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Around the Nation
4:53 am
Fri October 24, 2014

With Ferguson Protests, 20-Somethings Become First-Time Activists

Dontey Carter (from left), Mel Moffitt, Lenard Smith, Ned Alexander and Allen Frazier are all members of the Lost Voices group, formed after Michael Brown's death in August. They say they want to ensure justice for Michael Brown and other unarmed individuals killed by police officers.
Cheryl Corley NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 11:18 am

In the weeks after 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., protesters gathered daily at the site of a burned-out convenience store.

About a block away, the empty lot of a boarded-up restaurant became the campsite for a group of young activists called the Lost Voices. During the protests, the group "invited all the people who can't come out every day and wanted to share the experience with us," says Lenard Smith.

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The Two-Way
2:23 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Frank Mankiewicz, Aide Who Announced Robert Kennedy's Death, Dies

Frank Mankiewicz, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's press secretary, updates the media about Kennedy's condition after being shot in June 1968. Mankiewicz died Thursday at the age of 90.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 1:50 pm

Updated at 11:15 a.m. ET

Frank Mankiewicz, a longtime Washington insider who as press secretary to Robert Kennedy in 1968 announced the senator's death by an assassin's bullet and who later served as the head of NPR, has died at age 90.

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Around the Nation
6:35 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Park Service Construction Damaged Native American Burial Sites

Jim Nepstad, superintendent of Effigy Mounds National Monument in northeast Iowa, stands at the top of a bluff looking over the Mississippi River.
Clay Masters NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 2:10 pm

Imagine being able to drive an all-terrain vehicle right up next to a sacred earthen Native American burial mound.

At Effigy Mounds National Monument, you can. Three million dollars' worth of illegal construction projects went on for a decade at one of the nation's most sacred Native American burial grounds in northeast Iowa. And it happened under the watch of the National Park Service.

The park didn't do the proper archaeological studies before installing an intricate boardwalk system that now encircles ancient burial mounds that are shaped like bears and birds.

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All Tech Considered
6:35 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters.
Greg E. Mathieson Sr. Mai/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:57 pm

Today's mobile phones can do almost everything a computer can. But we still need them for their most basic purpose: making phone calls — especially in emergencies.

Yet existing technology can't always pinpoint a caller's location, particularly when a 911 caller is indoors.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed new regulations for wireless carriers to help address the problem, but so far, wireless providers are resisting the changes.

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The Salt
6:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

How 'Foodies' Were Duped Into Thinking McDonald's Was High-End Food

McDonald's Organic/youtube

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 1:36 pm

We all know that how a food is packaged and marketed can influence our choices, no matter how hard we try to shake the effect. Haven't you ever found yourself contemplating a row of wines, trying to decide which bottle to buy, and then opting for the one with the higher price tag, the prettier label or the more tempting descriptors?

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The Two-Way
6:23 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Second White House Fence Jumper Had Been Arrested Before

A Secret Service police officer walks outside the White House in Washington on Thursday.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 7:59 pm

The man who jumped the White House fence on Wednesday night has been charged with unlawful entry of the White House grounds and harming animals used in law enforcement.

According to officials, Dominic Adesanya kicked and punched two Secret Service dogs. NPR's Tamara Keith filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The dogs, Hurricane and Jordan, helped stop the fence jumper in his tracks on the White House lawn.

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Law
5:29 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

ACLU Challenges Miami Law On Behalf Of Homeless Sex Offenders

This encampment under the Julia Tuttle Causeway in Miami, shown in 2008, was cleared out by authorities in 2009. It was home to sex offenders who were unable to find places where they were permitted to live under Miami-Dade County's strict residency law. Although this makeshift community was broken up, homeless sex offenders continue to camp out in other areas of the county.
David Adame AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 8:15 pm

Miami-Dade County's sex offender residency restrictions — some of the tightest in the country — drew national attention a few years ago when an encampment of sex offenders sprang up on a causeway in Biscayne Bay. After a public outcry, local and state authorities evicted several dozen people, mostly men, from that makeshift settlement.

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Politics
5:28 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Democrats Remain Optimistic About Senate, Gubernatorial Races

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 5:50 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
4:57 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

What's My Risk Of Catching Ebola?

Data sources: David Ropeik/Harvard University, National Weather Service, World Health Organization, Northeastern University Laboratory for the Modeling of Biological and Socio-Technical Systems, National Geographic, United States Census
Adam Cole and Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 10:57 pm

Health officials are saying it. Scientists are saying it. Heck, even many journalists are saying it: "The risk of Ebola infection remains vanishingly small in this country," The New York Times wrote Wednesday.

But what does that mean? Are you more likely to be struck by lightning or catch Ebola?

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Global Health
4:39 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Why Do Ebola Mortality Rates Vary So Widely?

