Kevin Lavery

News Reporter and Host

Kevin Lavery is a general assignment news reporter and produces news features and interviews for Current State. He's also an alternate local host on NPR's "Morning Edition."

Prior to coming to WKAR in 2006, Lavery was a reporter at KWMU in St. Louis, Missouri, covering local politics, government, and biotechnology issues.

Lavery's journalism career began in the Navy. He studied journalism at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana; worked as news director and television producer for American Forces Network-Japan; and served in Antarctica as radio program director at the McMurdo Station Research Facility on Ross Island.

Ways to Connect

men with helmets
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

In the worlds of sports, TBI is becoming as familiar an acronym as NFL and NBA. Traumatic brain injury can abruptly end a player’s career.  On the playing field, it can be hard to tell the severity of the impact.  Now, a newly-marketed invention created by two Michigan State University chemists is helping to give those answers immediately.


portrait
courtesy / PBS

President Trump's proposed 2018 budget would eliminate all funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.  CPB helps financially sustain public radio and television stations across the U.S., including WKAR.  PBS president and CEO Paula Kerger is trying to prevent that loss of funding. She speaks to the Detroit Economic Club on Friday.


drone and trees
Courtesy / flickr/Michael MK Khor

The United Nations recognizes March 22 as World Water Day.  Michigan State University is observing the event with a speaker series.  Dr. Bruno Basso, a University Foundation Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, uses drones to study how seed crops consume water. 

 


Flint sign over street
WKAR File Photo / WKAR-MSU

Civic leaders and health officials in Flint are building a database to track and treat victims of lead-contaminated water.  The whistleblower physician who first spotted the problem in Flint children hopes it will be a vital public health tool.


church in Detroit
Courtesy / Flickr/Ken Lund

A small coalition of interfaith churches is making a big statement in Michigan.  The group is declaring itself a “sanctuary network,” and says it will protect individuals and families on the verge of being deported. 

 


boats near Mackinac Bridge
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

A state commission is meeting in Lansing Monday to learn more about the condition of a controversial oil pipeline that runs beneath the Straits of Mackinac. 

The Pipeline Safety Advisory Board wants to hear Enbridge Energy’s plans to address deterioration on parts of Line 5.  An independent report finds nearly 20 sites along the pipeline where an anti-corrosive coating is deteriorating.

cross with tree branches
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

As the Trump administration prepares to enact its updated travel ban, a number of U.S. churches have stated they will offer sanctuary to refugees and immigrants.  No definitive action has taken place in mid-Michigan...but the conversation is growing.  

WKAR’s Kevin Lavery talks with Oscar Castaneda with Action of Greater Lansing what a formal sanctuary policy might look like here.

man trims tree near power line
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

UPDATE: With powerful winds knocking down trees and power lines on Wednesday, Michigan utilities are working to restore service. A month ago, Kevin Lavery reported on tree trimming efforts aimed at reducing the impact of storms.


man near sign
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

In 2016, Michigan landfills took in more than 49 million cubic yards of solid waste. Some of that total included food particles that were thrown out by restaurants and food processing facilities.  

The city of Lansing is trying to reduce that environmental impact with a pilot program known as “Scraps to Soil.”


man with rain gauge
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

Winter is slowly coming to an end in Michigan.  But the arrival of spring means watching out for severe storms.  Last Tuesday, three confirmed tornado touchdowns were reported in southwest Michigan.

When the storms strike, the National Weather Service office in Grand Rapids relies on a network of volunteer weather spotters to keep an eye on the sky. 

woman holding black curtain
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

The Hall of Fame will host its next induction ceremony in a brand new location. In April, the organization will move out of the historic Cooley-Haze House in Lansing and into a space in the Meridian Mall in Okemos.

 


Dr. Mona Hannah-Attisha
Courtesy / Michigan State University

President Trump delivered his first address before Congress Tuesday.  He touched on themes ranging from immigration reform to counter terrorism to education.  One prominent guest in the audience came to hear Mr. Trump’s plans to resolve a crisis in Michigan that’s resounded around the world.

man speaking to reporters
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

The state of Michigan has filed nearly two dozen new charges against Dr. Larry Nassar.  The former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University physician is accused of sexually assaulting a number of young women who came to him as patients seeking medical treatment.  Nassar now stands accused of 25 counts of criminal sexual conduct.


crowd at high school
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

In the 2016 election, Michigan House Republicans edged out Democrats by just 3,000 votes.  Yet, the GOP won more than 57 percent of all state House seats.  Their victory was the result of creative map making.

 

State legislative districts are drawn by whichever political party is in power.  Both Democrats and Republicans tend to draw those boundaries to consolidate their voting base.  The practice is called “gerrymandering,” and opponents say it diminishes the voice of the people.


city skyline at sunset
Courtesy / flickr/Steve Marr

America has had a long history of turbulent race relations.  It took nearly a century of struggle after the Civil War to tear down the Jim Crow laws that isolated blacks from whites.  While institutional racism had been embedded into the law in the segregated South, racial disparities took on more subtle forms in the North.  So-called “sundown towns” existed from coast to coast -- including in Michigan.

 


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