Mark Bashore

Host, Current State

Mark Bashore is host of Current State, WKAR's daily news show focusing on community issues, arts and culture, music and more.

Mark is well-known to WKAR listeners as mid-Michigan host of All Things Considered for several years prior to hosting Current State.  

Mark Bashore joined WKAR in May 2007. Prior to his arrival at WKAR, he hosted a talk show on WJIM AM in 2005 and previous to that was morning show host and producer at WFMK in Lansing for 14 years.

Ways To Connect

State capitol
Jake Neher / MPRN

Every month we look back at the state's top news stories. For June, the topics include important U.S. Supreme Court rulings and the ongoing issue of how to pay for road repairs.


WKAR File Photo

Lee Chaney and Dawn Chapel of Mason became the first couple in Ingham county to be married following Friday’s same sex marriage ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.


Same sex marriage photo
Mark Bashore / WKAR

Current State talks with Ingham County Clerk Barb Byrum, who began performing same sex marriage ceremonies shortly after today's U.S. Supreme Court decision was announced.


Current State talks with analyst Marianne Udow-Phillips about the U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding the Affordable Care Act.


Mary Pline car photo
WLNS/Ionia County Sheriff's Office

Mary Pline was rescued from a submerged car in the aftermath of this week's tornado in Portland.


Naeyaert and Daman with Bashore
Scott Pohl / WKAR

Continued funding for the Ingham Health Plan debated as U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare looms. Current State speaks with Tim Daman of the Greater Lansing Regional Chamber of Commerce and County Commissioner Robin Naeyaert.

A group of Lansing activists want to enact a city anti-corruption ordinance. Current State talks to political activist Walt Sorg about what triggered this effort.

Picture of David Hollister and Virg Bernero
Mark Bashore / WKAR

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero says it’s time to explore the possibility of selling the city-owned Board of Water and Light. Bernero has called on the city’s Financial Health Team to begin studying such a move. Current State talks to ex-Mayor David Hollister, who chairs the team, about the issue.


Emily Stillman photo
http://www.foreveremily.org/

Federal health authorities appear to be getting close to approving a vaccine against potentially fatal Meningitis B. In 2013, the disorder made national news after outbreaks at two U.S. universities with around ten confirmed cases. None were fatal.

markschauer.com

In last November’s elections for the Michigan House of Representatives,  49-percent of voters chose a Republican to represent them. Nonetheless, a headcount reveals that House Republicans comfortably outnumber Democrats, 63-47. The reason is the way legislative districts are drawn.

    

After years of single-minded dedication that began very early in her life, Jordyn Wieber’s stellar gymnastics career reached pinnacles in 2011 and 2012. Those were the years she won a world championship in "all around" competition and a gold medal in the London Olympics. Earlier this year, the Dewitt native announced her retirement from elite competition.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

Since the launch of Obamacare, close to 300,000 Michigan residents have enrolled in health insurance plans offered through the state exchange.  

Many of them are now watching the U.S. Supreme Court closely.   A decision in the the case ‘King v Burwell’ is due by the end of the month.  It will determine whether or not federal subsidies, which help pay premiums for about three-quarters of those participants, will continue.

State capitol
Jake Neher / MPRN

Legislation granting Michigan faith-based adoption agencies the right not to serve same-sex and unmarried couples may be going to Gov. Rick Snyder soon. Yesterday, the Michigan Senate followed the lead of the House and passed such a measure. First, it will return to a House conference committee to resolve one part of the measure.

http://msutoday.msu.edu/

Even the most casual cable TV viewers have, on occasion, been led to ask themselves "How long could I survive in the wild without food? What could I eat?" Peter Carrington will offer those kind of insights tomorrow at Michigan State University’s Beal Botanical Garden. He's the assistant curator of the Beal Garden, where he is the edible and toxic plant specialist. He’s also been an assistant instructor in the MSU plant biology department. His free, 40-minute session is called "Weeds you can eat, and NOT."

More than a half million Michigan public school students have now completed their first M-STEP tests. The Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress replaced the MEAP assessment beginning in April. M-STEP is designed as an online assessment that covers content from the more demanding Common Core curriculum.  It has fewer multiple choice questions and more that require problem solving and critical thinking skills.

www.lansingcitypulse.com

 

Every week, our first guest shares his views in the pages of the Lansing City Pulse, where he serves as Associate Publisher.

Recently, Mickey Hirten has opined on a potential sale of the Lansing Board of Water and Light--a good move in his view--and the future of the Lansing City Market.

