Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Three besieged towns in Syria will soon be receiving humanitarian assistance: The Syrian government said Thursday it will allow aid to enter the villages, after multiple organizations reported deaths from starvation.

Bashar Assad's government is permitting aid to Madaya, which has been under siege by the regime since July, as well as Foua and Kfraya, two villages adjacent to each other that have been besieged by anti-government forces for more than a year, the Associated Press reports.

More than two months after a natural gas storage well in Southern California began uncontrollably spewing methane gas, the governor of California has declared a state of emergency.

The legal saga of the monkey selfie continues: On Wednesday, a federal judge said the macaque who famously snapped a picture of himself cannot be declared the owner of the image's copyright.

At least, until Congress says otherwise.

There's "no indication" that the Copyright Act extends to animals, U.S. District Judge William Orrick wrote in a tentative opinion issued Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco.

The chief justice of Alabama's Supreme Court has ordered the state's probate judges not to issue marriage license to same-sex couples — despite a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court last year that legalized same-sex marriage in America.

Roy S. Moore, the chief justice of the state Supreme Court, issued an administrative order Wednesday. He noted that the Supreme Court of Alabama had, in March of 2015, upheld the state's ban on same-sex marriage.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens revolves around the story of staff-wielding scavenger Rey.

(That's hardly a spoiler; she's front-and-center in the movie poster, after all.)

But in the world of Star Wars toys, Rey's been hard to find — and fans took to social media, under the hashtags #WheresRey and #WhereisRey, to complain about all the movie merchandise that left her out.

A hotel in downtown Dubai erupted in flames on Thursday evening, just two hours before the city was due to celebrate New Year's Eve with a massive fireworks display.

At midnight local time, the celebration proceeded as planned — resulting in a jarring double display of light and smoke, as firefighters continued to battle the blaze at one skyscraper while fireworks were sent off from the nearby Burj Khalifa.

Time zone by time zone, the planet is saying goodbye to 2015.

The end of the year is still hours away in the U.S., but Australia has already hailed the new year with fireworks like those (see above) in Sydney Harbour.

In Japan's capital, balloons were released from Tokyo Tower.

A few highlights from other celebrations planned around the globe:

Ethan Couch — the "affluenza teen" who killed four people while driving drunk two years ago and recently fled to Mexico with his mother — has been granted a temporary stay against his extradition to the U.S. His mother was deported to Los Angeles on Wednesday evening.

Couch and his mother were detained in Mexico on Monday. They originally had been scheduled to return to the U.S. on Wednesday, where Ethan Couch would face a hearing before a juvenile court judge.

In 1957, humans launched a satellite into orbit, Sputnik-1.

The same mission also created our first piece of space junk: the rocket body that took Sputnik into space.

By the year 2000, there were hundreds of satellites in orbit — and thousands of pieces of space junk, including leftover rockets and pieces of debris.

Demonstrators in Chicago are gathering in a high-end shopping district to disrupt last-minute Christmas purchases and raise attention to a 2014 police shooting.

"Protests have been continuing almost daily since the release last month of dashcam video showing a white Chicago police officer firing 16 shots into 17-year old Laquan McDonald as he tried to walk away from officers" in October 2014, NPR's David Schaper reports for our Newscast unit.

Earlier this month, the Las Vegas Review-Journal was purchased under mysterious circumstances. When the buyer's name wasn't revealed, the paper's reporters did some digging and revealed that the Adelson family was behind the deal.

Jeremy Carter, the grandson of former President Jimmy Carter, has died at 28.

Jimmy Carter broke the news at his Sunday school class at Maranatha Baptist Church in Plains, Ga. At the same church, just two weeks ago, Carter announced he was cancer-free after treatments for brain cancer.

This week he had more tragic news to share, as John Lorinc, from member station WABE, reports:

"An official with the church said Jeremy Carter felt unwell Saturday and took a nap.

President Obama wrapped up 2015 by taking another round of questions from the press.

At the traditional end-of-year news conference Friday afternoon, Obama began with a list of achievements, including the legalization of same-sex marriage across America and progress made toward addressing global climate change.

Dennis Hastert, the former speaker of the House who is embroiled in a hush money scandal and pleaded guilty to federal charges this fall, has been hospitalized since the first week of November, his lawyer says.

"Mr. Hastert has suffered a stroke and has been treated for sepsis," attorney Tom Green says. "While in the hospital, two surgeries on his back were performed."

Hastert, 73, has been in the hospital for six weeks, and Green says he might be released "in the early part of the new year."

Enrique Marquez, the man who purchased the guns used in the San Bernardino, Calif., mass shooting this month, is facing criminal charges, the Department of Justice has announced.

Marquez has been charged with conspiring to commit acts of terrorism — for aborted plans authorities say he hatched with Syed Farook, the San Bernardino shooter, in 2011 and 2012 — as well as with unlawfully purchasing the firearms used in the San Bernardino attack.

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