Cheyna Roth

Reporter - Michigan Public Radio Network

Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County.

Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism.

She earned her masters degree at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR.

Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan.

Cheyna also focuses on the Legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN.

Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker.

husband and wife on farm
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

UPDATE filed by Cheyna Roth of the Michigan Public Radio Network:

A mid-Michigan farmer that was denied an application to the 2017 East Lansing farmer's market can go to the market for the rest of the 2017 season. The farmer sued the city when he was denied a spot. The city said the farmer's Facebook posts saying the farm would not host same sex marriages went against a city ordinance. The farmer says, this violates his free speech and free exercise of religion. The farmer asked for an order from the judge saying he could sell produce at the market while the case is underway. The judge granted the request saying the farmer has a "substantial likelihood of success" on at least one of his claims.

Police Lights
publicdomainpictures

The Michigan Court of Appeals has ordered the City of Grand Rapids to turn over to MLive Media Group police recordings about a car crash involving Kent County Assistant Prosecutor, Josh Kuiper.  

Various signs of medical marijuana dispensaries in Lansing.
Reginald Hardwick / WKAR Public Media

Medical marijuana users who buy from dispensaries will need to find a new source by December 15th. Cheyna Roth reports.

Audio Pending...

Wikimedia Commons

The future of medical marijuana dispensaries in Michigan could be decided Tuesday. The state Medical Marijuana Licensing Board meets again to discuss whether current dispensaries should be able to get a license. Cheyna Roth has more.


Michigan Farm Bureau YouTube screenshot

A federal judge could decide on Wednesday whether a Charlotte farmer can go forward with his lawsuit against East Lansing. 

A change to the state’s minimum wage might be on the 20-18 ballot. Cheyna Roth explains restaurant owners are already speaking out against the proposal.  


MLive

The state Legislature was back in session for its first day of voting today and lawmakers were met with protestors at the Capitol.


Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

Governor Rick Snyder plans to announce a new recycling initiative this fall. 


Michigan Capitol
File Photo / WKAR

Members of the state House of Representatives are planning changes to the state’s mental health system. 


Chalk
WKAR File Photo

The state released new test scores for grade school students today. As Cheyna Roth explains, the results brought good news and bad news.


John Picken / flickr creative commons

A free market think-tank says the use of private contractors in public schools has grown over the last decade-and-a-half. Cheyna Roth reports.


School Hallway
WKAR-MSU File photo

Many states across the country cut funding for public higher education during the Great Recession. A new report shows the money hasn’t been replaced in most states – including in Michigan.


Cheyna Roth / MPRN

A new candidate entered the ring for Michigan Republican Secretary of State nominee Tuesday. Michigan Public Radio’s Cheyna Roth reports on Stan Grot’s  announcement.


Marijuana plant photo
Flickr/Creative Commons

In December, the state will start accepting applications for medical marijuana shops to get licenses. But meanwhile, there’s a dispute over how to deal with the dispensaries that are already open. 

WKAR-FM

Democrats at the State Capitol want to stop major prescription drug price increases.

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