Cheyna Roth

Reporter - Michigan Public Radio Network

Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County.

Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism.

She earned her masters degree at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR.

Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan.

Cheyna also focuses on the Legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN.

Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker.

Holt school/law enforcement news conference
Cheyna Roth

A group of law enforcement members – from sheriffs to prosecutors – unveiled a plan to prevent violence in Michigan schools Thursday. Capitol Correspondent Cheyna Roth reports the conversation around school safety has grown over the last few months.


Doctor's Office
Flickr - Susan

The state Legislature began discussions Wednesday on the newest plan to make people work for Medicaid.


courtroom
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

Lawmakers in Lansing have been working on legislation in response to the Larry Nassar case. And while they’re at it, some say they might want to clarify who counts as a victim when it comes to giving impact statements at a defendant’s sentencing.


voter ballot
File photo / WKAR-MSU

You might soon be able to register to vote from the comfort of your home. Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports lawmakers in the state Senate passed a bill Thursday for online voter registration.

WKAR File Photo / WKAR-MSU

An effective food system in the state’s prisons should go beyond just feeding prisoners. That’s the message of some lawmakers in the state Senate.


It’s national Sunshine Week – time when officials and reporters shed light on access to public information. In Michigan, candidates for state office are using the opportunity to announce how they would improve transparency.

Door leading to courtroom
Mark Bashore / WKAR-MSU

Victims would have more rights under bills passed by the state House. The legislation would require defendants be physically present in the courtroom when a victim or victim’s family give an impact statement at sentencing. 


WKAR File Photo

The Michigan Department of Corrections defended its plans to change how it feeds prisoners Wednesday. Department officials testified in front of a Senate committee.

Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports the state wants to end its use of private vendors for food services.


Youtube

In the race for Michigan’s next governor, a Democrat crossed a significant hurdle today. Abdul El-Sayed was the first Democrat to file his signatures to get on the ballot.

But there have been questions about whether El-Sayed is even eligible to run. Bridge Magazine first reported that his voting history could derail his campaign.



Roads, flood damage repairs, and an investigation could get money sent their way soon. Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth tells us the Legislature sent a spending bill to the governor’s desk Thursday.


picture of the Michigan Capitol Building
lehooper / flickr creative commons

Moms and other activists against gun violence gathered at the state Capitol Wednesday. Capital coorespondent Cheyna Roth reports the participants wanted to meet with as many lawmakers as possible.


WKAR-MSU

Survivors of the former MSU sports doctor abuse were among those who testified for the bills. The legislation would also require adults who work with student athletes to report suspicions of abuse.

Larry Nassar photo
WKAR photo

Survivors of former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar joined with lawmakers to rollout new legislation Monday. Nassar was recently convicted of multiple cases of sexual assault.

Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports the legislation is aimed at curbing sexual misconduct.


On the Feb. 24-25 edition of Current State: neighbors struggling with floodwaters & how you can help; learn where Michigan's gubernatorial candidates stand on gun debate; learn about Dolores Huerta and why she's coming to MSU; two Lansing men make sure dozens of children see Black Panther movie and helping feed fish thanks to whiskey by-products.


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