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Intelligence Squared U.S.
5:17 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Debate: Should Physician-Assisted Suicide Be Legal?

Bioethicist Peter Singer argues that, under certain circumstances, people should have the right to die at a time of their choosing.
Samuel La Hoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Since Oregon legalized physician-assisted suicide for the terminally ill in 1997, more than 700 people have taken their lives with prescribed medication — including Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old with an incurable brain tumor, who ended her life earlier this month.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

White House Acknowledges Over-Counting Obamacare Signups

The White House acknowledged today that it overreported the number of signups under the Affordable Care Act by nearly 400,000 people.

Some people with separate medical and dental plans were counted twice, leading the administration to state erroneously that more than 7 million had enrolled in coverage under ACA, instead of the correct figure of about 6.7 million.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Keep Your Head Up: 'Text Neck' Takes A Toll On The Spine

Courtesy of Dr. Kenneth K. Hansraj

"Text neck," the posture formed by leaning over a cellphone while reading and texting, is a big problem, according to the author of a newly published study in the National Library of Medicine.

Kenneth K. Hansraj, chief of spine surgery at New York Spine Surgery & Rehabilitation Medicine, says the bad posture can put up to 60 pounds of pressure on the upper spine — sometimes for several hours a day, depending on how often people look at their devices.

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NPR Ed
4:08 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Why Working With Young Children Is (Still) A Dead-End Job

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 3:54 pm

Right now, at preschool programs around the country, teachers are tapping infinite reserves of patience to keep the peace among children at various stages of development and need. They're also providing meals, wiping noses and delivering a curriculum in math and reading that will get the kids ready for school.

And there are hugs. Lots of hugs.

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Shots - Health News
3:51 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

What Diabetes Costs You, Even If You Don't Have The Disease

The costs of diabetes aren't all as obvious as an insulin pump.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 2:04 pm

Diabetes is an expensive disease to treat, costing the United States $244 billion in 2012, according to an analysis of the disease's economic burden.

When the loss of productivity due to illness and disability is added in, the bill comes to $322 billion, or $1,000 a year for each American, including those without diabetes. That's 48 percent higher than the same benchmark in 2007; not a healthy trend.

The increase is being driven by a growing and aging population, the report finds, as well as more common risk factors like obesity, and higher medical costs.

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Book Reviews
3:09 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

'Redeployment' Explores Iraq War's Physical And Psychic Costs

In his short story collection, former Marine Phil Klay takes his experience in Iraq and clarifies it, lucidly tracing the moral, political and psychological curlicues of Operation Iraqi Freedom. On Wednesday, he won the National Book Award for fiction for the collection.

This review originally aired March 26, 2014.

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Politics
3:09 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Sen. Mitch McConnell's Political Life, Examined, In 'The Cynic'

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) will take over as Senate majority leader in the new term in January.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 4:35 pm

When Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) first entered politics in the 1960s, he started out as moderate — pro-abortion rights, pro-union, in support of the civil rights movement. With time, McConnell shifted to the right as the Republican Party shifted.

"I was just really startled by this when I started looking into it," Alec MacGillis tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "I knew that he had started out as somewhat more moderate — but I didn't realize just how moderate he really was."

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Goats and Soda
2:54 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Indian Shopkeepers Greet Wal-Mart's Expansion Plans With Protests

Protesters gather outside Wal-Mart's offices in Gurgaon, India. Their demand: Wal-Mart should build its stores far from markets where they work.
Rhitu Chatterjee for NPR

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 4:39 pm

A few hundred hawkers and street vendors gathered Wednesday on the side of a dusty, busy road in the northern Indian city of Gurgaon, a few miles from the capital, New Delhi. Some wore black headbands with "No Wal-Mart" signs. Others carried banners that said "Stop uprooting hawkers and vendors."

The crowd of protesters walked down the road to the Indian headquarters of Wal-Mart, located in one of many modern, multistoried buildings. They stood outside, chanting "Wal-Mart, down, down!" "Wal-Mart, come to your senses!"

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

FIFA To Review World Cup Corruption Report

FIFA President Joseph Blatter is flanked by Russian Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov (right) and Qatari Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani on Dec. 2, 2010, in Zurich, Switzerland, after the announcement that Russia will host the 2018 World Cup and Qatar in 2022.
Michael Probst AP

Soccer's governing body said today it will further review the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, reopening for scrutiny the mechanism by which Russia and Qatar were awarded the tournaments.

