Cheyna Roth

Reporter - Michigan Public Radio Network

Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County.

Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism.

She earned her masters degree at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR.

Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan.

Cheyna also focuses on the Legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN.

Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker.

Gavel
s_falkow / flickr creative commons

Michigan teachers and school employees celebrated a major victory over the state Wednesday.

Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth explains the Michigan Supreme Court announced the state has to give back 550 million dollars to school employees.  

Current State for Dec. 16-17, 2017

Dec 17, 2017

On the December 16-17, 2017 edition of Current State we talk with Rachel Denhollander, the first woman to publicly accuse MSU gymnastics physician Larry Nassar of sexual abuse; hear from a reporting team about why #MeToo may not apply to cases of black women sexually assaulted in Michigan; update you on medical marijuana licensing in Michigan; visit Puerto Rico months after Hurricane Maria; learn about a new way of treating invasive species; and meet a YouTube sensation with ties to MSU. 


Wikimedia Commons

Applications for medical marijuana licenses became available Friday. The process got off to a slower start than some expected. But as Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth reports, the state was ready for anything.


MLive

The state might change its mind about putting a new veterans’ home in Detroit. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth reports the Legislature passed a bill Wednesday that lets the state put the home in a different location.


pills in hand
flickr/frankieleon

Legislation aimed at curbing the state’s opioid crisis is on its way to the governor. 


Michigan lawmakers passed a last minute bill to help areas affected by chemical contamination. $23 million will go toward helping Michigan’s PFAS problem.


MLive

When the Legislature reconvenes next week, two new faces will be added to the state House of Representatives. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth introduces the new representatives.


school classroom
Wokandapix / Pixabay

Michigan’s special education students need more resources. That’s according to a new report released Wednesday. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth has more.


Medical marijuana photo
Dank Depot / flickr creative commons

A state department is taking a little longer to release medical marijuana licensing rules. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth has more.


nypost.com

Michigan is one big step closer to voting on marijuana legalization. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth explains an initiative turned in its signatures to get on the 20-18 ballot Monday.


marijuana plants
mark / flickr/creative commons

The state announced the price tag Friday for applications to grow, sell or transport medical marijuana. The application fee will be 6-thousand dollars. It’s a one-time, non-refundable fee. That’s on top of up to 5-thousand dollars that municipalities can charge for an application.


picture of the Michigan Capitol Building
lehooper / flickr creative commons

A teen was recently attacked in Muskegon County. Officials say it’s because he’s gay. Now prosecutors and lawmakers are calling on the legislature to expand the state’s hate crimes law. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth has more.


Wikimedia Commons

Michigan residents who want to get into the medical marijuana business had their last shot at a training session Wednesday. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth reports the last session was held in Lansing. 


classroom photo
Wikimedia Commons

The State’s Board of Education can’t decide what to do about recent gun legislation. There are four Democrats and four Republicans on the board. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth reports that means the board can’t come to an agreement on a public position on bills that loosen restrictions on guns in schools.


Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Another governor has found his place on the walls of the Michigan State Capitol. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth explains.


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