Current State checks in with Mickey on those issues and his upcoming column  that will look into a recent initiative by the Catholic Diocese of Lansing to assist the poor in the city of Flint.

http://www.vermontlaw.edu/

It might be the “mother of all hiking trails.”  A devotee of the Great Lakes is proposing a nearly 11-thousand mile path that would circumnavigate all five of the lakes.

Picture of David Hollister and Virg Bernero
Mark Bashore / WKAR

Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero says the time has come to explore the possibility of selling the city-owned Board of Water and Light. According to a statement provided to Lansing City Pulse, Bernero views potential changes involving the BWL as “a way to address our long term liabilities.” However,  he said any decision at this point, “would be premature.”

“It’s every citizen’s right to film the police.” Those are the words of ACLU Michigan Executive Kary Moss. The occasion was this week’s announcement that the civil liberties organization would offer a free smartphone app that enables users to videotape police encounters. The Mobile Justice Michigan app would then automatically send the video to the ACLU for review.

Office of Kevin Cotter

  Road funding, education spending and other budget issues are among the focus of discussions at the state capitol.   There were several developments yesterday in education spending.  A measure meant to bridge the funding gap between school districts emerged.   Meanwhile, a focus in the road funding debate continues to be whether the money for a fix can be found among existing revenue or if new revenue is required.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

Last week on Current State, we heard from the leader of a Michigan petition effort that's aimed at banning hydraulic fracturing in the state. Fracking, as it’s called, pumps a combination of water and chemicals into underground rock where natural gas and oil are trapped. The process crushes the rock surrounding the deposits and frees them. The growth of hydraulic fracturing is credited for making the United States the world’s leading producer of oil and gas.

www.senatormargaretobrien.com/

Last week, we spent some time learning about a unique support group for caregivers based in Albion. Caring for the Caregivers is a monthly gathering that allows caregivers to share their challenges and learn about relevant skills. Today, we take another look at caregiving, this time at proposed legislation aimed at helping Michigan’s estimated two-million caregivers.

State capitol
Jake Neher / MPRN

The end of a stimulating month in Michigan politics and government is about here. The legislature is busy hammering out a new budget, considering a prevailing wage repeal and getting to know some visiting Presidential candidates better.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

An effort to repeal Michigan’s 50-year old prevailing wage law moved forward this week. On Tuesday, the state board of canvassers approved the form of a citizen petition that could put it to a vote in the state legislature. Meanwhile, the Michigan Senate has already passed such a measure and sent it to the House, but a citizen petition, if approved by the legislature, could not be vetoed by Governor Rick Snyder. The Governor opposes repeal.

If you were in Michigan in the 1960’s, your memories probably include the Palm Sunday tornadoes, Governor and Presidential candidate George Romney and the Vietnam War. A Lansing-born journalist with roots in that memorable decade has written a memoir that includes those three and more.

http://www.letsbanfracking.org/

For the third time in recent years, opponents of hydraulic fracturing are organizing to end the practice in Michigan. The Committee to Ban Fracking, based in Charlevoix, has begun a ballot campaign hoping to put a ban before voters in next years general election.

Flickr - janeyessee

It’s Wednesday, which means it’s time for Neighbors in Action, when we feature people and organizations working to make mid-Michigan a better place. It’s estimated that there are more than two-million caregivers in Michigan. Some are health care professionals, but many others provide care for their family members at home. Even with the proper training, caregiving is stressful work, both physically and emotionally.

Jake Neher/MPRN

Democratic Michigan Sen. Gary Peters has gotten behind legislation that would address two very different national issues: criminal justice and student debt. Monday, on a visit to Detroit, the state’s junior senator called for a “top to bottom” review of the U.S. criminal justice system by creating a National Criminal Justice Commission. And last week, Peters introduced the Federal Adjustment in Reporting (FAIR) Student Credit Act. It would help private student loan borrowers rehabilitate defaulted loans.

Wikimedia Commons/Paul R. Kucher

Four months of negotiations between Lansing’s Board of Water and Light and the utility’s former General Manager, Peter Lark, concluded last night.

BWL commissioners agreed unanimously to settle with Mr. Lark for $650,000 after his January dismissal “for cause” by those same commissioners.  A dismissal “for cause” implies employee misconduct.  Current State gets an update from LSJ reporter Steven Reed, who has covered the BWL since the 2013 ice storm that eventually led to yesterday’s agreement.  

Scott Pohl/WKAR

State lawmakers are again looking for ways to pay for road repairs in Michigan, and that means subsidies for the film industry are again being targeted. That has amounted to $50-million a year in recent years. 

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