Cheyna Roth

Reporter - Michigan Public Radio Network

Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County.

Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism.

She earned her masters degree at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR.

Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan.

Cheyna also focuses on the Legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN.

Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker.

Patrick Colbeck Facebook

Tensions were high on the Senate floor Thursday when a lawmaker doubled down on claims that Muslim terrorist groups are trying to infiltrate the US.


booking photo
Michigan Attorney General

A former Michigan State University dean is accused of using practice medical exams for his own sexual pleasure. Capitol correspondent Cheyna Roth reports William Strampel has already been charged with multiple crimes related to sexually assaulting and harassing former MSU students.


Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Four years is too long to go without clean drinking water. That was the message of a busload of Flint residents who marched in downtown Lansing Wednesday. Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports.


man in courtroom
WKAR File Photo

Lawmakers continue to focus on bills aimed at sexual assault prevention in response to Larry Nassar. Nassar is the former doctor who told patients he was treating them, when he was actually sexually assaulting them. 


state capitol building
WKAR File Photo / WKAR-MSU

Public school teachers marched through downtown Lansing Friday.  They delivered a petition against guns in schools to the state Capitol.

On the April 21-22, 2018 edition of Current State: a new bill to make thousands of Medicaid recipients in Michigan work for their benefits, an MSU professor gives his thoughts on the controversy at Starbucks, Kendrick Lamar wins a Pulitzer, a new place to watch glass-blowing in Michigan and meet the "last keeper of the light" in Ireland. Saturday at 11:00 a.m. & Sunday at 4:00 p.m. on 90.5 FM. 


Michigan could soon require certain people to work for their Medicaid benefits. A bill passed a state Senate panel Wednesday.


Flickr - Todd Ehlers

Inmates at a mid-Michigan prison are on lockdown after gang related fighting.  

Larry Nassar photo
Katie Cook / WKAR

Some doctors in Michigan are concerned about unintended consequences to their profession if state lawmakers pass some sexual assault bills they’re considering. Capitol Correspondent Cheyna Roth explains a state House committee heard testimony on a package of bills Tuesday.


An electrical cable that leaked hundreds of gallons of mineral oils into the Straits of Mackinac will be inspected – as soon as the weather clears up.


Capitol building
File Photo / WKAR-MSU

State lawmakers want to hit universities in their pocketbooks if they don’t follow certain sexual assault policies. 


Cheyna Roth / MPRN

People from Flint interrupted a state legislative session Wednesday to demand clean drinking water.


MSU sign
Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

Michigan universities might have to report all campus sexual assaults to their governing boards.


Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

Michigan students aren’t doing well nationally in areas like reading and math. That’s according to results on a nationwide test. Meanwhile, the state is focused on increasing skilled trades training.


chairs and desks
WKAR File Photo

Bills in the state Legislature would require schools to teach what’s called affirmative consent – or “yes means yes” -- as part of sex education. Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth has more.


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