Mark Bashore

Host, All Thing Considered and Current State

Mark Bashore is WKAR local host for All Things Considered, and managing editor and host of Current State, WKAR's weekly news show focusing on community issues, arts and culture, music and more.

Mark Bashore joined WKAR in May 2007. Prior to his arrival at WKAR, he hosted a talk show on WJIM AM in 2005 and previous to that was morning show host and producer at WFMK in Lansing for 14 years.

groundskeeper cutting fallen tree with chain saw
Mark Bashore / Host/reporter

Around 5,500 customers of the Lansing Board of Water and Light still were without electricity mid-afternoon on Thursday after high winds the day before brought down trees and utility lines across the state.

A BWL online outage map showed power should be completely restored by mid-afternoon Saturday.

Consumers Energy’s website showed about 3,600 Ingham county customers were still waiting for the lights to come on.

A spokesman says Lansing area Consumers' customers should have power restored by late Saturday night. 

Michigan State University outdoor sign
Mark Bashore / Host/reporter

Four more defendants with connections to Michigan State University were named Wednesday in the ongoing federal lawsuit against the school and former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar.

The Lansing State Journal reports they include Dr. William Strampel, dean of the university’s School of Osteopathic Medicine, former women’s gymnastics coach Kathy Klages, sports doctor Jeff Kovan and former MSU psychologist Dr. Gary Stollak. 

The amended complaint---filed by Okemos-based law firm Church-Wyble---also named John Geddert of Dimondale’s ‘Twistars’ gymnastics club. 

medical stethescope
Rohvannyn / Pixabay

A Michigan healthcare policy expert says it will take time to analyze the potential impact on the state of the proposed Republican replacement for Obamacare.

Dennis Paradis is Executive Director of the Michigan Health Policy Forum. 

He says he’s concerned about the impact of its eventual cap on federal funding of Medicaid.

About 630,000 Michigan residents have purchased health insurance because the Affordable Care Act led to Medicaid expansion in the state. 

The Healthy Michigan program is funded almost completely with federal subsidies.

View of Great Lakes from space
Jeff Schmaltz / NASA/GSFC

An organization representing tens of thousands of Michigan anglers and hunters has joined critics of a plan to cut federal funding to restore the Great Lakes.

 

Last week, a leaked spending plan from the Trump administration showed proposed cuts that would reduce federal funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative from $300 million to $10 million.

 

The initiative helps pay to improve water quality and restore wetlands. 

 

Drew Youngedyke is a spokesman for the Michigan United Conservation Clubs.

 

Gary Naeyaert, during a radio interview
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

A well-known Michigan lobbyist has resigned in the wake of recent remarks he made that triggered controversy.

The board of the Great Lakes Education Project--a school choice advocacy group--accepted Gary Naeyaert’s resignation Tuesday.

Last week, Naeyaert told a gathering of the Senate Education committee that he wanted to “shake” Michigan School Reform Officer Natasha Baker “like I like to shake my wife” for admitting her office was unable to hold persistently failing schools accountable.

workers making a GMC Acadia
General Motors

More than a thousand General Motors hourly workers in Delta township will be laid off in May as the automaker ends third shift operations there.

The move--which many expected—was announced on Monday.

It comes after the automaker’s decision to shift production of the next generation GMC Acadia to Spring Hill, Tennessee.

The Delta plant has produced the first generation Acadia since 2006.

It will lower the number of hourly employees at the facility to about 2,100.

Cars on Lansing area highway
WKAR-MSU

A key figure working to bring down Michigan auto insurance rates says she’s looking at ways to tame individual ‘cost drivers’ that increase premiums.

Republican State Representative Lana Theis of Brighton chairs the House Insurance committee.

She’s looking at what she calls a “line item” approach:  identifying medical procedures that cost much more following a car accident than after, say, a bike accident.

Judi Brown-Clarke standing at podium
Mark Bashore / WKAR-MSU

Saying “I am ready to get started,” Lansing city council member Judi Brown-Clarke announced Thursday she is a candidate for mayor. 

The Olympic medal winner said she’s received encouragement to run for the post from “across the city.”

She said she will roll out a detailed plan to move the city forward “very shortly.”

Brown-Clarke says a priority would be to cultivate regionalism.

“There’s absolutely no way we can accomplish what we’re attempting to without regional cooperation and partnership,” she said.

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette
www.billschuette.com

Michigan on Wednesday joined a multi-state antitrust lawsuit against six generic drug companies.

The action by Attorney General Bill Schuette against Heritage Pharmaceuticals and five others alleges the drug makers participated in an illegal scheme to reduce competition and manipulate prices of one antibiotic and an oral diabetes medication.

Andrea Bitely is a spokesperson for the AG.

She says the drugs involved are vital for peoples’ lives.

Mark Dantonio at podium
Samuel Mikalonis / Flickr

Michigan State University head football coach Mark Dantonio broke a nearly 4-week silence today, commenting for the first time on sexual assault allegations against three unidentified football players.

In a statement released by the university, he said they are being taken “very seriously.”

Dantonio declined to comment on ongoing investigations into the alleged January incident other than to “respect the process.”

Gray wolf
zsoravecz / Pixabay

With the rebound of the grey wolf population in Michigan and other states, mid-Michigan Congressman John Moolenaar is urging action by Congress to remove the animal from the endangered species list.

The Midland Republican co-signed a letter with seven other representatives sent last week to House Speaker Paul Ryan recommending the action.

Delisting would give farmers and ranchers the right to take wolves when they threaten livestock.

The letter emphasized quick action to protect calves as spring approaches. 

Front of Lansing city hall
WKAR-MSU

The field of Lansing mayoral candidates should become clearer soon.

City council member Judi Brown-Clarke says she made her decision whether or not to run last weekend and will announce her plans in the next couple of days.

She said her mind was made up before Mayor Virg Bernero on Monday announced his intention not to seek re-election.

Last week, Democratic State Representative Andy Schor announced his candidacy.

Voters will decide the city’s first new mayor in over a decade this November.

Virg Bernero photo
W.R. Richards / WKAR-MSU file photo

Citing the need to “put…family first,” three term Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero is dropping out the 2017 mayor’s race.

In a statement on Facebook, Bernero referred to years of support he’s received from his wife and two daughters as well as responsibilities involving care of his elderly father.

91-year old Giulio Bernero lives with the mayor and his family.

Bernero says he “cannot do justice” to the city and his family during a 7-month campaign.

After office, he referred to beginning “a new chapter.”

Front of Lansing city hall
WKAR-MSU

The Lansing City Council is set to vote Monday evening whether to alter the bidding process for development projects in the city.

The 'transparency in bidding' proposal would force disclosure of details about developers' plans if they’re in line to receive city tax abatements or other financial perks.

Council President Patricia Spitzley says she supports more transparency but opposes the current measure. 

She says the language is too ambiguous.

Journalists interviewing St. Rep Jim Tedder
WKAR-MSU

The chair of the House Tax Policy committee is defending Republican Speaker Tom Leonard’s decision to allow a vote on a failed measure to cut the state income tax.

Leonard’s been criticized for the move after saying he knew the proposal didn’t have the votes to pass.

Representative Jim Tedder says it gave House members a chance to vote their conscience.

“I don’t feel that this was political," he says. "I feel that this was an opportunity for all of us to show our districts where we stood.” 

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