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
4:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Cigarette-Maker Reynolds American To Ban Smoking At Work

The headquarters of Reynolds American in downtown Winston-Salem, N.C.. Starting in January, workers there will no longer be allowed to smoke at their desks.
Chris Keane Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:35 pm

Reynolds American, the country's second-largest cigarette-maker, is changing its policy on smoking in the office. Until now, Reynolds employees have been able to light up at their desks, but come January, workers will have to either go outside or use specially equipped smoking rooms.

"We allowed smoking of cigarettes, cigars, pipes, traditional tobacco products throughout our facilities," says David Howard, a spokesman for Reynolds American. He says it's not as though his co-workers chain-smoke at work.

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Around the Nation
4:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

In Missouri, A Tale Of Two Fergusons

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
4:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Please Do Not Leave A Message: Why Millennials Hate Voice Mail

The phone company Vonage reported a drop in voice mail retrievals over the past year. Many of those ignoring voice mails are millennials.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:35 pm

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

We've all heard that automated voice mail lady, telling us what to do after the beep. But fewer people than ever are leaving messages. And the millennials, they won't even listen to them — they'd much rather receive a text or Facebook message.

"I did have at one point in time like 103 unheard messages," says 31-year-old Antonia Kidd.

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Shots - Health News
4:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

FDA Cracks Down On Fake Ebola Cures Sold Online

The problem isn't just that fake cures are worthless, doctors say. Fraudulent claims also give some people the false sense that the product can protect them from getting sick.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 11:59 am

Snake venom, vitamin C, Nano Silver and herbs have all been pitched online as a treatment or cure for Ebola. None has the backing of the FDA.

"Unfortunately during public health threats such as Ebola, fraudulent products that claim to prevent, treat, cure disease often appear on the market almost overnight," says Gary Coody, the FDA's national health fraud coordinator. In particular, the FDA wants consumers to beware Ebola "cures" peddled online.

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The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Report Says UNC Grade-Boosting Scandal Involved Fake Classes

University of North Carolina system President Tom Ross and UNC Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol L. Folt talk during a special joint meeting of the UNC Board of Governors and the UNC Chapel Hill Board of Trustees on Wednesday.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:51 pm

Fake classes, inflated grades and one academic department that facilitated it all. Those are all detailed in a newly released report on grade-fixing at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

The scandal came to light in 2011, but the report out Wednesday offers the most wide-sweeping look yet at how some school staff members boosted the grades of more than 3,000 students — nearly half of them athletes — over nearly 20 years.

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Michel Martin, Going There
3:19 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

In North Carolina, Latino Voters Could Decide Tight Senate Race

Lacey Williams (from left), Mary Espinosa, Jaime Villegas, Armando Cruz Martinez and Elisa Benitez talk inside the offices of the Latin American Coalition in Charlotte, N.C. According to a 2011 Pew Hispanic report, the median age of Latinos in North Carolina is 24.
Andy McMillan for NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:22 pm

Ahead of the midterm elections, Michel Martin is visiting Charlotte, N.C., to learn more about Latino voters' growing influence in the state. Join Michel for a Facebook chat from 4:30-5 p.m. ET today as she answers questions and shares more on her reporting.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

U.S.-Led Strikes In Syria Have Killed 553, Activists Say

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:23 pm

U.S.-led strikes in Syria have killed 553 people, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported on Thursday.

The Observatory, which relies on reports from activists on the ground, has been providing death-toll estimates since the protests in the country spiraled into civil war beginning in the spring of 2011.

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Shots - Health News
1:58 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

How To Sell Bogus Health Cures In 5 Easy Steps

Wouldn't it be great if this stuff really did cause quick painless weight loss?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:33 pm

I'm bummed that the green coffee weight-loss cure touted by Dr. Oz doesn't work. It could have been the perfect painless antidote to my habit of lying on the sofa eating Russian chocolate.

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Ottawa Attack Seen As Canada's Security Wake-Up Call

Ottawa police officers, with Parliament Hill in the background, guard the area around the National War Memorial in downtown Ottawa on Thursday.
Blair Gable Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 2:28 pm

Until Wednesday, the front door of Canada's main Parliament building, Centre Block, was often left unlocked. Taken as a metaphor for the nation as a whole, many think the attack in Ottawa will change that approach to security.

In the assault, a soldier was killed as he guarded the National War Memorial and a shootout left the gunman dead inside Canada's parliamentary complex.

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Goats and Soda
12:41 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

I'll (Gag) Drink To That: Oral Rehydration Key For Ebola Patients

At the onset of symptoms, Dr. Adaora Igonoh (center) and her colleagues began drinking oral rehydration solution. It doesn't taste great but they say it helped them survive Ebola. They each downed over a gallon a day for nearly a week.
Andrew Esiebo Courtesy of WHO

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 4:55 pm

Have you ever swallowed unflavored rehydration solution, or ORS? That's what they call the mixture of salt, sugar and water given to Ebola patients.

I've taken more than a mouthful, and urgh! It tastes dreadful.

But doctors who were among Nigeria's Ebola survivors all agree that they may not have recovered from the virus without having forced down the foul-tasting, but apparently life-saving fluid.

Gallons of it.

