Cheyna Roth

Reporter - Michigan Public Radio Network

Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County.

Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism.

She earned her masters degree at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR.

Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan.

Cheyna also focuses on the Legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN.

Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker.

Dana Nessel photo
Courtesy photo / Nessel & Kessel Law

A Democratic candidate for state Attorney General says his opponent violated the Michigan Campaign Finance Act. Capitol Correspondent Cheyna Roth has more.


Flickr/Department for Transport

Michigan is moving forward with testing and study of self-driving cars.  

But capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports, while the state has worked out a policy framework about these vehicles, there are details to iron out.


publicdomainpictures

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has approved a permit for Nestle to pump a higher volume of water out of its well in West Michigan.  

Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports.


booking photo
Courtesy / Michigan Attorney General

Current State - the latest on the arrest of an MSU dean; a talk with one of Larry Nassar's survivors and her plans to help Meridian Township; Bridge Magazine's profile of the 39 gun bills in the state legislature; Plus YMusic.


Wikimedia commons

Michigan farmers don’t have to follow certain local ordinances about their farms – as long as the farmers follow the Right to Farm Act. Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports the Attorney General’s opinion doesn’t come as a surprise – but it is a relief to farmers.


Baby
Dylan Parker / Wikimedia Commons

Anonymity could help make sure abandoned babies are left in safe places. That’s the idea behind new legislation in Lansing.


Cheyna Roth / MPRN

A Michigan State University dean who supervised convicted serial molester Larry Nassar is denying criminal charges against him. Capitol correspondent Cheyna Roth reports.


Doctor's Office
Flickr - Susan

Michigan continues its fight against a deadly Hepatitis A outbreak. Nearly 800 people have gotten the disease since August of 2016. Now the state is giving half a million dollars to areas that have not had an outbreak of hepatitis A – yet.


Gavel
s_falkow / flickr creative commons

Judges can’t punish defendants who choose to go to trial. That’s the opinion of the Michigan Court of Appeals.

Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports.


Holt school/law enforcement news conference
Cheyna Roth

A group of law enforcement members – from sheriffs to prosecutors – unveiled a plan to prevent violence in Michigan schools Thursday. Capitol Correspondent Cheyna Roth reports the conversation around school safety has grown over the last few months.


Doctor's Office
Flickr - Susan

The state Legislature began discussions Wednesday on the newest plan to make people work for Medicaid.


courtroom
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

Lawmakers in Lansing have been working on legislation in response to the Larry Nassar case. And while they’re at it, some say they might want to clarify who counts as a victim when it comes to giving impact statements at a defendant’s sentencing.


voter ballot
File photo / WKAR-MSU

You might soon be able to register to vote from the comfort of your home. Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports lawmakers in the state Senate passed a bill Thursday for online voter registration.

WKAR File Photo / WKAR-MSU

An effective food system in the state’s prisons should go beyond just feeding prisoners. That’s the message of some lawmakers in the state Senate.


It’s national Sunshine Week – time when officials and reporters shed light on access to public information. In Michigan, candidates for state office are using the opportunity to announce how they would improve transparency.

Pages