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National Security
2:29 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

The CIA Wants To Delete Old Email; Critics Say 'Not So Fast'

Central Intelligence Agency Director John Brennan takes questions after addressing the Council on Foreign Relations on March 11. The CIA has proposed deleting the email of almost all employees after they leave the agency. But some critics are saying a larger portion of the email should be preserved.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 6:32 pm

It's a question we've all wrestled with: Which emails should be saved and which ones should be deleted?

The Central Intelligence Agency thinks it's found the answer, at least as far as its thousands of employees and contractors are concerned: Sooner or later, the spy agency would destroy every email except those in the accounts of its top 22 officials.

It's now up to the National Archives — the ultimate repository of all the records preserved by federal agencies — to sign off on the CIA's proposal.

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The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

So What Is An 'Executive Action' Anyway?

In July, President Obama signs the Fair Pay and Safe Workplace executive order, requiring prospective federal contractors to disclose labor law violations.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 8:50 pm

You can read here about President Obama's executive action on immigration. Or here, a story about his executive order.

Although commonly conflated in the media, the two terms aren't exactly interchangeable.

In short ...

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The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Takata Quality Official Apologizes Over Air Bag Defect Linked To Deaths

Hiroshi Shimizu, senior vice president of global quality assurance at Japanese air bag maker Takata, apologizes for the failure of the defective devices on Capitol Hill in Washington on Thursday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 12:37 pm

The executive in charge of quality for Takata Corp. apologized today for the defects in the air bags made by his company that have been linked to at least five deaths and dozens of injuries.

"We are deeply sorry about each of the reported instances in which a Takata air bag has not performed as designed and the driver or passenger had suffered personal injuries or death," Hiroshi Shimizu, senior vice president of quality for Takata, told the Senate Commerce Committee.

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Shots - Health News
11:59 am
Thu November 20, 2014

How Well Do Your Apps Protect Your Privacy?

Google Maps scored an A on PrivacyGrade.org.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 8:21 am

When you open up your Skype app to make a call, it's probably no surprise that it's accessing your phone's call history. But would you expect your Nike+ Running app to collect that information too?

If you're like most people, the answer is no.

That's why the Nike+ Running app gets a B on PrivacyGrade, a site for people to figure out what information their apps might be collecting. Right now it only looks at Android apps, but the site already lists hundreds of them from Google Maps to Instagram to WebMD.

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Shots - Health News
11:44 am
Thu November 20, 2014

A Worry In Theory, Medical Data Privacy Draws A Yawn In Practice

How concerned are people about the privacy of their medical information? The NPR-Truven Health Analytics Health Poll found worries were low.
NPR

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 2:01 pm

When it comes to health records, how concerned are Americans about what happens to their personal information?

We asked in the latest NPR-Truven Health Analytics Health Poll. And, in a bit of surprise to me, the responses showed that, in general, worries don't run very high.

First, we learned that nearly three-quarters of people see doctors who use electronic medical records. So the chances are good that your medical information is being kept digitally and that it can be served up to lots of people inside your doctor's office and elsewhere.

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The Salt
11:36 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Soda Companies Step Up Their Marketing To Black And Latino Kids

Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 3:06 pm

While beverage companies have cut their marketing of unhealthy drinks to children on TV and websites overall, they have ramped up marketing to black and Latino kids and teens, who have higher rates of obesity than white youth, a study finds.

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Goats and Soda
11:06 am
Thu November 20, 2014

An NPR Photographer Looks Ebola In The Eye

Baby Sesay, a traditional healer in Sierra Leone, treated a child who later died, apparently of Ebola, and then became sick herself and went to a care center. As this photo was taken, her body seized up and she nearly collapsed.
David P Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 1:06 pm

Her eyes met the camera. She was there. And yet she wasn't there.

That's how NPR photographer David Gilkey remembers the moment last Saturday when he took a picture of Baby Sesay, a 45-year-old traditional healer in the village of Royail in Sierra Leone.

Sesay had tried to cure a sick little boy. The boy died, likely of Ebola. Then Sesay herself fell ill. She had come to a community care center a few hours earlier, walking in under her own power, to be tested for the virus.

