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Morgan McCaul speaks to MSU Trustees photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

With calls for interim MSU President John Engler to resign or be removed by the Board of Trustees growing, the board is scheduled to hold its regular public meeting on Friday.


Ziv Levi and Jeff Rehm photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR/MSU

Can a hacker seize control of your car? What’s the worst that could happen? The answers are yes, that could happen someday, and the result could be plenty bad.

A Michigan company is working on ways to improve the cyber security of cars.


Tereza Lee is a music teacher and a concert pianist who is pursuing a Ph.D. at the Manhattan School of Music.

But Lee, who was born in Brazil to parents who fled South Korea in the wake of the Korean War, is also known for something else: She's the original inspiration behind the DREAM Act, the legislative effort to provide legal status to undocumented young people.

This essay isn't about spin, or splitting hairs, or differing opinions.

This involves a reality check about our expectations of the people who act in our name. About credibility at the highest levels of our government. About people whose words are heard abroad as speaking for our nation. About the public and the media that try, however imperfectly, to serve it.

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Two thousand, three hundred - that is the number of children estimated to have been separated from their parents at the border since the Trump administration instituted its zero-tolerance policy.

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Third grade teacher Tony Osumi says he, like a lot of Americans, watched the recent news from the Southern US border with growing dismay. The images and sounds of wailing children being pulled from their tearful parents' arms and taken away to temporary shelters made him wince—and reminded him of the first day of school for children who hadn't been before.

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They're used to rushing, tackling, and taking hits in front of 65,000 screaming spectators. But it was a whole different ball game when three New England Patriots came to a much smaller stage at a middle school in Boston's inner city this week to challenge five candidates vying to be district attorney on how they'd make the criminal justice system more fair.

"[My] nervous level is pretty high right now," conceded player Matthew Slater, as the auditorium began to fill up. Each clutching a wad of notes, his teammates Jason and Devin McCourty, seemed to feel the same way.

Elkins, O'Rielly and David photo
Amanda Pinckney / WKAR/MSU

The Federal Communications Commission has granted Michigan State University and WKAR Public Media a special license to launch an experimental Next Generation TV broadcasting station.

It’s called ATSC 3.0.

The order came in April. China's government instructed farmers in the country's northeastern breadbasket region to grow more soybeans, calling it "a political priority."

But soybean fields lay empty in the village of Sandaogou, which means "Three Ditches," in Liaoning province. It has been a dry spring.

"We've had a drought this year, so we planted soybeans late. The seedlings should be out by now. We need more rain," says farmer Liu, who only gives her surname for fear of trouble with local authorities. Soy, after all, has become "political."

A recording of migrant children crying for their mothers and fathers has gripped the nation — and ratcheted up the debate over the Trump administration's policy of separating families at the border.

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The Trump administration is reversing another decision made by the Obama administration and pulling out of the U.N.'s Human Rights Council. The U.S. ambassador to the U.N., Nikki Haley, says the body is not worthy of its name.

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