 9, 2011 6:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

And I'm Lynn Neary. European officials are moving ahead today with a new package of economic reforms. That's after a long night of talks in Brussels. The effort to address the unyielding debt crisis has threatened European unity and one important country, the United Kingdom, has refused to sign off on the reforms. More on that in a moment, but first we hear about the new rules from NPR's Jim Zarroli.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri December 9, 2011

Romney Returns To Iowa

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Mitt Romney was also in Iowa today. His campaign has spent the past several days on the offensive against Newt Gingrich. As Iowa Public Radio's Kate Wells reports, the former Massachusetts governor is facing a bigger challenge than he planned.

KATE WELLS, BYLINE: Remember when Mitt Romney wasn't supposed to really need Iowa?

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

MITT ROMNEY: Thank you, Tom. Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

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