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Performing Arts
11:06 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Mike Nichols, Award-Winning Director Of 'The Graduate,' 'Silkwood,' Dies

Mike Nichols was an ultimate Hollywood insider who won every major show business award directing for stage, film and TV. But his life in America began as an immigrant from Germany. Nichols was honored with an AFI Life Achievement Award in June 2010.
Kevin Winter Getty Images for AFI

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 11:31 am

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The Two-Way
10:48 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Duchess Of Alba, Spain's Richest Woman, Dies At 88

Maria del Rosario Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart, the Duchess of Alba, and her husband, Alfonso Diez, walk out of the chapel after their wedding at Las Duenas Palace in Seville on Oct. 5, 2011. The duchess died Thursday. She was 88.
Miguel Angel Morenatti AP

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 12:49 pm

Spain's richest woman, the Duchess of Alba, has died at the age of 88 in Seville.

Maria del Rosario Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart had more titles than any other aristocrat in the world. Her parents gave her several names, but she preferred Cayetana.

The BBC adds:

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The Two-Way
10:15 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Swedish Appeals Court Upholds Detention Order For Julian Assange

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange attends an August news conference at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. On Thursday, a Swedish appeals court upheld a 2010 detention order against Assange on accusations of sexual assault.
John Stillwell Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 12:59 pm

An appeals court in Sweden has upheld a detention order in connection with sex assault accusations against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who has been living in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London since seeking refuge there more than two years ago.

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Shots - Health News
9:56 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Sleep's Link To Learning And Memory Traced To Brain Chemistry

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 5:23 pm

Almost a century after the discovery that sleep helps us remember things, scientists are beginning to understand why.

During sleep, the brain produces chemicals that are important to memory and relives events we want to remember, scientists reported this week at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Washington D.C.

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The Two-Way
9:45 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Republicans Warn Obama Ahead Of Planned Immigration Action

President Obama is expected to announce steps today that would provide temporary relief to some of the 12 million immigrants in the country illegally. Republicans are warning him against acting unilaterally on the issue.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 5:40 pm

Republicans in Congress are warning President Obama against acting alone on immigration, hours ahead of a planned announcement by the president that could provide temporary relief to some of the nearly 12 million immigrants in the country illegally.

Republicans say any unilateral action on immigration by the president would mean there is no chance of passing a comprehensive immigration overhaul in Congress.

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Remembrances
9:14 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Renowned Theater And Film Director Mike Nichols Dies

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 12:43 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
9:03 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Buffalo, Parts Of Upper Midwest Brace For More Snow

A man walks along a snow-covered street Thursday. Some areas of northern and western New York state could get a combined total of 8 feet of snow this week.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 4:59 pm

The good people of Buffalo are certainly no strangers to snow — but this week has put even the city's most seasoned winter veterans to the test.

The latest from the National Weather Service is that parts of western New York state could get another 3 feet of lake-effect snow on top of the 5.5 feet already on the ground. At least 10 deaths are attributed to this week's severe weather.

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The Two-Way
7:35 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Award-Winning Director Mike Nichols Dies At 83

Journalist Diane Sawyer and director Mike Nichols arrive at the AFI Lifetime Achievement Awards honoring Nichols on June 10, 2010, in Culver City, Calif. Nichols died Wednesday at the age of 83.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 10:08 am

Updated at 8:40 a.m.

Award-winning director Mike Nichols has died at the age of 83, ABC News announced in a statement.

"He was a true visionary, winning the highest honors in the arts for his work as a director, writer, producer and comic and was one of a tiny few to win the EGOT — an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony in his lifetime," ABC News President James Goldston said in the statement.

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Florida State University Gunman Shot Dead By Campus Police

Tallahassee police investigate a shooting outside the Strozier Library on the Florida State University campus in Tallahassee, Fla., on Thursday. The gunman was shot and killed by police officers.
Mark Wallheiser AP

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 8:26 am

Florida State University police shot and killed a gunman who had opened fire in the crowded university library around midnight. Three people were wounded.

Michael DeLeo, Tallahassee, Fla.'s chief of police, said the gunman appears to have acted alone.

"It will take not only hours but days to put all the pieces together," he said at a news conference this morning. "Obviously, everyone wants to know why, and that's the hard question that we're going to continue to investigate and try to find those answers for everybody."

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Europe
7:09 am
Thu November 20, 2014

German College Kids Design Traffic Light Game

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 9:12 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Europe
6:19 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Hotel Charges Couple Extra For Bad Review

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 9:12 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Latin America
5:02 am
Thu November 20, 2014

After Fighting Crime, Ex-Guatemala Attorney General Moves To U.S.

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 9:12 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
5:02 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Wanted: Snow Shovelers To Clear Bills' Stadium

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 1:07 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
5:02 am
Thu November 20, 2014

What The U.S. Could Learn From Japan's Latest Recession

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 2:37 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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