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Goats and Soda
12:31 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Blizzard In Nepal Deals A Blow To Porters As Well As Trekkers

Bilbahadur Tamang, right, and Umesh Lama load up for a trek on the popular Annapurna Circuit.
Donatella Lorch for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 12:41 pm

In early October, blizzard conditions in Nepal killed more than 16 foreign trekkers and 17 locals, most of them lightly-dressed porters who were carrying the trekkers' gear. The tragedy calls attention to the dangers of trekking — and the risky life of local porters.

At 42, Rane Tamang knows the trekking business well. From a poor village in central Nepal and with little formal education, he started work as a porter 25 years ago, lugging 90 pounds of gear up mountains. He moved up to serve as an assistant cook and now alternates between cook and guide.

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All Tech Considered
12:00 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Mark Zuckerberg Shows Off His Mandarin Chinese Skills

In a photo released by Tsinghua University in Beijing, Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg speaks with students there on Wednesday.
AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 2:18 pm

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The Salt
11:49 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Why California's Drought-Stressed Fruit May Be Better For You

These pomegranates are about an inch smaller than the typical size, but they're packed with antioxidants.
Courtesy of Tiziana Centofanti

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 1:36 pm

California's severe drought is putting stress on everyone these days: the residents whose wells are running dry; the farmers forced to experiment with growing their produce with much less water; and of course, the thirsty fruits and vegetables themselves.

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The Protojournalist
11:15 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Girl Scouts Look For A Way Out Of The Woods

Girl Scouts model contemporary uniforms.
From Girl Scouts of the USA website

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:11 pm

The Girl Scouts organization wants s'more — members and leaders, that is.

Membership in Girl Scouts of the USA is on the decline. In the past year, according to the group's official blog, there has been a significant drop nationwide — down 400,000 girls and adults — from 3.2 million to 2.8 million.

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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Canada's Parliament Gives Sergeant-At-Arms Standing Ovation

Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers is applauded in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Thursday. Vickers was credited with shooting the suspect during an attack on the Parliament complex on Wednesday.
Chris Wattie Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 2:31 pm

Barely 24 hours after a gunman attacked Parliament Hill in Ottawa, killing a soldier, lawmakers gave a standing ovation to Kevin Vickers, the legislature's sergeant-at-arms, for reportedly firing the shots that took down the assailant.

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American Made: The New Manufacturing Landscape
10:58 am
Thu October 23, 2014

No Mere Merry-Go-Round: Ohio Carousel Maker Carves From Scratch

The National Zoo's carousel is among dozens that Carousel Works has installed around the U.S., each made to fit in with its surroundings.
James Clark NPR

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 4:33 pm

Wooden carousels with carved and painted animals seem like a relic of the past. But Carousel Works in Mansfield, Ohio, is still making them to order.

"Our biggest trade secret is we've got this big barrel of elbow grease. You've gotta come in here and work every day," says co-owner Art Ritchie.

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Economy
10:52 am
Thu October 23, 2014

You're Enjoying Low Gas Prices, But Is It Really A Good Sign?

Macy Gould shared this photo from Lexington, Ky., where the gas prices are under $3.
Macy Gould Instagram

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 2:40 pm

All around the country, gasoline prices have been falling for weeks, down to an average of about $3 a gallon. Those lower prices are helping restrain inflation across the board.

On Wednesday, the Labor Department said its consumer price index barely inched up 0.1 percent last month. Over the past 12 months, the CPI has risen by 1.7 percent, roughly half of its historical average rate of increase.

That sounds great for consumers.

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Shots - Health News
8:58 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Scientists Fight For Superbug Research As U.S. Pauses Funding

A rogues gallery of the viruses (left to right) that cause MERS, SARS, and influenza.
Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:33 pm

An unusual government moratorium aimed at controversial research with high-risk viruses has halted important public health research, scientists told an advisory committee to the federal government on Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Family Says Nurse Amber Vinson Is Free Of Ebola

Amber Vinson in a photograph taken earlier this week at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. Officials at Emory and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention couldn't detect Ebola in Amber Vinson as of Tuesday evening, her family said in a statement.
AP

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 2:10 pm

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET.

A Texas nurse who contracted Ebola while treating Thomas Eric Duncan in a Dallas hospital is now free of the potentially deadly virus, her family says.

Amber Vinson, 29, remains in treatment at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, but her family said in a statement that since Tuesday evening, doctors had been unable to detect traces of the disease in her blood.

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The Two-Way
8:27 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Ottawa Gunman's Actions Were 'Linked To His Radicalization,' Authorities Say

A makeshift memorial sits on a downtown street a block away from Canada's National War Memorial in Ottawa to remember Canadian soldier Nathan Cirillo, who was shot and killed by an assailant Wednesday.
Warren Toda EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 7:08 pm

Updated at 4:54 p.m. ET

The mother of the man identified as having gunned down a soldier before storming into Canada's Parliament complex offered condolences to the family of the victim, saying she had not seen her son for five years before meeting him for lunch last week.

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