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10:25 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Eat, Fast & Live Longer with Dr. Michael Mosley

Wednesday, April 3, 10 p.m. | WKAR

Michael Mosley
Michael Mosley

A  series of health-focused specials comes to WKAR's smart and popular “Exploration Wednesdays” science programming block on Wednesday evenings this week.

The specials follow best-selling British author, journalist and popular TV personality Dr. Michael Mosley as he conducts experiments on himself to improve his health and discovers how the human body works. The first is Eat, Fast & Live Longer.

Self-Experimentation as a Research Device

“I have always been interested in self-experimentation as a research device because so many of the most important discoveries came from scientists and doctors who used themselves as test subjects,” Mosley says, “but I had never before performed a series of trials on my own health.” 

He says that when routine blood work last year revealed troubling signs — including borderline diabetes and high cholesterol — his doctor recommended medications.  “But I chose instead to seek out doctors and scientists doing cutting-edge research into these problems, which so many others face as well, and use these specials to demonstrate the journey I took to find those solutions.”

Eat, Fast, Live Longer

In the first program, Mosley sets an ambitious goal: to become healthier and lose weight while making as few changes as possible to his life.

In working toward these goals, Mosley discovers a powerful new science behind the old idea of fasting, a program that still allows him to enjoy his favorite foods.  He takes a road trip across the U.S. to investigate how a little hunger can turn on the body’s “repair genes” and, of course, tries the new science himself.

Mosley learns that a diet based on feast and famine has powerful effects on the body, reducing the risks of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers. The diet seems to pack the anti-aging clout of calorie restriction while still allowing for a taste of the good life. And it turns out to be not only good for the body; it may also be good for the brain.